April 22, 2019

e-Legislative Report: Week of April 11, 2016

legislationWelcome to another edition of the e-leg report. We’re nearing the halfway point at the capitol, and that means the state budget debate is at hand. A number of bills that the CBA is working are subject to appropriations – and only after the budget debate is settled will we know whether they are likely to be funded or not.

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me atjschupbach@cobar.org.

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association. Members are welcome to attend the meetings—please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting Update

Here is a quick rundown of the bills on which we have recently taken a position.

HB 16-1211 – Marijuana Transporter License

The bill creates a retail marijuana transporter license and a medical marijuana transporter license. The license is valid for five years. A licensed marijuana transporter (transporter) provides logistics, distribution, and storage of marijuana and marijuana products. A transporter may contract with multiple businesses and may also hold another marijuana license. A transporter must be licensed by December 31, 2017, in order to continue to operate. The bill describes the circumstances under which a business can terminate a contract with a transporter.

The Bar’s Cannabis Law Committee is currently monitoring and preparing comments on this bill. The bill is working through its first chamber and has been greatly amended from its original form. The Legislative Policy Committee has not taken action on this bill.

HB 16-1235 – Commissions Evaluating State Judicial Performance

The bill makes revisions to various functions of the state commission on judicial performance (state commission) and the district commissions on judicial performance (district commission), referred to collectively as the “commissions.”

This bill was postponed indefinitely (killed) in the House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee. The Colorado Bar Association had many concerns with the cost and operation of the bill.

HB 16-1270 – Security Interest Owner’s Interest In Business Entity

Under current law, the Uniform Commercial Code (Code) invalidates contractual limits on the transferability of some assets that can be subject to a security interest. In 2006, the Colorado Corporations and Associations Act (Act) was amended to clearly and broadly exempt an owner’s interest in a business entity from these Code provisions to effectuate the “pick your partner” principle that allows small businesses to control their ownership. Section 3 of the bill narrows the exemption in the Act to that necessary for “pick your partner,” and sections 1 and 2 codify this narrowed exemption in the Code.

This bill, part of a four bill package of business entities clean up acts, was supported by the Bar and has passed the House and Senate and is on its way to be signed by the Governor.

HB 16-1275 – Taxation Of Corporate Income Sheltered In Tax Haven

The bill pertains to an affiliated group of corporations filing a combined report. In a combined report filing, the tax is based on a percentage of the entire taxable income of all of the includable corporations, but the tax is assessed only against the corporation or corporations doing business in Colorado. Including more affiliated corporations in the combined report may result in an increase in income subject to tax.

There are jurisdictions located outside of the United States with no tax or very low rates of taxation, strict bank secrecy provisions, a lack of transparency in their tax system operations, and a lack of effective exchange of information with other countries. There are several common legal strategies for sheltering corporate income in such jurisdictions, often called “tax havens.”

Notwithstanding a current requirement in state law that those corporations with 80% or more of their property and payroll assigned to locations outside of the United States be excluded from a combined report, the bill makes a corporation that is incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance an includable C corporation for purposes of the combined report.

The bill defines a corporation incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance to mean any C corporation that is incorporated in a jurisdiction that has no or nominal effective tax on the relevant income and that meets one or more of five factors listed in the bill, unless it is proven to the satisfaction of the executive director of the Department of Revenue that such corporation is incorporated in that jurisdiction for a legitimate business purpose.

The bill requires the state controller to credit a specified amount per fiscal year to the state education fund to be used to help fund public school education.

The bill requires the secretary of state to submit a ballot question, to be treated as a proposition, at the statewide election to be held in November 2016 asking voters:

  • To increase taxes annually by the taxation of a corporation’s state income that is sheltered in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance;
  • To use the resulting tax revenue to help fund elementary and secondary public school education; and
  • To allow an estimate of the resulting tax revenue to be collected and spent notwithstanding any limitations in section 20 of article X of the state constitution (TABOR).

The Tax Law section of the CBA voted to oppose this bill, which was postponed indefinitely (killed) by the Senate State Affairs Committee. The Bar had concerns over the cost of vague language in the bill as well as the impact on the courts and judicial system.

HB 16-1310 – Operators Liable For Oil And Gas Operations

Under current law governing relations between surface owners and oil and gas operators, to prevail on a claim the surface owner must present evidence that the operator’s use of the surface materially interfered with the surface owner’s use of the surface of the land. The bill amends this requirement to allow proof that the operator’s oil and gas operations harmed the surface owner’s use of the surface of the land, caused bodily injury to the surface owner or any person residing on the property of the surface owner, or damaged the surface owner’s property.

The Legislative Policy Committee voted to oppose this bill because it upends the burden of proof responsibility. The bill has passed the House and is moving on to the Senate, where it will be heard by the Agriculture Committee.

HB 16-1331 – Policies On Juvenile Shackling In Court

The bill requires restraints on a juvenile to be removed prior to any court proceeding, except when the court determines the restraints are necessary:

  • To prevent physical harm to the juvenile or another person;
  • To prevent disruptive courtroom behavior by the juvenile, evidenced by a history of behavior that created potentially harmful situations or presented substantial risk of physical harm; or
  • To prevent the juvenile from fleeing the courtroom, when there is evidence of an escape history or other relevant factors.

The prosecution, sheriff, or any other detention or pretrial personnel may request that an individual juvenile be restrained in the courtroom. The court shall provide the juvenile’s attorney an opportunity to be heard before the court allows the use of restraints on a juvenile. The court may conduct a hearing on the use of restraints without the juvenile being present.

The CBA supports this bill as good policy and an extension of the efforts the courts have made this past year. While the courts need discretion, we believe this bill strikes the right balance for outlining the policies on how and when juveniles should be subject to shackling.

HB 16-1346 – Open Records Subject To Inspection Denial

The bill allows a custodian to deny access to confidential personal information records and employee personal e-mail addresses. The provisions of the Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) that relate to civil or administrative investigations and trade secrets and other privileged and confidential information apply to the judicial branch.

The Bar Association opposed this bill because of constitutional and separation of powers concerns regarding the relationship between the judicial and legislative branches of government. In addition, we believe that the PAIRR rules issued by the Chief Justice, which closely mirror the text of CORA, are better suited to meet the information needs of requesters while maintaining the integrity of judicial records.

HB 16-1394 -Aligning Issues Around At-risk Persons

The bill implements the following recommendations of the at-risk adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities mandatory reporting implementation task force:

  • Standardizing statutory definitions among the Colorado Criminal Code, adult protective services in the department of human services, and the office of community living in the department of health care policy and financing;
  • Specifying that enhanced penalties for crimes against an at-risk person apply to all persons 70 years of age or older and to all persons with a disability; and
  • Clarifying and expanding the definitions of persons who are required to report instances of mistreatment of at-risk elders or at-risk adults with an intellectual and developmental disability (adults with IDD).

The bill also:

  • Reduces the time in which a law enforcement agency or county department is required to prepare a written report from 48 hours to 24 hours;
  • Specifies that a county department of human or social services is to conduct an investigation of allegations of mistreatment of an at-risk adult; and
  • Clarifies that the human rights committee is responsible for ensuring that an investigation of mistreatment of an adult with IDD occurred.

The Colorado Bar Association opposed the bill as written, but is working with stakeholders to review amendments from other stakeholder groups. We are working with and talking with the sponsors frequently.

SB 16-130 – Methods To Collect Consumer Use Tax

Consumer use tax is the complement to sales tax and is due on the purchases of goods where the retailer did not charge sales tax. For example, any time consumers make an Internet purchase and the out-of-state retailer does not charge sales tax, the purchaser should pay the equivalent amount of sales tax as consumer use tax directly to the Colorado Department of Revenue (department). The department has added a use tax line to the 2015 individual income tax return form in an effort to make self-reporting of use tax more convenient for consumers.

The bill specifies that after the 2015 income tax year the department is not allowed to add use tax reporting lines to the individual income tax return form for any reason. The bill also prohibits the department from auditing any taxpayer for any amount he or she reported on the use tax lines included in the 2015 individual income tax return form.

The CBA is monitoring this bill and has sought permission to make changes to the bill to ensure that collecting use taxes is efficient.

SB 16-131 Overseeing Fiduciaries’ Management Of Assets

The bill clarifies statutory language concerning the removal of a fiduciary to ensure that a fiduciary’s authority is suspended as soon as a petition to remove the fiduciary is filed. The bill adds a provision to the conservatorship statutes stating that an adult ward or protected person has a right to be represented by a lawyer of their choosing unless the trial court finds the person lacks sufficient capacity to provide informed consent for representation by a lawyer. The bill states that after a fiduciary receives notice of proceedings for his, her, or its removal, the fiduciary shall not pay compensation or attorney fees and costs from the estate without an order of the court.

This bill rearranges the existing responsibilities for fiduciaries managing assets. It is a cleanup and reorganization of these statutes and adds the right to legal counsel for wards and protected persons. The bill is scheduled for committee later this week.

SB 16-133 – Transfer Of Property Rights At Death

Under current law, a certificate of death, a verification of death document, or a certified copy thereof, of a person who is a joint tenant may be placed of record with the county clerk and recorder of the county in which the real property affected by the joint tenancy is located, together with a supplementary affidavit. The bill removes the requirement that the person who swears to and affirms the supplementary affidavit has no record interest in the real property. The bill includes inherited individual retirement accounts and inherited Roth individual retirement accounts as property exempt from levy and sale under writ of attachment or writ of execution.

The bill amends provisions concerning determination-of-heirship proceedings, as follows:

  • Clarifies the definition of “interested person” so that anyone affected by the ownership of property may commence a proceeding;
  • Describes when an unprobated will may be used as part of a proceeding;
  • Clarifies notice requirements; and
  • Ensures that a judgment and decree will convey legal title as opposed to equitable title.

The bill enacts portions of section 5 of the Uniform Power of Appointment Act, with amendments.
This bill, the second part of the Colorado Bar Association’s probate reorganization bills, has passed the legislature and will be sent to the Governor shortly.

Bills that the LPC is monitoring, watching or working on can be found at this link:
http://www.statebillinfo.com/sbi/index.cfm?fuseaction=Public.Dossier&id=21762&pk=996

e-Legislative Report: Week of March 14, 2016

Welcome to another edition of the e-leg report. We’re nearing the halfway point at the capitol, and that means the state budget debate is at hand. A number of bills that the CBA is working are subject to appropriations – and only after the budget debate is settled will we know whether they are likely to be funded or not.

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me at jschupbach@cobar.org.

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association. Members are welcome to attend the meetings—please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting held Friday, February 26, 2016

There was no meeting of the LPC on March 4. We will be considering a number of bills this coming week, but here is a quick rundown of the bills on which we have recently taken a position.

