July 22, 2019

Colorado Supreme Court: Unnecessary Presence of Parents at Initial Consultation Voids Attorney-Client Privilege

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in In re Fox v. Alfini on Monday, December 3, 2018.

In this original proceeding pursuant to C.A.R. 21, the court reviews the district court’s order compelling production of a recording of the Petitioner’s initial consultation with her attorney. The district court determined that the recording was not subject to the attorney-client privilege because her parents were present during the consultation and their presence was not required to make the consultation possible. Further, the district court refused to consider several new arguments that the Petitioner raised in a motion for reconsideration.
The supreme court issued a rule to show cause and now concludes that the presence of a third party during an attorney-client communication will ordinarily destroy the attorney-client privilege unless the third party’s presence was reasonably necessary to the consultation or another exception applies. Here, because the record supports the district court’s finding that the Petitioner had not shown that her parents’ presence was reasonably necessary to facilitate the communication with counsel, the court perceives no abuse of discretion in the district court’s ruling that the recording at issue was not protected by the attorney-client privilege.
The court further concludes that, under settled law, the district court did not abuse its discretion in refusing to consider the new arguments that the Petitioner raised in her motion for reconsideration.
Accordingly, the court discharges the rule to show cause.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.