April 23, 2019

Bills Limiting Foreclosure Finder’s Fee, Clarifying Documentary Recording Fees, and More Signed by Governor

On Friday, April 15, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed 15 bills into law. To date, he has signed 117 bills this legislative session. Some of the bills signed Friday include a bill reducing finder’s fees for public trustee foreclosures, a bill treating sexual trafficking of a child as child abuse for dependency and neglect cases, a bill clarifying how to calculate filing fees for recording grants or conveyances of real property, and more. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • HB 16-1011 – Concerning the Removal of Restrictions on the Authority of a Board of a Metropolitan District to Provide Activities in Support of Business Development Within the District, by Rep. Ed Vigil and Sens. Leroy Garcia & Kevin Grantham. The bill removes the specified minimum valuation of commercial property for which a board of a metropolitan district can provide activities in support of business recruitment, management, and development.
  • HB 16-1066 – Concerning an Habitual Domestic Violence Offender, by Rep. Kit Roupe and Sen. Linda Newell. Currently, a judge must make a finding of fact regarding whether a defendant is a habitual domestic violence offender. The bill specifies that the trier of fact (judge or jury) may determine habitual status.
  • HB 16-1073 – Concerning the Qualifications of Licensed Electricians, by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Brian DelGrosso and Sens. Lucia Guzman & Mark Scheffel. The bill creates new renewal requirements for people seeking to renew licenses as master electricians, journeyman electricians, or residential wiremen. Renewal applicants will be required to complete 24 hours of continuing education rather than passing a competency evaluation.
  • HB 16-1090 – Concerning the Conditions Under Which a Person May Assist Another for Compensation in Obtaining the Proceeds of a Foreclosure Sale After All Liens Have Been Satisfied, by Rep. Beth McCann and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill limits the premium, or finder’s fee, that a person may charge for offering assistance in recovering the balance of the purchase price of a foreclosed property after all liens and claims against the property have been satisfied.
  • HB 16-1098 – Concerning Updates to Provisions Relating to School Discipline Reporting, by Rep. Polly Lawrence and Sen. Linda Newell. The bill modifies school discipline reporting requirements, requiring that agencies of the Judicial Department make information regarding expunged juvenile delinquency proceedings available to the Division of Criminal Justice, specifies that the attorney general’s requirement to report names of students given criminal citations or diversion is exempt from statutes prohibiting dissemination of confidential information, and allows aggregation of data about incidents involving law enforcement on school property.
  • HB 16-1103 – Concerning Clarifying License Pathways for the Mental Health Professional Workforce, by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Lois Landgraf and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Nancy Todd. The bill specifies that candidates seeking licensure as mental health professionals may, but are not required to, register with the database of registered psychotherapists after completing their degree.
  • HB 16-1106 – Concerning the Authority of a County to Designate Public Roads as a Section of a Pioneer Trail, by Rep. Jim Wilson and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Leroy Garcia. The bill allows a board of county commissioners to designate by resolution any public roads in the county as a pioneer trail, with certain conditions.
  • HB 16-1145 – Concerning the Determination of the Documentary Fee Imposed for Recording a Grant or Conveyance of Residential Real Property, by Rep. Steve Lebsock and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill clarifies that the filing fee for a residential real property conveyance is calculated based on the total sales price, as listed on the conveyance document, and if there is no sales price listed or the amount is less than $500, the documentary fee is calculated based on the total sales price listed on the declaration form.
  • HB 16-1149 – Concerning a Requirement that the Executive Board of a Common Interest Community Created in Colorado Before July 1, 1992, Comply with the Budget Reporting Provision of the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act”, by Rep. Jovan Melton and Sen. Linda Newell. Currently, common interest communities established before July 1, 1992 are exempt from certain reporting requirements. The bill removes the exemption.
  • HB 16-1170 – Concerning the Continuation of the Division of Racing Events in the Department of Revenue, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing Recommendation 1 of the 2015 Sunset Report of the Department of Regulatory Agencies, by Reps. Ed Vigil & Don Coram and Sens. Jerry Sonnenberg & Leroy Garcia. The bill extends the sunset of the Division of Racing Events and the Colorado Racing Commission until September 1, 2023.
  • HB 16-1189 – Concerning the Regulation of Bingo-Raffle Licenses, by Rep. Cole Wist and Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill makes changes to the Secretary of State’s regulation of bingo-raffle licenses. Specifically, the bill allows people whose license was denied to appeal to an ALJ within 60 days, clarifies when consolation prizes must be reported, and removes a restriction on the number of games a person can be a game manager for.
  • HB 16-1224 – Concerning Child Abuse Involving Human Trafficking of Minors, by Rep. Paul Lundeen and Sen. Laura Woods. The bill adds human trafficking of a minor for sexual servitude or commercial sexual exploitation to the definition of child abuse for purposes of dependency and neglect. The bill also requires county departments of human services to immediately offer services to children who are victims of human trafficking when appropriate and to file petitions in juvenile court on the child’s behalf.
  • HB 16-1236 – Concerning Continuation of the Infection Control Advisory Committee, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill extends the sunset of the Infection Control Advisory Committee until July 1, 2021.
  • SB 16-013 – Concerning Statutory Changes Related to the Office of the Child Protection Ombudsman, by Sen. Linda Newell & Rep. Jonathan Singer. The bill makes several statutory changes regarding the Office of the Child Protection Ombudsman, including clarifying its board’s advisory nature, clarifying certain duties and the relationship between the office and the Judicial Department, and removing an audit requirement.
  • SB 16-125 – Concerning the Governance of Credit Unions, and, in Connection Therewith, Authorizing the Appointment of an Audit Committee in Lieu of a Supervisory Committee and Allowing the Reasonable Compensation of a Director for His or Her Service to the Credit Union, by Sen. Chris Holbert and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. The bill allows the board of directors of a credit union to appoint an audit committee in lieu of a supervisory committee.