HB 16-1165 – Colorado Child Support Commission Statutory Changes
The LPC voted to seek an amendment to this bill, which was subsequently added in the House before the bill was passed on to the Senate. The amendments offered clarify the calculations of parenting time in certain circumstances

HB 16-1275 – Taxation Of Corporate Income Sheltered In Tax Haven
The LPC voted to oppose this bill because of vague language that could result in unnecessary litigation and an additional burden on the judiciary.

HB 16-1270 – Security Interest Owner’s Interest In Business Entity
This is the first of a package of four business law clean-up bills from the Business Law Section. It aims to protect the security interest of owners and secure the “pick a partner” provision in Colorado law for all types of business entities.

SB 16-131 – Overseeing Fiduciaries’ Management Of Assets
This bill, written by members of the Trust & Estate and Elder Law sections, clarifies provisions in the Colorado Probate Code regarding a person’s right to counsel and the removal of a fiduciary.

SB 16-133 – Transfer Of Property Rights At Death
This bill clarifies the process and rights associated with property transfers after death by clarifying existing law and providing that the Colorado Probate Code prevails over the Uniform Power of Appointment Act where the Colorado Probate Code is better suited for the state’s probate process.

Bills that the LPC is monitoring, watching or working on can be found here.

New Bills of Interest

HB 16-1339 – Agricultural Property Foreclosure
Current law establishes the initial date of sale of foreclosed property based on who is selling the property and whether the property is agricultural or nonagricultural. Property is nonagricultural unless all of the property is considered agricultural. The bill extends the provisions relating to agricultural property to property in which any part is agricultural.

SB 16-148 – Require Civics Test Before Graduating from High School
Under existing law, each high school student must satisfactorily complete a civics course as a condition of high school graduation. In connection with this requirement, the bill requires each student who is enrolled in ninth grade during or after the 2016-17 school year to correctly answer, before graduating from high school, at least 60 questions from the civics portion of the naturalization test (test) used by the United States citizenship and immigration services. The school district, charter school, or school operated by a board of cooperative services (local education provider) that enrolls the student may allow the student to take the test on multiple occasions while enrolled in ninth through twelfth grade and, if necessary, to repeat the test until the student correctly answers at least 60 questions. Once the student correctly answers 60 questions, the local education provider will note the accomplishment on the student’s transcript. A student who has a disability is excused from this requirement, except to the extent it may be required in the student’s individualized education program. The superintendent or principal of a local education provider may waive the requirement for a student who meets all of the other graduation requirements and demonstrates the existence of extraordinary circumstances that justify the waiver. Each local education provider has complete flexibility in determining the manner of delivering the test and may incorporate the test into its existing curriculum. A local education provider shall not use the results of the test in measuring educator effectiveness.

SB 16-150 – Marriages By Individuals In Civil Unions
The bill addresses issues that have arisen in Colorado regarding marriages by individuals who are in a civil union or who entered or who will enter into a civil union after the passage of the bill. The bill amends the statute on prohibited marriages to disallow a marriage entered into prior to the dissolution of an earlier civil union of one of the parties, except a currently valid civil union between the same two parties. The executive director of the Department of Public Health and Environment is directed to revise the marriage license application to include questions regarding prior civil unions. The bill states that the “Colorado Civil Union Act” (act) does not affect a marriage legally entered into in another jurisdiction between two individuals who are the same sex. The bill states that a civil union license and a civil union certificate do not constitute evidence of the parties’ intent to create a common law marriage. Two parties who have entered into a civil union may subsequently enter into a legally recognized marriage with each other by obtaining a marriage license from a county clerk and recorder in the state and by having the marriage solemnized and registered as a marriage with a county clerk and recorder. The bill states that the effect of marrying in that circumstance is to merge the civil union into a marriage by operation of law. A separate dissolution of a civil union is not required when a civil union is merged into a marriage by operation of law. If one or both of the parties to the marriage subsequently desire to dissolve the marriage, legally separate, or have the marriage declared invalid, one or both of the parties must file proceedings in accordance with the procedures specified in the “Uniform Dissolution of Marriage Act.” Any dissolution, legal separation, or declaration of invalidity of the marriage must be in accordance with the “Uniform Dissolution of Marriage Act.” If a civil union is merged into a marriage by operation of law, any calculation of the duration of the marriage includes the time period during which the parties were in a civil union. The criminal statute on bigamy is amended, effective July 1, 2016, to include a person who, while married, marries, enters into a civil union, or cohabits in the state with another person not his or her spouse and to include a person who, while still legally in a civil union, marries, enters into a civil union, or cohabits in the state with another person not his or her civil union partner. mmittees of the Bar Association.

e-Legislative Report: February 22, 2016

Welcome e-leg report readers to this week’s installment of the world under the Gold Dome. As always, we welcome your feedback, thoughts, comments and questions. This news report is designed to keep you up-to-date on activities at the capitol that are of interest to the bar association and to lawyers across practice areas.

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me at jschupbach@cobar.org.

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association. Members are welcome to attend the meetings; please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting Update

The following bills were discussed by the LPC on 2.19.16. Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

HB 16-1191 Bill Of Rights For Persons Who Are Homeless
The bill creates the “Colorado Right to Rest Act,” which establishes basic rights for persons experiencing homelessness, including, but not limited to, the right to use and move freely in public spaces without discrimination, to rest in public spaces without discrimination, to eat or accept food in any public space where food is not prohibited, to occupy a legally parked vehicle, and to have a reasonable expectation of privacy of one’s property. The bill does not create an obligation for a provider of services for persons experiencing homelessness to provide shelter or services when none are available.
The LPC considered this bill at the request of the Civil Rights Committee, but took no position on the bill.

HB 16-1110 Parent’s Bill Of Rights
The bill establishes a liberty interest and fundamental right for parents in the care, custody, and control of a parent’s child, restricting governmental entities from infringing on such interests and rights without demonstrating a compelling governmental interest that cannot be accomplished through less restrictive means.
The LPC voted to oppose this bill because it reverses the long-standing policy position of the Colorado Judicial system to act in the best interest of the child.

HB 16-1235 Commissions Evaluating State Judicial Performance
The bill makes revisions to various functions of the state commission on judicial performance (state commission) and the district commissions on judicial performance (district commission), referred to collectively as the “commissions.” The revisions include: changing the makeup of the state commission to include one representative from each judicial district to ensure representation from the entire state; establishing guidelines for when attorneys and nonattorneys are appointed to the state commission by a district commission; not allowing the chief justice to select individuals for the state commission, which reviews the chief justice’s performance; mandating annual public meetings at which the public is invited to attend and confidentially comment on justices and judges; requiring the state commission to obtain and verify required financial disclosures, criminal histories, and driving histories for each justice or judge reviewed by the commissions; requiring judicial evaluations to take place every two years and to be made public at that time; mandating that the commissions make a “do not retain” recommendation when a majority of commissioners determine that it is more probable than not that a justice or judge knowingly committed a dishonest act during the performance of judicial duties, knowingly made inaccurate or insufficient public financial disclosures, or was improperly influenced by a conflict of interest in performing a judicial act; and mandating that the commissions make a “do not retain” recommendation when two-thirds of the attorneys who complete a questionnaire or survey for the commission recommend that the justice or judge not be retained. The bill is funded from any fees and cost recoveries for electronic filings, network access and searches of court databases, electronic searches of court records, and any other information technology services performed pursuant to statute.
The LPC voted to oppose this bill based on the consideration that this is a longstanding and fundamental change that is not in the best interest of the administration of justice in Colorado.

SB 16-085 Uniform Trust Decanting Act
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. “Decanting” is a term used to describe the distribution of assets from one trust into a second trust. The bill enacts the “Colorado Uniform Trust Decanting Act” (Act), which allows a trustee to reform an irrevocable trust document within reasonable limits that ensure the trust will achieve the settlor’s original intent. The Act prevents decanting when it would defeat a charitable or tax-related purpose of the settlor.
The LPC voted to support this Uniform Bill as modified to meet the considerations of Family Law, Trust & Estate and Elder Law sections.

Updates regarding bills the CBA is currently focused on:

SB 16-013 Clean-up Office Of The Child Protection Ombudsman
Senator Newell has pulled the language of concern from the bill.  SB 13 was passed out of committee on Monday.

SB 16-043 Student Loans Consumer Protections
The CBA testified in favor of this bill, at the request of the Colorado Young Lawyers Division. The bill failed to pass out of committee.

SB 16-047 No Detention For Juveniles Who Are Truant
The CBA testified that while detention for truancy is not something the Bar supports as policy, the bill was fundamentally flawed by prohibiting the judicial branch from effecting its own valid orders. Case law from Colorado in the 1990s is directly on point to the Bar’s constitutional concerns.

SB 16-084 Uniform Substitute Health Care Decision-making Documents
The Bar remains neutral on this bill, while the Health Law Section has some concerns and opposition to the language. The bill was heard in committee, but was not voted on. We are waiting for the Senate to take action on the bill.

SB 16-071 Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act 2015
The CBA has not taken a position on this bill. The Department of Regulatory Affairs has some outstanding concerns that they are addressing with the Uniform Law Commission.

SB 16-088 Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access To Digital Asset
This bill, as amended to accommodate both the Trust & Estate and Business Law Sections, is moving through the legislature as anticipated.

SB 16-115 Electronic Recording Technology Board
The bill, which is supported by the Bar and the Real Estate Section, has passed its first two committee hearings and now heads to Senate Appropriations.

HB 16-1051 Forms To Transfer Vehicle Ownership Upon Death
The CBA is working with the sponsors on some amendments for this bill. The bill is now in its second chamber.

HB 16-1078 Local Government Employee Whistleblower Protection
The CBA is working on this bill, which was amended and is now headed to appropriations in the House.

New Bills of Interest

These are a few new bills recently introduced. They have been sent to CBA sections for review and comment. If you have any questions about these or any other bills, please drop me a line. I’m happy to help you however I can.

HB 16-1270 Security Interest Owner’s Interest In Business Entity
Under current law, the “Uniform Commercial Code” (Code) invalidates contractual limits on the transferability of some assets that can be subject to a security interest. In 2006, the “Colorado Corporations and Associations Act” (Act) was amended to clearly and broadly exempt an owner’s interest in a business entity from these Code provisions to effectuate the “pick your partner” principle that allows small businesses to control their ownership. Section 3 of the bill narrows the exemption in the Act to that necessary for “pick your partner,” and sections 1 and 2 codify this narrowed exemption in the Code.

