April 21, 2019

Denver County Seeks New Judge to Succeed Retiring Judge Herbert Galchinsky

Veteran Denver County Court Judge Herbert Galchinsky has announced his retirement, and the Denver County Court Judicial Nomination Commission is accepting applications for Denver attorneys interested in succeeding him on the bench.

All attorneys licensed to practice in Colorado for at least five years and who are registered electors in Denver are eligible to apply for the judgeship. Application packages (consisting of one original application plus eight copies) must be received by the Denver County Court Presiding Judge’s Office at the City and County Building, 1437 Bannock St., Room 108, no later than Friday, August 13 at 5:00 p.m.

County court judges receive a provisional, two-year appointment by the governor, after which they are retained by voter approval every four years. The annual salary is $152,445.

Judge Galchinsky is affectionately nicknamed “Herbie the Love Judge” due to his popularity as a marriage official in his off hours.  He has served as a county judge for 16 years.

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Todd L. Taylor Appointed to Weld County’s 19th District Court Bench

Gov. Ritter has appointed Greeley criminal defense attorney Todd L. Taylor to succeed retiring Judge Gilbert A. Gutierrez on the Nineteenth Judicial District Court bench, the governor’s office announced Monday.

Todd was one of three finalists recommended to the governor by the Nineteenth Judicial District Nominating Committee, which met in mid-July to vet and interview applicants for the judgeship. He is a longtime Weld County resident and previously served as a municipal judge for the City of Gilcrest and a deputy district attorney for the Nineteenth Judicial District. He is currently a partner at the Greeley law firm of Taylor & Rapp, LLP, where he specializes in trial law. Todd’s appointment is effective August 22.

Judge Gutierrez announced his retirement in June, after nearly eight years on the bench.

Two New District Court Judgeships Created in Fourth Judicial District

Two new district court judgeships have been created in the Fourth Judicial District, State Judicial announced on Friday, and applicants are being sought for the positions. The new judgeships were authorized by the passage of House Bill 07-1054 (pdf) in 2007, which funded several new positions on district and county court benches in Colorado.

The Fourth District Judicial Nominating Committee plans to convene on Monday, September 13 and Tuesday, September 14, at the El Paso County Judicial Building in Colorado Springs, to vet applicants and recommend nominees to fill the vacancy. The Commission will then recommend finalists for Gov. Bill Ritter to consider for appointment, and the governor will announce his appointees within the 15-day period proscribed by the Colorado Constitution.

The Fourth Judicial District serves the nearly 800,000 residents of El Paso and Teller counties, and its judges hear a mixed docket that includes civil, criminal, domestic relations, juvenile, and probate matters. District court judges receive an annual salary of $128,598, and serve a provisional, two-year term, after which their retention is put to the vote every six years. The new judges’ appointments begin January 1, 2011.

All attorneys licensed to practice in Colorado for at least five years and who are registered electors in the Fourth Judicial District are eligible to apply for the judgeships. Detailed information about the District and the application are available online.

Application packages (consisting of one original application plus seven copies) must be received by the office of Commission ex officio chair, Justice Michael L. Bender, 101 W. Colfax Ave., Eighth Floor, no later than Tuesday, October 19, at 5:00 p.m.

The provisions of HB 07-1054 have created a number of new judgeships announced in recent weeks, including two district court judgeships in Denver’s Second Judicial District and one county court judgeship in the El Paso County Court. Individuals in El Paso County interested in applying for both the District Court and County Court seats must submit separate application packages for each judgeship.

Earlier this month, Judge J. Patrick Kelly and Judge Timothy J. Simmons announced their autumn retirements from the Fourth Judicial District bench. Details about applying to succeed them on the bench are available here.

El Paso County Seeks Applicants for New County Court Judgeship

A new county court judgeship has been created in El Paso County, State Judicial announced Friday, and applicants are being sought for the position. The new judgeship was authorized by the passage of House Bill 07-1054 (pdf) in 2007, which funded several new positions on district and county court benches in Colorado.

The seven-member Fourth Judicial District Court Nominating Commission will convene at the El Paso County Judicial Building in Colorado Springs on Monday, September 13 and Tuesday, September 14, to vet and interview applicants. Following the interviews, the Commission will recommend finalists to Gov. Bill Owens, who is expected to announce his nominee within the 15-day period proscribed by the Colorado Constitution.