For all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

Tenth Circuit: Extender Statute Cannot be Tolled by Agreement of the Parties

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in National Credit Union Administration Board v. Barclays Capital, Inc. on Tuesday, March 3, 2015.

The National Credit Union Administration Board (NCUA), acting in its role as conservator for failing credit unions, investigated the failure of two major credit unions and found they had failed because they had relied upon misrepresentations in offering documents about residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) that were essentially junk loans. The NCUA began pursuing remedies against the issuers and underwriters of the RMBS and began settlement negotiations with Barclays and other defendants (collectively, Barclays). During the pendency of the settlement negotiations, the NCUA entered into contracts with Barclays that averred the statute of limitations would be tolled during the settlement negotiations and also that Barclays would not assert untimeliness as a defense in any ensuing litigation.

When the settlement negotiations failed, the NCUA initiated these actions, asserting violations of Sections 11 and 12(a)(2) of the Securities Act, as well as state securities claims under the blue sky laws of Kansas and California. Barclays moved to dismiss for failure to state a claim on several grounds, including untimeliness. Barclays initially honored the tolling agreement but argued the claims were time-barred by the Securities Act’s three-year statute of repose. The NCUA responded that the statute of repose was inapplicable to these cases and instead the Federal Credit Union Act’s “Extender Statute” applied, providing a three-year statute of limitations.

While the actions were pending, the district court issued an opinion in a different case, ruling that contractual tolling was not authorized under the extender statute. Barclays then amended its motion to dismiss based on the different ruling. The district court granted the motion to dismiss, holding the claims were covered by the Extender Statute and not the statute of repose, and that tolling could not be contractually waived. The NCUA appealed.

The Tenth Circuit first determined that the district court correctly applied the Extender Statute and not the statute of repose. The Tenth Circuit recently ruled that the Extender Statute supplants all other time limits. Explaining the difference between statutes of limitations and repose, the Tenth Circuit noted that statutes of repose cannot be equitably tolled and act as an absolute time-bar, whereas statutes of limitations are frequently tolled and are affirmative defenses rather than absolute bars. After analyzing the specific language of the Extender Statute, however, the Tenth Circuit found it explicitly and unambiguously stated it could not be tolled by contract. Nevertheless, the Tenth Circuit reversed the district court’s dismissal, finding that Barclays promised not to assert the affirmative defense of the statute of limitations and it should be held to its promise.

The Tenth Circuit reversed and remanded for further proceedings consistent with its opinion.

Credit Unions Now Able to Offer Federally Insured Attorney Trust Accounts

On December 18, 2014, President Barack Obama signed into law H.R. 3468, “Credit Union Share Insurance Fund Parity Act.” This Act allows credit unions to federally insure attorney trust accounts to the maximum amount allowed under the Share Insurance Fund.

The Act requires the National Credit Union Administration Board to provide pass-through share insurance to shares of any interest in a lawyer’s IOLTA account. Previously, credit unions were not able to insure these accounts at the same levels as banks because not all clients were members of the credit union, creating a competitive disadvantage for credit unions with attorney trust accounts.

 

Legal Community Credit Union Offering Holiday Loan Specials

LCCUThe Legal Community Credit Union is an alternative financial service available exclusively to members of Colorado’s legal community. All members of the Colorado Bar Association, the Denver Bar Association, the Rocky Mountain Paralegal Association, and the Professional Private Investigators Association of Colorado are eligible for membership in the credit union, as well as anyone who works in the 1900 Grant building or the Creekside at Columbine office park. Credit union membership extends to all family members, and does not terminate if you move, change jobs, or retire. Plus, the credit union offers great customer service and great interest rates.

The Legal Community Credit Union is offering loan specials through the end of the year for credit union members. Holiday stimulus loans, auto loans, and auto refinancing loans are all available at reduced interest rates. More information about the holiday loan specials is available here.

To apply for credit union membership and enjoy great rates on loans, click here.

Legal Community Credit Union of Colorado Offers Discounts, Services, and More

Does your bank offer you discounts on auto, home, and life insurance? Do you get discounts on vacations from your bank? What about identity theft protection discounts? If the answer is no, you need to consider opening an account with the Legal Community Credit Union of Colorado.

Membership in the Legal Community Credit Union of Colorado is open to all Colorado Bar Association members, as well as to their family members and employees. Legal Community Credit Union offers traditional banking services and auto loans, and the benefits do not stop there. Partnerships with Balance Financial ServicesTrustage Insurance CompanyInvest in America, and Get Away Today vacations provide Legal Community Credit Union members with benefits far beyond traditional banking.

Legal Community Credit Union of Colorado also offers counseling services to its members. Money management, identity theft protection, credit report review, and housing counseling are some of the financial education services provided by the Legal Community Credit Union through its partners.

For more information on how to make your money work for you, visit the Legal Community Credit Union of Colorado website.