HB 16-1275 Taxation Of Corporate Income Sheltered In Tax Haven
The bill pertains to an affiliated group of corporations filing a combined report. In a combined report filing, the tax is based on a percentage of the entire taxable income of all of the includable corporations, but the tax is assessed only against the corporation or corporations doing business in Colorado. Including more affiliated corporations in the combined report may result in an increase in income subject to tax. There are jurisdictions located outside of the United States with no tax or very low rates of taxation, strict bank secrecy provisions, a lack of transparency in the operation of their tax system, and a lack of effective exchange of information with other countries. There are several common legal strategies for sheltering corporate income in such jurisdictions, often called “tax havens.” Notwithstanding a current requirement in state law that those corporations with 80% or more of their property and payroll assigned to locations outside of the United States be excluded from a combined report, the bill makes a corporation that is incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance an includable C corporation for purposes of the combined report. The bill defines a corporation incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance to mean any C corporation that is incorporated in a jurisdiction that has no or nominal effective tax on the relevant income and that meets one or more of five factors listed in the bill, unless it is proven to the satisfaction of the executive director of the department of revenue that such corporation is incorporated in that jurisdiction for a legitimate business purpose. The bill requires the state controller to credit a specified amount per fiscal year to the state education fund to be used to help fund public school education. The bill requires the secretary of state to submit a ballot question, to be treated as a proposition, at the statewide election to be held in November 2016 asking the voters to: increase taxes annually by the taxation of a corporation’s state income that is sheltered in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance; provide that the resulting tax revenue be used to help fund elementary and secondary public school education; and allow an estimate of the resulting tax revenue to be collected and spent notwithstanding any limitations in section 20 of article X of the state constitution (TABOR).

SB 16-131 Overseeing Fiduciaries’ Management Of Assets
The bill clarifies statutory language concerning the removal of a fiduciary to ensure that a fiduciary’s authority is suspended as soon as a petition to remove the fiduciary is filed. The bill adds a provision to the conservatorship statutes stating that an adult ward or protected person has a right to be represented by a lawyer of their choosing unless the trial court finds that the person lacks sufficient capacity to provide informed consent for representation by a lawyer. The bill states that after a fiduciary receives notice of proceedings for his, her, or its removal, the fiduciary shall not pay compensation or attorney fees and costs from the estate without an order of the court.

SB 16-133 Transfer Of Property Rights At Death
Under current law, a certificate of death, a verification of death document, or a certified copy thereof, of a person who is a joint tenant may be placed of record with the county clerk and recorder of the county in which the real property affected by the joint tenancy is located, together with a supplementary affidavit. The bill removes the requirement that the person who swears to and affirms the supplementary affidavit have no record interest in the real property. The bill includes inherited individual retirement accounts and inherited Roth individual retirement accounts as property exempt from levy and sale under writ of attachment or writ of execution. The bill, which amends provisions concerning determination-of-heirship proceedings, clarifies the definition of “interested person,” so that anyone affected by the ownership of property may commence a proceeding; describes when an unprobated will may be used as part of a proceeding; clarifies notice requirements; and ensures that a judgment and decree will convey legal title as opposed to equitable title. The bill enacts portions of section 5 of the “Uniform Power of Appointment Act,” with amendments.

e-Legislative Report: February 16, 2016

Welcome e-leg report readers to this week’s installment of the world under the Gold Dome. As always, we welcome your feedback, thoughts, comments and questions. This news report is designed to keep you up to date on activities at the capitol that are of interest to the bar association and to lawyers across practice areas.

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me at jschupbach@cobar.org.

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association. Members are welcome to attend the meetings; please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting Update

The following bills were discussed by the LPC. Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

HB 16-1078 Local Government Employee Whistleblower Protection
The bill prohibits a county, municipality, or local education provider from imposing any disciplinary action against an employee on account of the employee’s statements to any person about the local government that the employee reasonably believes to show: a violation of a state or federal law, a local ordinance or resolution, or a local education provider policy; a waste or misuse of public funds; fraud; an abuse of authority; mismanagement; or a danger to the health or safety of students, employees, or the public. The bill permits an employee to file a written complaint with the office of administrative courts, for referral to an administrative law judge, alleging that a local government has imposed disciplinary action that violates this prohibition and seeking injunctive relief and damages. Employees who lose the administrative hearing may file a civil action in district court. The employee protection does not apply if the disclosure was false or made with reckless disregard for the truth or falsity thereof, or if it was of a protected public record or confidential information that was not reasonably necessary to show one or more of the identified circumstances. Administrative law judges are given jurisdiction to hear, determine, and make findings and awards on all these whistleblower cases. The director of the office of administrative courts is required to establish rules to govern these proceedings and hearings.
The LPC voted on the recommendation and request of the Government Counsel and Labor & Employment Law sections to oppose the bill.

HB 16-1154 Employer Definition Clarify Franchisee Status
The bill clarifies that the definition of “employer” only includes a person who possesses authority to control an employee’s terms and conditions of employment and actually exercises that authority directly. The bill specifies that a franchisor is not considered an employer of a franchisee’s employees unless a court finds that a franchisor exercises a type or degree of control over the franchisee or the franchisee’s employees not customarily exercised by a franchisor for the purpose of protecting the franchisor’s trademarks and brand.
The LPC voted to support the bill on the recommendation and presentation of the Franchise subsection of Business Law section.

HB 16-1232 Sunset DOR Private Letter Ruling & General Information Letter
Currently, the executive director of the department of revenue (department), or the executive director’s designee, is charged with issuing, on written request from a taxpayer, private letter rulings (binding determinations regarding the tax consequences of a proposed or completed transaction), and Information letters (nonbinding statements providing general information regarding any tax administered by the department). This duty is currently scheduled to sunset on September 1, 2016. The bill continues the requirement of the department to issue these letters until September 1, 2023. The bill also specifies that the department must track the total state full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel positions necessary and the hours dedicated by each FTE for the issuance, declination, modification, or revocation of all information letters or private letter rulings.
The LPC voted to support the bill and testify in favor of continuing the practice. The bill will be heard in committee next week.

SB 16-115 Electronic Recording Technology Board
The bill creates the electronic recording technology board (board) in the department of state. The board, which is authorized to issue revenue bonds, is established as an enterprise. So long as it constitutes an enterprise, the board is not subject to any provisions of section 20 of article X of the state constitution. The board sunsets in 6 years, but prior to that sunset, it is subject to a sunset review. The board is authorized to impose a surcharge of up to $2 on all documents that a clerk and recorder receives for recording or filing. If imposed, counties are required to collect the surcharge on behalf of the board and transmit it to the state treasurer for deposit in the newly created electronic recording technology fund (fund). The board is required to: develop a strategic plan incorporating the core goals of security, accuracy, sequencing, online public access, standardization, and preservation of public records; determine functionality standards for an electronic filing system that support the core goals; issue a request for proposal for electronic filing system equipment and software that will be available to counties on an optional basis; develop best practices for an electronic filing system; provide training to clerks and recorders related to electronic filing systems; and make grants to counties to establish, maintain, improve, or replace electronic filing systems for documents that are recorded with a clerk and recorder. In awarding grants, the board is required to give priority for grants to counties that do not have sufficient revenue from the surcharge proceeds to maintain their existing electronic filing systems. The money in the fund is continuously appropriated to the board to be used for these purposes. The bill repeals the secretary of state’s powers to ensure uniformity related to electronic filing systems, which powers become the board’s responsibility, and requires the department of state to prepare an annual report that is published online about the grants that the board made in the prior fiscal year. The bill also extends the one-dollar surcharge that a county clerk and recorder is currently required to collect and use for the county’s core or electronic filing system for 9.5 years. The definition of “electronic filing system” is expanded to include elements of the “core filing system,” which term is repealed.
The LPC voted on the recommendation of the Real Estate Section, which has been involved with the creation and drafting of the bill, to support the bill and testify in favor of its passage in committee.

SB 16-043 Student Loans Consumer Protections
The bill prohibits a private educational lender, as defined in the bill, from offering gifts to a covered educational institution, as defined in the bill, including public and private institutions of higher education, in exchange for any advantage or consideration related to loan activities or from engaging in revenue sharing. Further, the bill prohibits persons employed at covered educational institutions from receiving anything of  value from private educational lenders. The bill makes it unlawful for a private educational lender to impose a fee or penalty on a borrower for early repayment or prepayment of a private education loan and requires a lender to disclose any agreements made with a card issuer or creditor for purposes of marketing a credit card. The bill requires private educational lenders to disclose information to a potential borrower or borrower both at the time of application for a private education loan and at the time of consummation of the loan. The required disclosures are described in the bill and include, among other disclosures, the interest rate for the loan and adjustments to the rate, potential finance charges and penalties, payment options, an estimate of the total amount for repayment at the interest rate, the possibility of qualifying for federal loans, the terms and conditions of the loan, and that the borrower may cancel the loan, without penalty, within 3 business days after the date on which the loan is consummated.
The LPC voted to support this bill and to authorize the Juvenile Law section to testify in its favor in committee. This bill would help graduating lawyers, and future graduates, with the debt burden of school.

SB 16-084 Uniform Substitute Health Care Decision-making Documents
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill adopts, with amendments, the “Uniform Recognition of Substitute Health Care Decision-making Documents Act” as Colorado law. The bill establishes the circumstances under which a substitute health care decision-making document (document) is valid in this state. A person may assume in good faith that a document is genuine, valid, and still in effect and that the decision-maker’s authority is genuine, valid, and still in effect. A person who is asked to accept a document shall do so within a reasonable amount of time. The person may not require an additional or different form of document for authority granted in the document presented. A person who refuses to accept a document is subject to a court order mandating acceptance of the document and liability for reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred in an action or proceeding that mandates acceptance of the document. A person is not required to accept a document under certain described conditions.
The LPC voted to remain neutral on the bill, while authorizing the Health Law section to testify as to the specific concerns it raised in the context of medical practices.

SB 16-047 No Detention For Juveniles Who Are Truant
The bill prohibits a juvenile detention facility from receiving or providing care for a juvenile who violates a court order to attend school unless the juvenile is also adjudicated for a delinquent act and remains under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for committing the delinquent act.
The LPC is concerned that the bill, by precluding a court from enforcing its own orders, is likely unconstitutional, and does not allow the judicial branch to complete the requirements and reports that were created by SB 15-184.

SB 16-103 Canadian Domestic Violence Protection Order Enforcement
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill enacts the “Uniform Recognition and Enforcement of Canadian Domestic Violence Protection Orders Act” as recommended by the national conference of commissioners on uniform state laws. The bill allows a peace officer to enforce a Canadian domestic violence protection order. The bill allows a court to enter an order enforcing or refusing to enforce a Canadian domestic violence protection order. The bill provides immunity for a person who enforces a Canadian domestic violence protection order.
The LPC voted to support this bill on the recommendation of the Family Law section.

Updates regarding bills the CBA is currently focused on:

HB 16-1145 Documentary Fee For Residential Real Property
The CBA was able to propose an amendment to the bill that moved us to “neutral” on this bill. It will be heard in committee this week.

SB 16-013 Clean-up Office Of The Child Protection Ombudsman
This sponsor has agreed to remove the language that the CBA was concerned about. With this amendment, the CBA can officially monitor the bill going forward.

SB 16-071 Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act 2015
The LPC asked that this bill be reviewed for comment by the Lawyers Professional Liability Committee. Once that review is complete, the LPC will revisit the act.

SB 16-088 Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access To Digital Asset Act
The CBA voted to support the bill as written and is monitoring the bill for any additional amendments that may impact it.