Judges in the El Paso County Court receive a provisional, two-year appointment by the governor, after which they are retained by voter approval every four years. The annual salary is $123,067.

All attorneys licensed to practice in Colorado and who are registered electors in El Paso County are eligible to apply for the judgeship. Detailed information about El Paso County Court and the application are available online. Application packages (consisting of one original application plus seven copies) must be received by the office of Commission ex officio chair, Justice Allison H. Eid, 101 W. Colfax Ave., Eighth Floor, by Tuesday, August 31 at 5:00 p.m.

The provisions of HB 07-1054 have created a number of new judgeships announced in recent weeks, including two district court judgeships in the Fourth Judicial District, as well as two of the same in Denver’s Second Judicial District. Individuals in El Paso County interested in applying for both the County Court and District Court seats must submit separate application packages for each judgeship.

In related District news, Judge J. Patrick Kelly and Judge Timothy J. Simmons earlier this month announced their autumn retirements from the Fourth Judicial District bench. Details about applying to succeed them on the bench are available here.

Bench Gets Two Seats Longer in Second Judicial District

Applications for two new Second Judicial District judgeships are sought by the Judicial District’s Nomination Committee, State Judicial announced on Friday. The new judgeships were authorized by the passage of House Bill 07-1054 (pdf) in 2007, which funded several new positions on district and county court benches in Colorado.

The Second District Judicial Nominating Committee will convene on Monday, November 15, to vet applicants and recommend nominees to fill the vacancy. Following the interviews, the Commission will recommend finalists for Gov. Bill Ritter to consider for appointment, and the governor will announce his appointees within the 15-day period proscribed by the Colorado Constitution.

The Second Judicial District Court hears civil, criminal, and domestic relations cases for the 500,000-plus residents of City and County of Denver. District court judges receive a provisional, two-year appointment by the governor, after which they are retained by voter approval every six years. The new judges’ appointments begin January 1, 2011, at an annual salary of $128,598.

All attorneys licensed to practice in Colorado for at least five years and who are registered electors in the Second Judicial District are eligible to apply for the judgeships. Detailed information about the District and the application are available online.

Application packages (consisting of one original application plus seven copies) must be received by the office of Commission ex officio chair, Justice Michael L. Bender, 101 W. Colfax Ave., Eighth Floor, no later than Tuesday, October 19, at 5:00 p.m.

The provisions of HB 07-1054 have created a number of new judgeships announced in recent weeks, including two district court judgeships in El Paso and Teller counties’ Fourth Judicial District and one county court judgeship in the El Paso County Court.

Update: Judge Sean Connelly to Leave Court of Appeals Bench

The Colorado Court of Appeals Judge Sean Connelly has opted not to seek retention in the upcoming November election and will retire from the bench effective January 11, 2011, State Judicial announced. Judge Connelly has elected to step down from the court of appeals at the end of his two-year provisional term.

The 14-member Supreme Court Nominating Commission will meet in August, on a date yet to be announced, to review applications and submit the names of suitable candidates to Gov. Ritter. The governor will then name his appointee within 15 days.

The annual salary is $134,128. Judge Connelly’s successor will begin his or her term in January 2011.

All attorneys licensed to practice in Colorado for at least five years and who are registered electors in the State of Colorado are eligible to apply for the judgeship. Detailed information about the Colorado Court of Appeals and the application are available online. Application packages (consisting of one original application plus 15 copies) must be received by the office of Commission ex officio chair, Chief Justice Mary Mullarkey, 101 W. Colfax Ave., Eighth Floor, no later than Monday, July 26 at 5:00 p.m.

The Commission is also charged with recommending nominees to succeed Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice Mary Mullarkey, who last month announced her November 30 retirement from the high court bench. Individuals interested in being considered for both the supreme court and court of appeals positions are required to submit just one application package for both judgeships. The application package should include a cover letter stating the applicant’s intention to be considered for both the supreme court and court of appeals vacancy, as well as a similar notation on the application itself.

Prior to his 2008 appointment to the court of appeals, Judge Connelly was in private practice and served as a prosecutor in the U.S. Department of Justice in D.C. and the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Denver.

(image source: State Judicial)