New Bills of Interest

These are a few new bills recently introduced. They have been sent to CBA sections for review and comment. If you have any questions about these or any other bills, please drop me a line. I’m happy to help you however I can.

SB 16-120 Review By Medicaid Client For Billing Fraud
The bill requires the department of health care policy and financing (department), by a certain date, to develop and implement an explanation of benefits for medicaid recipients. The purpose of the explanation of benefits is to inform a medicaid client of a claim for reimbursement made for services provided to the client or on his or her behalf, so that the client may discover and report administrative or provider errors or fraudulent claims for reimbursement. The bill specifies certain information that must be included in the explanation of benefits. Specifically, the explanation of benefits must include information regarding at least one method for a medicaid client to report errors in the explanation of benefits. The department shall work with medicaid clients and medicaid advocates to develop an explanation of benefits and educational materials that are understandable to medicaid clients. The explanation of benefits must be sent to clients not less than bimonthly, and the department shall determine the most cost-effective means for producing and distributing the explanation of benefits, which means may include e-mail or distribution with existing communications to clients.

HB 16-1258 Court Clerks Posting Of Service
Under current law, if a respondent in a domestic relations action cannot be personally served and is served by publication, the clerk of the court is required to post a copy of the process on a bulletin board in his or her office for 35 days after the date of publication. The bill gives the clerk the option of posting the service online on the court’s website rather than on a bulletin board.

HB 16-1261 Retail Marijuana Sunset
Sunset Process—House Finance Committee. The bill implements the following recommendations from the sunset report for the retail marijuana program: extending the retail marijuana code until September 1, 2019; stating that regulation of labeling, packaging, and testing is a matter of statewide concern; and repealing the following provisions from the retail marijuana code: the requirement that a licensee post a surety bond as condition of licensure; the requirement that the executive director deny a license based on a previous denial at the same location; the proscription on the placement and sale of marijuana-themed magazines; and the authority to promulgate rules prohibiting misrepresentation and unfair practices. The bill creates two new retail marijuana licenses, a retail marijuana transport license and a retail marijuana operator license, and gives the state licensing authority rulemaking authority over those licenses. The bill conforms language in the retail marijuana code to language in the medical marijuana code related to mandatory testing, the confidentiality of licensee information, and limited access areas.

e-Legislative Report: April 22, 2015

legislationCBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

The following bills were discussed at the LPC last week. Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

HB 15-1327—Limit Proxy Marriages To Military & Contractors
Sponsors: Rep. Ginal (D), Rep. Roupe (R) & Sen. Cooke (R), Sen. Garcia (D)
The LPC reviewed this legislation (which had passed through its first committee hearing on Thursday, April 16). The consensus of Bar members and sections weighing in was that this bill was an important tool to fight trafficking and to restrain the statute to its original intent (marriage to military personnel and related contactors). The Bar will work with the sponsors to secure passage as the bill moves forward.

HB 15-1359—Savings Program For Persons With Disabilities
Sponsors: Rep. Danielson (D), Rep. Landgraf (R) & Sen. Kefalas (D), Sen. Martinez Humenik (R)
The LPC voted to support this legislation at the request and analysis of the Elder Law Section. The bill authorizes the Department of Higher Education to set up a 529 like savings program for individuals with disabilities—and parallels work that the section was already doing. This bill is supported by the department, and has a favorable path at this point in the session.

Bills that the LPC is monitoring, watching or working on can be found at this link on Priority Bill Track.

At the Capitol—Week of April 10

HB 15-1218—No Contact With Defense-initiated Victim Outreach 
We reached out to the sponsors to communicate that the CBA supported the American Bar Association’s position on this (and similar bills in other states) Bill was amended and made better. No LPC action needed.

HB 15-1285—Law Enforcement Use Of Body-worn Cameras 

HB 15-1286—Police Misconduct Court Require Prosecution

HB 15-1290—Stop Police Interference Cop Incident Recording
The CBA supports these three bills and they are moving forward in the legislative process. The LPC discussed and reviewed the “police package” of legislation, ultimately taking a position in support of these bills as aligned with the advancement of the practice of law.

SB 15-129—Preserving Parent-Child relationships 
This bill was heard in committee on April 16. The bar, through its Family Law section and the LPC was opposed to the bill insofar as it turned the long standing “best interest of the child standard” on its head—substituting the rights of divorcing parents as the preeminent consideration in awarding parenting time. There wasa great deal of testimony (26 opponents and 17 proponents), and after 7 hours of testimony it was PI’d 9 to 4. The Bar was a key opponent and our testimony was very persuasive.

SB 15-181—Immediate Appeal Order Appointing Receiver
This bill has been calendared in the House. We continue to work to oppose the bill notwithstanding the many amendments that have carved out various constituencies and interests. The position of the Bar is that this is not well crafted legislation—and the wrong approach to addressing a legitimate problem.

New Bill of Interest

There are several new bills introduced each week of the session (even with only two weeks left). This is one that each lawyer will want to be aware of:

HB 15-1371—Exempt Lawyer Trust Acct Funds From Unclaimed Prop
Sponsors: Rep. Pabon (D), Rep. Willett (R) & Sen. Johnston

The bill creates an exemption from the “Unclaimed Property Act” for funds held in Colorado lawyer trust account foundation trust accounts, commonly known as lawyer COLTAF trust accounts.

e-Legislative Report: February 17, 2015

legislationCBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

Meeting held Friday, February 13

SB 15-129 — Preserving Parent-child Relationships
Sponsor: Senator Kevin Lundberg (R)
The LPC voted to oppose this bill in part because of the fundamental way that it changed the presumption of parenting time away from the “best interest of the child” to a different standard more focused on the parents in divorce proceedings. The bill was heard in committee on Wednesday the 11th and was passed on a party line vote after substantial amendments. SB-129 was referred to the Appropriations Committee for consideration of the bill’s fiscal impact.

SB 15-174 — Uniform Substitute Decision Making Documents Act
Sponsor: Senator Patrick Steadman (D)
The LPC voted to oppose this bill. The committee felt that the bill conflicts with existing statute, was unnecessary in many respects and that it potentially created more gaps and questions with existing law than its adoption would solve.

HB 15-1091 — Policies On Juvenile Shackling In Court
Sponsors: Representative Susan Lontine (D), Senator Michael G. Merrifield (D)
The LPC was concerned that while this bill was very well intentioned, it raised significant potential problems with separation of power between the legislative and judicial branches.

At the Capitol: Week of February 9

SB 15-049 — Real Estate Title Vests In Entity Once Formed
Sponsors: Senator Beth Martinez Humenik (R), Representative Jon Keyser (R)
This bill, supported by the Bar, passed through the Senate this past week. It has been assigned to the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee and has not yet been calendared for a hearing.

HB 15-1121 — Wind Energy Generation
Sponsors: Representative Jon Becker (R), Senator Jerry Sonnenberg (R)
The bill, supported by the Bar, also passed through its first chamber (the House) last week. It will next be heard in the Senate, where it has been assigned to the Agriculture, Natural Resources & Energy Committee. It will be heard by that committee on February 19.

SB 15-077 — Parents’ Bill of Rights
Sponsors: Senator Tim Neville (R), Representative Patrick Neville (R)
The bill passed out of the Senate committee hearing on a party line vote, and was debated on the floor. The bill was passed with amendments, and now moves to the House for consideration. It has not been calendared for consideration.

SB 15-042 — Mandatory Reports Of Animal Abuse
Sponsors: Senator Jerry Sonnenberg (R), Representative Jon Becker (R)
This bill was Postponed Indefinitely (killed) in committee. It will not be considered again this year. The CBA was opposed to the legislation.

HB 15-1101 — Public Defender ADC Records Open Records
Sponsors: Representatives Rhonda Fields (D), Polly Lawrence (R)
This bill was Postponed Indefinitely (killed) in committee. It will not be considered again this year. The CBA was opposed to the legislation.

HB 15-1174 — Information Protections Domestic Violence Victims
Sponsors: Representative Terri Carver (R), Senator Laura Woods (R)
The CBA has not taken a position on this bill—though we are working with the sponsors to ensure that the program will work as intended and not harm the real estate transaction process as a result of its adoption or implementation. It is likely that the CBA and its sections will participate in stakeholder groups and work sessions this summer.

New Bills of Interest

Senate

SB 15-177 — HOA Construction Defect Lawsuit Approval Timelines
Sponsors: Brian DelGrosso (R), Mark Scheffel (R), Jonathan Singer (D), Jessie M. Ulibarri (D)
The bill states that when the governing documents of a common interest community require mediation or arbitration of a construction defect claim and the requirement is later amended or removed, mediation or arbitration is still required for a construction defect claim. These provisions are in section 2 of the bill.

Section 2 also specifies that the mediation or arbitration must take place in the judicial district in which the community is located and that the arbitrator must:

  • Be a neutral third party;
  • Make certain disclosures before being selected; and
  • Be selected as specified in the common interest community’s governing documents or, if not so specified, in accordance with the uniform arbitration act.

Section 1 adds definitions of key terms. Section 3 requires that before a construction defect claim is filed on behalf of the association:

  • The parties must submit the matter to mediation before a neutral third party; and The board must give advance notice to all unit owners, together with a disclosure of the projected costs, duration, and financial impact of the construction defect claim, and must obtain the written consent of the owners of units to which at least a majority of the votes in the association are allocated.

Section 4 adds to the disclosures required prior to the purchase and sale of property in a common interest community a notice that the community’s governing documents may require binding arbitration of certain disputes.

House

HB 15-1025 — Competency To Proceed Juvenile Justice System
Sponsors: Representative Paul Rosenthal (D), Senator Linda M. Newell (D)
The bill establishes a juvenile-specific definition of “incompetent to proceed” for juveniles involved in the juvenile justice system, as well as specific definitions for “developmental disability”, “intellectual disability”, “mental capacity”, and “mental disability” when used in this context. The bill clarifies the procedures for establishing incompetency, as well as for establishing the restoration of competency.

HB 15-1216 — Basis For Expert Opinion Testimony
Sponsors: Representative Kevin Priola (R), Senator John Cooke (R)
The bill prohibits a person from testifying concerning the person’s expert opinion unless certain conditions are met.

e-Legislative Report: February 10, 2015

legislationCBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

Meeting held Friday, February 6
The following bills were discussed for action during last Friday’s LPC meeting.  Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

SB 15-042 – Mandatory Reports Of Animal Abuse
(Senator Sonnenberg & Representative J. Becker)
The intent of the sponsors was to criminalize the recording of undercover videos showing animal cruelty in farming practices.  The Bar sections could not support the bill, or a subsequent “strike below”* amendment, because the language was overly broad, potentially unconstitutional and would lead to unintended consequences.  The LPC voted to oppose this bill at the recommendation of the Animal Law and Agricultural Law Sections.

HB 15-1101 – Public Defender ADC Records Open Records
(Representatives Field and Lawrence)
The LPC voted to oppose this bill as well.  The committee was concerned about the impact of Rule 1.6 and the financial impact of the bill to the State.  There was also concern that this bill would open the door for CORA requests of the Judicial Branch – and the potential impact that would have.  The LPC voted unanimously to oppose this bill.

HB 15-1037 – Freedom of Conscience Higher Ed
(Representative Priola & Senator Neville)
This bill was considered at the request of the Civil Rights Committee who presented that the bill was intended to “protect religious freedom and the right of association.”  After some discussion, the LPC voted to take no position on this bill.

At the Capitol: Week of February 2

HB 15-1135 – Terminally Ill Individuals End-of-life Decisions
(Representatives Court and Ginal & Senator Guzman)
HB 1135 was the big bill last week at the capitol.  Testimony began a little after 9:30am and concluded shortly before 10pm!  The emotional level of testimony was compelling.  There were approximately 120 people that signed up to testify for the bill ranging from all types of organizations and all walks of life. Many made passionate testimony on both sides of the bill which was a true indicator that our group made the correct policy decision to fix the issues and then maintain our neutrality. It is an issue that people either feel at a core level to support or they don’t.  The Committee voted to send the bill to the next committee Appropriations.  That motion failed 8-5.  There was a motion to Postpone the bill indefinitely, (passing 9-4) killing the bill for the remainder of the session.

Many Bar sections weighed in on the bill, its technical merits, and the drafting problems of the bill.  While individual sections had vigorous debates on the policy of “death with dignity” or physician assisted suicide, the LPC took no position on the bill itself.

SB 15-077 – Parents’ Bill of Rights
(Senator Neville & Representative Neville)
This Senate Bill sponsored by the father-son legislative team from Jefferson County was heard and passed out of the Senate committee last week.  The bill is set for its key second reading on Wednesday. Senate Bill 77, the so-called “Parents’ Bill of Rights” sponsored by Sen. Tim Neville and Rep. Patrick Neville, would give parents certain rights over the health care, education and mental health care of minor children.  The Bar Association voted to oppose this legislation at its LPC meeting on January 30.

SB 15-049 – Real Estate Title Vests In Entity Once Formed
(Senator Martinez Humenik & Representative Keyser)
This bill – supported by the bar – continues through the legislature on a straightforward course. It has now passed the Senate and will be heard in the Hose Business Affairs and Labor Committee, where Rep. Keyser will be the key sponsor.

HB 15-1121 – Wind Energy Generation
(Representative J. Becker & Senator Sonnenberg)
This Bar supported bill is also progressing through the legislative process.  Representative Becker has successfully completed the House process, and the bill passes to Senator Sonnenberg for the final leg of its legislative journey.

New Bills of Interest

Senate

SB 15-129 – Preserving Parent-child Relationships
(Senator Lundberg)
The bill amends provisions relating to best interests of a child in domestic relations actions and certain other actions in the juvenile code. With respect to such actions, the bill:

Amends the legislative declaration to emphasize the fundamental liberty interest of both parents and children in maintaining the parent-child relationship;

With respect to temporary orders hearings, if there has been a temporary or permanent protection order entered against one or both parties either prior to or in conjunction with the domestic relations action, requires the court to grant an expedited hearing at the request of either party for purposes of modifying provisions in the protection order relating to parenting time, communication, and access to a child. The court shall order substantially equal parenting time and access to the child unless it finds that such orders are clearly not in the child’s best interest. The court shall also enter any orders necessary for the safety of the protected party relating to the restrained party’s parenting time with the child.

Changes the nature of an investigation by a court-appointed child and family investigator (CFI) from evaluation and recommendations to investigation and fact-finding. CFIs will conduct an objective investigation of issues as specifically directed by the court and will provide written factual findings to the court that are supported by credible evidence. A CFI’s report will not make recommendations regarding the allocation of parental responsibilities but will provide the court with the factual findings the court deems necessary to make such determinations.

Amends language in the legislative declaration regarding the allocation of parental rights and responsibilities relating to the best interests of the child. Also, the bill requires the court to allocate substantially equal parenting time unless the court finds that doing so would endanger a child’s physical health or significantly impair the child’s emotional development. In addition, the court shall award mutual decision-making responsibilities with respect to the child unless the court finds that such an order is clearly not in the child’s best interest.

For purposes of temporary orders in a domestic relations action, requires the court to award substantially equal parenting time to the parties unless the court finds that doing so would endanger a child’s physical health or significantly impair the child’s emotional development. In addition, the court shall order mutual decision-making responsibilities unless mutual decision-making is clearly not in the child’s best interest.

Changes the nature of an evaluation by a court-appointed parental responsibilities evaluator to an investigation by a mental health professional. The mental health investigation is limited to mental health diagnoses, assessments of relevant addictions, or other mental health-related issues that are relevant to the court’s allocation of parental responsibilities for the child. The investigator’s report shall contain findings of fact but shall not contain conclusions or recommendations relating to the allocation of parental rights and responsibilities.

Clarifies that the 2-year restriction on filing motions that request a substantial change in parenting time and that also change the party with whom the child resides the majority of the time do not apply to moderate changes to parenting time when the existing parenting time order awarded substantially equal parenting time to the parties; and

Amends the provisions relating to modification of decision-making responsibility for a child from requiring the court to retain the prior decision-maker unless certain criteria are met to permitting the court to change the decision-maker after considering certain criteria, including whether an award of mutual decision-making responsibilities is now in the child’s best interest.

SB 15-174 – Uniform Substitute Decision Making Documents Act
(Senator Steadman)
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill adopts, with amendments, the “Uniform Substitute Decision-making Documents Act” as Colorado law. The bill establishes the circumstances under which a substitute decision-making document (document) executed outside this state is valid in this state. A person may assume in good faith that a document is genuine, valid, and still in effect and that the decision-maker’s authority is genuine, valid, and still in effect. A person who is asked to accept a document shall do so within a reasonable amount of time. The person may not require an additional or different form of document for authority granted in the document presented. A person who refuses to accept a substitute document is subject to:  A court order mandating acceptance of the document; and Liability for reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred in an action or proceeding that mandates acceptance of the document. A person is not required to accept a substitute document under certain described conditions.

House

HB 15-1043 – Felony Offense For Repeat DUI Offenders
(Senators Cooke and Johnson & Representatives McCann and Saine)
Under current law, a DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI is a misdemeanor offense. The bill makes such an offense a class 4 felony if the violation occurred: (1) After 3 or more prior convictions for DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI; vehicular homicide; vehicular assault; or any combination thereof; or (2) not more than 7 years after the first of 2 prior convictions for DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI; vehicular homicide; vehicular assault; or any combination thereof, if the violation included at least one of the following circumstances: One or more persons less than 18 years of age were present in the person’s vehicle at the time of the violation;  In committing the violation, the person caused damage or injury to any property or persons;  After committing the violation, the person fled the scene; or At the time of the violation, or within 2 hours after the violation, the person’s BAC was 0.15 or higher. Under current law, aggravated driving with a revoked license is a class 6 felony. The bill changes the penalty to a class 1 misdemeanor but requires a sentencing court to ensure that an offender spends a minimum of 60 days in the custody of a county jail. Under current law, a person whose privilege to drive was revoked for multiple convictions for any combination of a DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI must hold an interlock-restricted license for at least one year following reinstatement prior to being eligible to obtain any other driver’s license. The bill expands this period to a minimum of 2 years and a maximum of 5 years. The bill repeals provisions relating to the crime of aggravated driving with a revoked license when the offender also commits DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI as part of the same criminal episode. The bill makes conforming amendments.

HB 15-1161 – Public Accommodation First Amendment Rights
(Representative Klingenschmitt)
The bill specifies that neither the civil rights division, the civil rights commission, nor a court with jurisdiction to hear civil actions brought under the public accommodations laws may compel involuntary speech or acts of involuntary artistic expression or involuntary religious expression by a person when such speech or acts of artistic or religious expression would lead to that person directly or indirectly participating in, directly or indirectly supporting, or endorsing or impliedly endorsing an ideology, ceremony, creed, behavior, or practice with which the person does not agree.

HB 15-1189 – Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act
(Representative Keyser & Senator Steadman)
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill enacts the “Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act”, as amended, as Colorado law. The bill sets forth the conditions under which certain fiduciaries may access: The content of an electronic communication of a principal or decedent; A catalog of electronic communications sent or received by a decedent or principal; and  Any other digital asset in which a principal has a right or interest or in which a decedent had a right or interest at death. As to tangible personal property capable of receiving, storing, processing, or sending a digital asset, a fiduciary with authority over the property of a decedent, protected person, principal, or settlor may access the property and any digital asset stored in it and is an authorized user for purposes of computer fraud and unauthorized computer access laws.

“Fiduciary” means a personal representative, a conservator, an agent, or a trustee. A custodian and its officers, employees, and agents are immune from liability for an act or omission done in good-faith compliance with the provisions of the bill.

HB 15-1203 – Concerning earned time for certain offenders serving life sentences as habitual offenders
(Representative Rosenthal & Senator Steadman)
Under current law, an offender who was sentenced to a habitual offender 40-calendar-year life sentence before July 1, 1993, is not accruing earned time. The bill permits those sentenced under those circumstances to accrue earned time.

HB 15-1212 – Authority To Sell State Trust Lands To Local Gov
(Representative KC Becker & Senator Kerr)
In 2010, a law was enacted that allowed the state board of land commissioners (board) to convey land to units of local government if the conveyance would add value to adjoining or nearby state trust property, benefit board operations, or comply with local land use regulations. When enacted, the authority was set to repeal on July 1, 2015. The bill repeals that automatic repeal and makes the board’s authority permanent.

 

*a “Strike Below” amendment essentially replaces the entire bill below the title with an entirely different bill.  In practice this changes almost everything about the bill – but addresses the same topic, allowing for the sponsor to retain his/her bill and to continue working on the topic.  It is generally used when interested parties and stakeholders need a complete rewrite of the bill as originally introduced in ordrr to try and reach consensus.

 

e-Legislative Report: May 12, 2014

Special Issue: End of the 2014 Legislative Session

Just a quick note to readers that the 2nd Regular Session of the 69th General Assembly came to a close on Wednesday, May 7. Please look for “Legislative Highlights” in the July issue of The Colorado Lawyer. In addition, The Colorado Lawyer August issue will contain the “2014 Legislative Update.”

My thanks to all who subscribe to the e-legislative newsletter. We hope that the updates have been useful to you throughout the 2014 legislative session.

Thankfully, for the CBA the year was quite successful. Our sponsored legislation has been approved by the legislature and is either on its way to the governor or has already been signed by him. The CBA continues its reputation for bringing well thought-out legislation that seeks to improve the legal system—for our members as well as the public.

The Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) and in particular the committee chairman and CBA President Terry Ruckriegle, must be commended for their efforts throughout the session; they meet weekly when the legislature is in session to direct our efforts at the legislature. During the “off-session” the LPC meets monthly to reflect on the session just concluded and to prepare for the session that is always around the corner.

A big thank you goes out to all the sections for their work in reviewing, amending, fixing, analyzing, killing, and helping pass numerous bills from January through May.

Our contract lobbyist, Amy Redfern and our lobby firm of Aponté–Busam, do a phenomenal job of representing the CBA at the legislature. Amy’s intellect, experience, and professionalism are tremendous assets to our Association.

A very special note of thanks to my colleague Margaret Haywood, Web & Communications Specialist at the Colorado Bar Association, for her efforts to not only get the e-legislative newsletter published each week, but for her help in making the format attractive to readers.

One last item, if something big should arise over the summer I reserve the right to bring it to your attention through this newsletter.

Have a good summer!

e-Legislative Report: May 5, 2014

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

The LPC met on Friday, May 2 but did not take any positions on any additional bills.

At the Capitol—Week of April 28

A scorecard of the committee and floor work follows.

In the House

Monday, April 28

Passed on 3rd reading.

  • HB 14-1374. Concerning the inclusion of on-demand air carriers in the sales and use tax exemption for certain aircraft. Vote: 64 yes and 1 no.
  • HB 14-1379. Concerning clarifying the application of spousal maintenance statutes. Vote: 64 yes and 1 no.
  • HB 14-1378. Concerning prohibiting the posting of a private image on social media without consent to cause serious emotional distress. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1390. Concerning the legal standing of a member of the public in challenging a violation of the open meetings requirements. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1388. Concerning a civil cause of action for damages that result from an unlawful termination of a pregnancy at any time prior to birth caused by at least reckless conduct without establishing legal personhood at any time prior to a live birth. Vote: 37 yes and 28 no.
  • HB 14-1375. Concerning modifications to statutory provisions governing urban redevelopment to promote the equitable financial contribution among affected public bodies in connection with the tax increment financing of urban redevelopment projects. Vote: 40 yes and 25 no.
  • SB 14-183. Concerning an increase in the maximum term of a business incentive agreement that a local government enters into with a taxpayer who pays business personal property tax. Vote: 63 yes and 2 no.
  • SB 14-171. Concerning the ability of the Colorado new energy improvement district to arrange financing for water conservation fixtures. Vote: 39 yes and 26 no.
  • SB 14-152. Concerning the standardization of financial transaction requirements applicable to insurers. Vote: 63 yes and 2 no.
  • SB 14-173. Concerning the recommendation that certain persons be offered a test for the hepatitis C virus. Vote: 46 yes and 19 no.
  • SB 14-11. Concerning the Colorado energy research authority. Vote: 38 yes and 27 no.
  • SB 14-151. Concerning the use of moneys derived from civil penalties imposed on nursing facilities to fund innovations in nursing home care, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 61 yes and 4 no.
  • SB 14-64. Concerning restricting the use of long-term isolated confinement for inmates with serious mental illness, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 63 yes and 2 no.
  • SB 14-130. Concerning an increase to the personal needs allowance for persons in nursing care facilities, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 64 yes and 1 no.
  • SB 14-157. Concerning the commission of a report by the department of military and veterans affairs that examines the comprehensive value of United States military activities centered in Colorado, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-75. Concerning the registration of motor vehicles for members of the United States armed forces who are deployed outside the United States, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-125. Concerning the regulation of transportation network companies, and, in connection therewith, requiring transportation network companies to carry liability insurance, conduct background checks on transportation network company drivers, inspect transportation network company vehicles, and obtain a permit from the public utilities commission; and making an appropriation. Vote: 60 yes and 5 no.

Wednesday, April 30

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1343. Concerning workers’ compensation coverage for post-traumatic stress disorder for peace officers. Vote: 44 yes, 20 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-144. Concerning extending the commission on family medicine’s support for the development of family medicine residency programs in underserved areas of the state, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 60 yes and 5 no.
  • HB 14-1369. Concerning required licensure for durable medical equipment suppliers, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 48 yes and 17 no.
  • HB 14-1396. Concerning clarification of the authority of persons acting on behalf of the department of public health and environment to administer the medical marijuana registry. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-21. Concerning the treatment of persons with mental illness who are involved in the criminal justice systems, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.

Thursday, May 1

Passed on 3rd reading.

  • SB 14-73. Concerning the state income tax credit for the environmental remediation of contaminated land in the state, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 55 yes and 10 no.
  • SB 14-88. Concerning the creation of the suicide prevention commission, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 45 yes and 20 no.
  • SB 14-115. Concerning procedural requirements applicable to state water plans, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing an appropriation. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-166. Concerning the development of mobile application software in the Colorado office of economic development that users may access to identify local businesses, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 38 yes and 27 no.
  • HB 14-1392. Concerning a prohibition on the use of simulated gambling devices. Vote: 61 yes and 4 no.
  • HB 14-1393. Concerning a clarification regarding the treatment of federal funds for purposes of section 20 of article X of the state constitution. Vote: 58 yes, 6 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-182. Concerning procedures governing discussions by boards of education of school districts while meeting in executive session. Vote: 36 yes, 26 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-162. Concerning quality management programs for emergency medical service providers providing care in the prehospital setting. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-174. Concerning the creation of the prosecution fellowship program. Vote: 48 yes, 14 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-87. Concerning issuance of identification cards to people who are lawfully present in the United States but may have difficulty with certain documentary evidence, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 40 yes, 22 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-133. Concerning the regulation of private investigators by the department of regulatory agencies, and, in connection therewith, making appropriations. Vote: 45 yes, 27 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-164. Concerning aerial firefighting efforts through the division of fire prevention and control in the department of public safety, and, in connection therewith, implementing recommendations made by the division regarding the Colorado firefighting air corps. Vote: 51 yes, 11 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-187. Concerning creation of the Colorado commission on affordable health care to analyze health care costs in Colorado, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 40 yes, 22 no, and 3 no.
  • SB 14-194. Concerning the issuance of identification documents by the department of revenue, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 60 yes, 2 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-118. Concerning improving protections for individuals with disabilities. Vote: 60 yes, 2 no, and 3 excused.

Saturday, May 3

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-212. Concerning clarifying changes to the provisions related to best practices in bond setting. Vote: 39 yes, 25 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-209. Concerning the requirements for permissible investments by insurers in loans secured by interests in real estate. Vote: 62 yes, 2 no, and excused.
  • SB 14-206. Concerning criminal record sealing provisions, and, in connection therewith, relocating the record sealing provisions in a new part, clarifying when an arrest record can be sealed, and making other clarifying changes. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-191. Concerning the procedures for resolution of workers’ compensation claims. Vote: 39 yes, 28 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-184. Concerning oversight of the industrial hemp program. Vote: 64 yes, o no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-186. Concerning the aggregation of efficiency projects in small communities in order to attract private sector investment through performance contracting. Vote: 38 yes, 26 no, and 1 excused.

In the Senate

Monday, April 28

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1216. Concerning required safety markings for certain towers over fifty feet in height that are located in unincorporated areas of the state. Vote: 33 yes, 1 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-159. Concerning implementation of standardized rules for use in processing medical claims, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 24 yes, 10 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1328. Concerning the deployment of broadband into unserved areas of Colorado through grant- making from moneys allocated from the Colorado high cost support mechanism, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 28 yes, 6 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1331. Concerning the regulation of basic local exchange service as it affects effective competition, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 33 yes, 1 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1329. Concerning the exemption of certain internet-protocol-enabled services from oversight by the public utilities commission, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1327. Concerning measures to expand the deployment of communication networks, and, in connection therewith, enacting the “Broadband Deployment Act” and making an appropriation. Vote: 32 yes, 2 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1330. Concerning an update of telecommunications terminology for intrastate telecommunications services. Vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-118. Concerning improving protections for individuals with disabilities. Vote: 22 yes, 12 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1170. Concerning the authority of the state to enter into lease-purchase agreements for the Colorado bureau of investigation’s Pueblo regional office and forensic laboratory, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 23 yes, 11 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-206. Concerning criminal record sealing provisions, and, in connection therewith, relocating the record sealing provisions in a new part, clarifying when an arrest record can be sealed, and making other clarifying changes. Vote: 33 yes, 1 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1072. Concerning an income tax credit for child care expenses paid by a resident individual with a federal adjusted gross income of $25,000 or less, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 23 yes, 11 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1014. Concerning modifications to the job growth incentive tax credit, and, in connection therewith, reducing an appropriation. Vote: 27 yes, 7 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1205. Concerning the veteran’s assistance grant program. Vote: 24 yes, 10 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1211. Concerning ensuring access to quality complex rehabilitation technology in the Medicaid program, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 29 yes, 5 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1011. Concerning the funding of advanced industry economic development programs. Vote: 19 yes, 15 no, and 1 excused.
  • SCR 14-2. Submitting to the registered electors of the state of Colorado an amendment to the Colorado constitution concerning the protection of electronic data from unreasonable searches and seizures. Vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.

Tuesday, April 29

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1322. Concerning the Colorado probate code. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no. CBA-sponsored legislation.
  • HB 14-1323. Concerning restrictions on the ability of a government entity to access an individual’s personal medical information. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1159. Concerning a state sales and use tax exemption for components used in biogas production systems. Vote: 31 yes and 4 no.
  • HB 14-1095. Concerning the Colorado bureau of investigation’s authority to investigate computer crime, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 33 yes and 2 no.
  • SB 14-155. Concerning grant funding for medical marijuana health effects studies. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.

Wednesday, April 30

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-209. Concerning the requirements for permissible investments by insurers in loans secured by interests in real estate. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1353. Concerning powers of appointment. Vote: 34 yes and 1 no. CBA-supported legislation.
  • HB 14-1044. Concerning consequences for a parolee who tampers with an electronic monitoring device that the parolee is required to wear as a condition of parole. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1363. Concerning the nonsubstantive revision of statutes in the Colorado Revised Statutes, as amended, and, in connection therewith, amending or repealing obsolete, imperfect, and inoperative law to preserve the legislative intent, effect, and meaning of the law. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1362. Concerning great-grandparent visitation with great-grandchildren. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1273. Concerning human trafficking, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1269. Concerning the circumstances under which a person who sells items subject to sales tax must collect such sales tax on behalf of the state. Vote: 18 yes and 17 no.
  • HB 14-1359. Concerning medication synchronization for patients who are prescribed multiple medications. Vote: 23 yes and 12 no.
  • SB 14-191. Concerning the procedures for resolution of workers’ compensation claims. Vote: 18 yes and 17 no.
  • HB 14-1278. Concerning continuation of the workers’ compensation accreditation program administered by the division of workers’ compensation, and, in connection therewith, implementing the recommendations of the 2013 sunset report by the department of regulatory agencies. Vote: 22 yes and 13 no.
  • HB 14-1270. Concerning the sunset review of the licensing of pet animal facilities, and, in connection therewith, continuing the licensing functions of the commissioner of agriculture and making substantive changes to the regulatory statutes. Vote: 20 yes and 15 no.
  • HB 14-1333. Concerning the funding of Colorado water conservation board projects, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1119. Concerning an income tax credit for the donation of food to a hunger-relief charitable organization. Vote: 27 yes and 8 no.
  • HB 14-1032. Concerning the provision of defense counsel to juvenile offenders, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote; 28 yes and 7 no.
  • HB 14-1012. Concerning income tax credits that promote investment in Colorado advanced industries, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 21 yes and 14 no.
  • HB 14-1317. Concerning modifications to the Colorado child care assistance program, and, in connection therewith, aligning eligibility and authorization; addressing affordability by reducing copayments; improving provider reimbursement rates; increasing access to quality care; improving technology, infrastructure, and administration; and making an appropriation. Vote: 20 yes and 15 no.
  • HB 14-1356. Concerning an increase in the Colorado oil and gas commission’s penalty authority, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 20 yes and 15 no.
  • SB 14-197. Concerning high-performance transportation enterprise transparency. Vote: 25 yes and 10 no.
  • SB 14-195. Concerning a study of phreatophyte growth along the South Platte River in the aftermath of the September 2013 flood. Vote: 34 yes and 1 no.
  • HB 14-1300. Concerning a 2014-15 state fiscal year general fund transfer to the Colorado state fair authority cash fund to support the state fair’s programs with the state’s 4-H clubs and the Colorado association of the national future farmers of America organization, and, in connection therewith, reducing an appropriation. Vote: 28 yes and 7 no.
  • HB 14-1093. Concerning the establishment of the creative district community loan fund, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 19 yes and 16 no.
  • HB 14-1326. Concerning tax incentives for alternative fuel trucks, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 27 yes and 8 no.
  • HB 14-1310. Concerning the provision of breath-testing devices to law enforcement agencies. Vote: 27 yes and 8 no.
  • SB 14-190. Concerning criminal discovery, and, in connection therewith, creating a statewide discovery sharing system, a criminal discovery surcharge, civil immunity for district attorneys that make a good-faith effort to redact information from discovery documents, and making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-203. Concerning the office of the respondent parents’ counsel in cases of alleged child abuse or neglect. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.

Thursday, May 1

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1303. Concerning the receipt of public testimony from remote locations around the state by legislative committees, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1338. Concerning planning for the effective use of Colorado’s regional centers for persons with intellectual disabilities, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1368. Concerning the transition of youth ages eighteen through twenty-one who have intellectual and developmental disabilities to the adult program of services for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-193. Concerning conforming Colorado law on location information with the Fourth Amendment as interpreted by the United States Supreme Court in United States v. JonesVote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-201. Concerning reestablishing a child protection ombudsman advisory work group to develop a plan for accountable autonomy for the child protection ombudsman program. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1315. Concerning the enactment of certain model acts adopted by the national association of insurance commissioners, and, in connection therewith, enacting the credit for reinsurance model act and the portion of the insurer receivership model act that governs netting agreements. Vote: 34 yes and 1 no.
  • SB 14-212. Concerning clarifying changes to the provisions related to best practices in bond setting. Vote: 27 yes and 8 no.
  • SB 14-208. Concerning the reinstatement of the authority for a veteran who has not been dishonorably discharged to practice professionally. Vote: 33 yes and 2 no.
  • HB 14-1357. Concerning in-home support services provided in the Medicaid program, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 29 yes and 6 no.
  • HB 14-1358. Concerning continuation of in-home support services, and, in connection therewith, authorizing in-home support services for spinal cord injury waiver pilot program participants. Vote: 34 yes and 1 no.
  • HB 14-1348. Concerning an extension of the effective date of the amended “retail sale” sales tax definition adopted in House Bill 13-1295 to take effect only if congress enacts an act that authorizes states to require certain retailers to pay, collect, or remit state or local sales taxes. Vote: 33 yes and 2 no.

Friday, May 2

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1372. Concerning unauthorized advertising for adoption purposes. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1161. Concerning interstate rail service in southern Colorado, and, in connection therewith, creating a commission and a fund for the purposes of encouraging Amtrak to continue its southwest chief rail line service at all current Colorado stops, expanding such service to include a stop in Pueblo, studying the potential benefits of expanding such service to include a stop in Walsenburg, and making an appropriation. Vote: 26 yes and 9 no.
  • HB 14-1173. Concerning continuation of the controlled substances abuse act, and, in connection therewith, the treatment of controlled substances abuse and making an appropriation. Vote: 23 yes and 12 no.
  • HB 14-1283. Concerning modifications to the electronic prescription drug monitoring program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 24 yes and 11 no.
  • SB 14-180. Concerning the Colorado dental health care program for low-income seniors, and, in connection therewith, requiring a post-enactment review of the implementation of this act, and making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 24 yes and 11 no.
  • SB 14-211. Concerning an Alzheimer’s disease center, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1349. Concerning the creation of an exemption from property taxes for qualifying business entities controlled by nonprofit organizations that are formed for the purpose of qualifying for federal tax credits. Vote: 33 yes and 2 no.
  • HB 14-1371. Concerning property taxation of oil and gas leaseholds and lands, and, in connection therewith, specifying that the wellhead is the point of valuation and taxation for such leaseholds and lands. Vote: 34 yes and 1 no.
  • HB 14-1214. Concerning an increase in the penalties for certain offenses committed against an emergency medical service provider, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 33 yes and 2 no.
  • HB 14-1334. Concerning the petroleum cleanup and redevelopment fund. Vote: 33 yes and 2 no.

Stay tuned for 10 Bills of Interest.

 

e-Legislative Report: April 28, 2014

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

The LPC did not meet on Friday, April 25.

At the Capitol—Week of April 21

A scorecard of the committee and floor work follows.

In the House

Monday, April 21

Passed on 3rd reading.

  • SB 14-123. Concerning the authority of the peace officers standards and training board, and, in connection therewith, providing additional rule-making authority; raising the maximum fee for certification and skills exams; allowing awarding grants to nonprofit organizations; denying certification for municipal violations; and making an appropriation. Vote: 36 yes, 26 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-161. Concerning the modernization of provisions of the “Uniform Election Code of 1992” that ensure voter access for eligible electors, and, in connection therewith, reducing the deadline by which a voter registration application must be submitted via certain methods, altering procedures pertaining to national change-of-address searches, allowing emergency ballots to be obtained for nonmedical reasons, amending provisions relating to military and overseas voters, increasing the penalty for providing false residential information, making the aiding or abetting the provision of false residential information a new felony offense, and making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 42 yes, 20 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1357. Concerning in-home support services provided in the Medicaid program, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 48 yes, 14 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1356. Concerning an increase in the Colorado oil and gas commission’s penalty authority, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 40 yes, 22 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1373. Concerning individuals who may claim the property tax exemption for qualifying seniors and disabled veterans. Vote: 58 yes, 4 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1355. Concerning department of corrections reentry initiatives for successful reintegration of adult offenders into the community, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 47 yes, 15 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1334. Concerning the petroleum cleanup and redevelopment fund. Vote: 50 yes, 12 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1311. Concerning the credit against the state income tax for the costs incurred in connection with the preservation of historic structures, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 50 yes, 12 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1368. Concerning the transition of youth ages eighteen through twenty-one who have intellectual and developmental disabilities to the adult program of services for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1310. Concerning the provision of breath testing devices to law enforcement agencies. Vote: 55 yes, 7 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1361. Concerning the authority of the state licensing authority to establish equivalencies for retail marijuana products, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1358. Concerning continuation of in-home support services, and, in connection therewith, authorizing in-home support services for spinal cord injury waiver pilot program participants. Vote: 55 yes, 7 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-154. Concerning funds administered by the division of fire prevention and control in the department of public safety. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-30. Concerning the fee charged to issue a special license plate to a person with a distinguished flying cross that was awarded for valor, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 59 yes, 3 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-51. Concerning access to records relating to the adoption of children, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1044. Concerning consequences for a parolee who tampers with an electronic monitoring device that the parolee is required to wear as a condition of parole. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1371. Concerning property taxation of oil and gas leaseholds and lands, and, in connection therewith, specifying that the wellhead is the point of valuation and taxation for such leaseholds and lands. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1353. Concerning powers of appointment. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1363. Concerning the nonsubstantive revision of statutes in the Colorado Revised Statutes, as amended, and, in connection therewith, amending or repealing obsolete, imperfect, and inoperative law to preserve the legislative intent, effect, and meaning of the law. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1359. Concerning medication synchronization for patients who are prescribed multiple medications. Vote: 58 yes, 4 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1366. Concerning reasonable restrictions on the sale of edible retail marijuana products. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.

Tuesday, April 22

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-92. Concerning the creation of the crime of insurance fraud, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1362. Concerning great-grandparent visitation with great grandchildren. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-49. Concerning endangering public utility transmission, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 64 yes and 1 no.

Thursday, April 24

Passed on 3rd reading.

  • HB 14-1383. Concerning the required number of physicians that must be provided to an injured employee for selection of a treating physician in workers’ compensation cases. Vote: 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • HCR 14-1002. Submitting to the registered electors of the state of Colorado an amendment to the Colorado constitution concerning the petition signatures required for a citizen initiated constitutional amendment, and, in connection therewith, requiring a portion of the petition signatures for the amendment be gathered from voters who reside in each Colorado congressional district, increasing the total number of petition signatures required for the amendment, and excluding the repeal of an amendment passed prior to 2015 from these petition signature requirements. Vote: 47 yes and 18 no.
  • HB 14-1372. Concerning unauthorized advertising for adoption purposes. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.

Friday, April 25

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1360. Concerning the continuation of the regulation of home care agencies by the department of public health and environment, and, in connection therewith, implementing the recommendations of the 2013 sunset report by the department of regulatory agencies, as modified by the legislative sunset committee, and making an appropriation. Vote: 48 yes, 16 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1380. Concerning the Colorado coroners standards and training board, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-117. Concerning the reauthorization of the regulation of real estate appraisers by the board of real estate appraisers through a recreation and reenactment of the relevant statutes incorporating no substantive amendments other than those approved during the first regular session of the 69th general assembly. Vote: 49 yes, 15 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-129. Concerning changes to criminal provisions related to marijuana and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.

In the Senate

Monday, April 21

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1321. Concerning the membership of the Colorado task force on drunk and impaired driving. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1003. Concerning the exemption from state income tax of income that is earned by a nonresident individual working temporarily in the state to assist with disaster emergency relief activities, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1034. Concerning the creation of a wine packaging permit to allow certain alcohol beverage licensees to package wine produced by another wine manufacturer, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1042. Concerning access by birth parents to records relating to the relinquishment of parental rights, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1228. Concerning the repeal of certain requirements for defensive driving schools attended in accordance with a court order resulting from a violation of a law regulating the operation of a motor vehicle, and, in connection therewith, reducing an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1339. Concerning the creation of the hazardous substance site response fund. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-183. Concerning an increase in the maximum term of a business incentive agreement that a local government enters into with a taxpayer who pays business personal property tax. Vote: 34 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-181. Concerning the elimination of the use of automated vehicle identification systems for traffic law enforcement. Vote: 34 yes and 1 no.
  • HB 14-1045. Concerning the continuation of the breast and cervical cancer prevention and treatment program, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 29 yes and 6 no.
  • HB 14-1185. Concerning the issuance of travel insurance policies. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1207. Concerning the creation of the household medication take-back program, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 25 yes and 10 no.
  • HB 14-1006. Concerning the remittance of the marketing and promotion tax collected by lodging establishments in a local marketing district, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 33 yes and 2 no.

Tuesday, April 22

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-12. Concerning increasing the assistance payment for the program for aid to the needy disabled, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 22 yes and 13 no.
  • SB 14-14. Concerning the property-related expense assistance grants for low-income seniors and individuals with disabilities, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 21 yes and 14 no.
  • HB 14-1313. Concerning a requirement that the owner of a pet animal provide a valid rabies vaccination certificate prior to registering the animal with a county. Vote: 23 yes and 12 no.

Wednesday, April 23

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-186. Concerning the aggregation of efficiency projects in small communities in order to attract private sector investment through performance contracting. Vote: 23 yes and 12 no.
  • SB 14-184. Concerning oversight of the industrial hemp program. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1260. Concerning the creation of three mandatory minimum presumptive ranges for defendants convicted of a felony sex offense involving intrusion against a child who is under 12 years of age when the adult defendant is at least 10 years older that has one of the ranges starting at ten years as the minimum in the range, and, in connection therewith, creating an indeterminate lifetime sentence with a mandatory minimum presumptive range of 10 to 16 years for a class 4 felony; a mandatory minimum presumptive range of 18 to 32 years for a class 3 felony; and a mandatory minimum presumptive range of 24 to 48 years for a class 2 felony. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1061. Concerning sentences imposing monetary payments in criminal actions, and, in connection therewith, eliminating prison sentences for persons who are unable to pay criminal monetary penalties. Vote: 34 yes and 1 no.
  • HB 14-1280. Concerning limits on liability for agritourism. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1354. Concerning the ability of a county clerk and recorder to seek judicial review of final action by the secretary of state relating to elections. Vote: 31 yes and 4 no.
  • HB 14-1288. Concerning information available regarding personal belief exemptions to immunization requirements for children prior to attending school. Vote: 19 yes and 16 no.

Friday, April 25

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1347. Concerning statutorily established time periods that are multiples of seven days. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1344. Concerning the use of electronic means to document transactions related to the business of insurance. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1266. Concerning the penalties for certain value-based offenses, and, in connection therewith, reducing an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-194. Concerning the issuance of identification documents by the department of revenue, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1199. Concerning changes to the regulation of consumer goods service contracts, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1162. Concerning protection of the victim of a sexual assault in cases where a child was conceived as a result of the sexual assault, and, in connection therewith, making legislative changes in response to the study by and the report of the recommendations from the task force on children conceived through rape. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1144. Concerning measures to improve the performance of district attorneys, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 33 yes and 2 no.
  • SB 14-3. Concerning child care assistance for working families, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 19 yes and 16 no.
  • SB 14-176. Concerning crimes related to entities that trade in stolen vehicles, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-187. Concerning creation of the Colorado commission on affordable health care to analyze health care costs in Colorado, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 23 yes and 12 no.
  • SB 14-164. Concerning aerial firefighting efforts through the division of fire prevention and control in the department of public safety, and, in connection therewith, implementing recommendations made by the division regarding the Colorado firefighting air corps. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.

Stay tuned for 10 Bills of Interest.

e-Legislative Report: April 14, 2014

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

Friday, April 11
At the request of the Juvenile Law Section, the LPC voted to oppose HB 14-1362. Concerning great grandparent visitation with great-grandchildren. The bill is sponsored by Rep. Dominick Moreno.

At the Capitol—Week of April 7

A scorecard of the committee and floor work follows.

In the House

Monday, April 7

Passed on 3rd reading.

  • HB 14-1013. Concerning the creation of the advanced industries workforce development program, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1061. Concerning sentences imposing monetary payments in criminal actions, and, in connection therewith, eliminating prison sentences for persons who are unable to pay criminal monetary penalties. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1072. Concerning an income tax credit for child care expenses paid by a resident individual with a federal adjusted gross income of $25,000 or less, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 39 yes, 25 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1199. Concerning changes to the regulation of consumer goods service contracts, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 61 yes, 3 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1203. Concerning funding to maintain the infrastructure for the digital trunked radio system, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1173. Concerning continuation of the controlled substances abuse act, and, in connection therewith, the treatment of controlled substances abuse and making an appropriation. Vote: 61 yes, 3 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1283. Concerning modifications to the electronic prescription drug monitoring program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 42 yes, 22 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1009. Concerning changing the wildfire mitigation income tax deduction to the wildfire mitigation income tax credit, and in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 52 yes, 12 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1029. Concerning a recodification of the laws governing reserved parking for persons with disabilities, and in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1278. Concerning continuation of the workers’ compensation accreditation program administered by the division of workers’ compensation, and, in connection therewith, implementing the recommendations of the 2013 sunset report by the department of regulatory agencies. Vote: 51 yes, 13 no, and 12 excused.
  • HB 14-1316. Concerning methods to determine whether disparities involving certain historically underutilized businesses exist within the state procurement process, and, in connection therewith, commissioning a study to make such determination, requiring the department of personnel to track contracts awarded to historically underutilized businesses, and making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-27. Concerning criminal history background checks for professionals who have the authority to appear in court, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 52 yes, 12 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1095. Concerning the Colorado bureau of investigation’s authority to investigate computer crime, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 61 yes, 3 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1266. Concerning the penalties for certain value-based offenses, and, in connection therewith, reducing an appropriation. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1011. Concerning the funding of advanced industry economic development programs. Vote: 39 yes, 25 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1014. Concerning modifications to the job growth incentive tax credit, and, in connection therewith, reducing an appropriation. Vote 51 yes, 13 no, and 1 excused.

Tuesday, April 8

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1273. Concerning human trafficking, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1321. Concerning the membership of the Colorado task force on drunk and impaired driving. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.

Wednesday, April 9

Passed on 3rd reading.

  • HB 14-1330. Concerning an update of telecommunications terminology for intrastate telecommunications services. Vote: 63 yes, 0 no, and 2 excused.
  • HB 14-1327. Concerning measures to expand the deployment of communication networks, and, in connection therewith, enacting the “Broadband Deployment Act.” Vote: 57 yes, 7 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1328. Concerning the deployment of broadband into unserved areas of Colorado through grant-making from moneys allocated from the Colorado high cost support mechanism, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 47 yes, 17 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1127. Concerning disclosure of information for asset recovery, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1338. Concerning planning for the effective use of Colorado’s regional centers for persons with intellectual disabilities, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1211. Concerning ensuring access to quality complex rehabilitation technology in the medicaid program, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 49 yes, 15 no, and 1 excused.

Thursday, April 10

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1354. Concerning the ability of a county clerk and recorder to seek judicial review of final action by the secretary of state relating to elections. Vote: 50 yes and 15 no.
  • HB 14-1159. Concerning a state sales and use tax exemption for components used in biogas production systems. Vote: 54 yes and 11 no.

Friday, April 11

No bills were heard on 3rd Reading.

In the Senate

Monday, April 7

No bills were heard on 3rd Reading.

Tuesday, April 8

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1057. Concerning the Colorado fraud investigators unit. Vote: 30 yes and 5 no.
  • HB 14-1176. Concerning the state audit cycle of the emissions program for motor vehicles. Vote: 20 yes and 15 no.

Wednesday, April 9

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1299. Concerning the repeal of the six-year limitation on applying a salvage brand to a motor vehicle whose cost of being repaired exceeds the value of the vehicle without the recent damage. Vote: 22 yes, 12 no, and 1 excused.

Thursday, April 10

No bills were heard on 3rd Reading.

Friday, April 11

No bills were heard on 3rd Reading.

e-Legislative Report: April 7, 2014

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

The LPC did not meet on Friday, April 4.

At the Capitol—Week of March 31

A scorecard of the committee and floor work follows.

In the House

Monday, March 31

No bills were heard on 3rd reading.

Tuesday, April 1

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1315. Concerning the enactment of certain model acts adopted by the national association of insurance commissioners, and, in connection therewith, enacting the credit for reinsurance model act and the portion of the insurer receivership model act that governs netting agreements. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1313. Concerning a requirement that the owner of a pet animal provide a valid rabies vaccination certificate prior to registering the animal with a county. Vote: 40 yes and 25 no.
  • HB 14-1045. Concerning the continuation of the breast and cervical cancer prevention and treatment program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 50 yes and 15 no.
  • HB 14-1281. Concerning the allowance for terminally ill patients to have access to investigational products that have not been approved by the federal food and drug administration that other patients have access to when they participate in clinical trials. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1302. Concerning the addition of a judgment against a debtor or transferee who acts with actual intent as an available remedy for a creditor in a fraudulent transfer action. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.

Wednesday, April 2

No bills were heard on 3rd reading.

Thursday, April 3

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-135. Concerning the repeal of certain provisions concerning the purchasing of firearms in states that are contiguous to Colorado. Vote: 61 yes, 1 no, and 3 excused.

Friday, April 4

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-103. Concerning the phase-out of the sale of certain low efficiency plumbing fixtures. Vote: 35 yes, 28 no, and 2 excused.
  • HB 14-1001. Concerning the creation of a property tax reimbursement for a taxpayer that owes property tax on property that has been destroyed by a natural cause, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 46 yes, 17 no, and 2 excused.

In the Senate

Monday, March 31

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1195. Concerning the diversion of revenue collected by the division of insurance to cash funds. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.

Tuesday, April 1

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-163. Concerning clarifying changes to provisions related to the sentencing of persons convicted of drug crimes. Vote: 33 yes, 0 no, and 2 excused.
  • SB 14-160. Concerning removing limitations on a transitional living program for a person with a brain injury. Vote: 33 yes, 0 no, and 2 excused.
  • HB 14-1141. Concerning the confidentiality of social security numbers under statutes protecting the privacy of individuals. Vote: 33 yes, 0 no, and 2 excused.

Wednesday, April 2

No bills were heard on 3rd Reading.

Thursday, April 3

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • The Senate spent numerous hours debating various 2nd Reading amendments to HB 14-1336. Concerning the provision for payment of the expenses of the executive, legislative, and judicial departments of the state of Colorado, and of its agencies and institutions, for and during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014, except as otherwise noted—“the Budget bill.”

Friday, April 4

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1282. Concerning the specification of what materials may be provided in a language other than English by an insurer to a customer. Vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1336. Concerning the provision for payment of the expenses of the executive, legislative, and judicial departments of the state of Colorado, and of its agencies and institutions, for and during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014, except as otherwise noted—“the Budget bill.” Vote: 26 yes, 8 no, and 1 excused.

Stay tuned for 10 Bills of Interest.