June 23, 2019

DOR Beneficiary Designation Bill, Medical Marijuana Testing Facility Licensing Bill, and More Signed

On Wednesday, March 23, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed 13 bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 59 bills this legislative session. The bills signed Wednesday include a bill requiring the Department of Revenue to create its own beneficiary designation form for vehicle ownership transfer on death, a bill allowing local licensing authorities to issue medical marijuana testing facility licenses, and more.

  • HB 16-1051 – Concerning the Issuance of Beneficiary Designation Forms to Facilitate the Transfer of Ownership of a Vehicle Upon the Death of an Owner, by Rep. Kevin Van Winkle and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill requires the Department of Revenue to create its own beneficiary designation form for the transfer of vehicle ownership.
  • HB 16-1064 – Concerning Local Licensing of Marijuana Testing Facilities, by Rep. J. Paul Brown and Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill allows a local medical marijuana licensing authority to issue medical marijuana testing facility licenses.
  • HB 16-1091 – Concerning a Change to the Biennial Filing Date for Rate-Regulated Electric Utilities to Submit Their Plans for Transmission Facilities to the Public Utilities Commission and, in Connection Therewith, Deleting the Requirement that the Commission Issue a Final Order within One Hundred Eighty Days After an Application for the Construction or Expansion of Transmission Facilities is Filed, by Reps. Dan Thurlow & Diane Mitsch Bush and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. Current law requires rate regulated electric utilities to submit plans and other documents to the PUC by October 31 of each odd-numbered year. The bill changes the requirement so that the PUC can set the date for plan submission.
  • HB 16-1119 – Concerning a Modification to the Number of Days that an Aircraft May Remain in the State After it is Purchased for Purposes of the Sales and Use Tax Exemption on the Purchase of Certain Aircraft, by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill expands the sales and use tax exemptions for aircraft.
  • SB 16-055 – Concerning the Conduct of Elections to Choose the Board of Directors of a Cooperative Electric Association, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Dominick Moreno. Currently, cooperative electric associations may exempt themselves from regulation by the PUC, and may contract with third parties to collect and count the ballots for board elections. The bill allows the ballots to be mailed directly to the third party.
  • SB 16-063 – Concerning the Authority of a Local Government to Enter Into an Intergovernmental Agreement with an Out-of-State Local Government to Provide Critical Public Services, by Sen. Ellen Roberts and Rep. Edward Vigil. The bill authorizes local governments to contract with local governments in bordering states to provide emergency services.
  • SB 16-089 – Concerning the Establishment of an Alternative Maximum Reserve for the Department of State Cash Fund, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill allows an alternative maximum reserve for the Department of State Cash Fund equal to 16.5 percent of total expenditures plus an amount equal to any unexpended moneys from the previous year.
  • SB 16-090 – Concerning the Ability of the Department of Public Health and Environment to Collect Data on Marijuana Health Effects at a Regional Level, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Dave Young. The bill allows data regarding marijuana health effects to be reported at the regional level instead of only the county level.
  • SB 16-091 – Concerning Timing of the Statewide Discovery Sharing System, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill delays the start of the statewide eDiscovery sharing system from November 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017.
  • SB 16-092 – Concerning the Authorization of the State to Act Pursuant to the Federal “Oil Pollution Act of 1990,” by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill allows money recovered for damages pursuant to the federal Oil Pollution Act to be deposited in the Natural Resource Damage Recovery Fund.
  • SB 16-093 – Concerning Transfer of the Oversight of Independent Living Services from the Department of Human Services to the Department of Labor and Employment, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Dave Young. The bill transfers oversight of independent living services for persons with disabilities to the Department of Labor and Employment.
  • SB 16-095 – Concerning the Five-Year Appropriations Requirement for Bills that Change the Periods of Incarceration in State Correctional Facilities, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Dave Young. The bill modifies the manner in which fiscal notes and appropriations affecting the Department of Corrections are made.
  • SB 16-107 – Concerning the Regulation of Voter Registration Drive Circulators and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring Circulators to Complete Mandatory Training, by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill requires voter registration drive circulators to meet training requirements established by the Secretary of State prior to circulating any voter registration applications.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

e-Legislative Report: February 22, 2016

Welcome e-leg report readers to this week’s installment of the world under the Gold Dome. As always, we welcome your feedback, thoughts, comments and questions. This news report is designed to keep you up-to-date on activities at the capitol that are of interest to the bar association and to lawyers across practice areas.

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me at jschupbach@cobar.org.

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association. Members are welcome to attend the meetings; please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting Update

The following bills were discussed by the LPC on 2.19.16. Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

HB 16-1191 Bill Of Rights For Persons Who Are Homeless
The bill creates the “Colorado Right to Rest Act,” which establishes basic rights for persons experiencing homelessness, including, but not limited to, the right to use and move freely in public spaces without discrimination, to rest in public spaces without discrimination, to eat or accept food in any public space where food is not prohibited, to occupy a legally parked vehicle, and to have a reasonable expectation of privacy of one’s property. The bill does not create an obligation for a provider of services for persons experiencing homelessness to provide shelter or services when none are available.
The LPC considered this bill at the request of the Civil Rights Committee, but took no position on the bill.

HB 16-1110 Parent’s Bill Of Rights
The bill establishes a liberty interest and fundamental right for parents in the care, custody, and control of a parent’s child, restricting governmental entities from infringing on such interests and rights without demonstrating a compelling governmental interest that cannot be accomplished through less restrictive means.
The LPC voted to oppose this bill because it reverses the long-standing policy position of the Colorado Judicial system to act in the best interest of the child.

HB 16-1235 Commissions Evaluating State Judicial Performance
The bill makes revisions to various functions of the state commission on judicial performance (state commission) and the district commissions on judicial performance (district commission), referred to collectively as the “commissions.” The revisions include: changing the makeup of the state commission to include one representative from each judicial district to ensure representation from the entire state; establishing guidelines for when attorneys and nonattorneys are appointed to the state commission by a district commission; not allowing the chief justice to select individuals for the state commission, which reviews the chief justice’s performance; mandating annual public meetings at which the public is invited to attend and confidentially comment on justices and judges; requiring the state commission to obtain and verify required financial disclosures, criminal histories, and driving histories for each justice or judge reviewed by the commissions; requiring judicial evaluations to take place every two years and to be made public at that time; mandating that the commissions make a “do not retain” recommendation when a majority of commissioners determine that it is more probable than not that a justice or judge knowingly committed a dishonest act during the performance of judicial duties, knowingly made inaccurate or insufficient public financial disclosures, or was improperly influenced by a conflict of interest in performing a judicial act; and mandating that the commissions make a “do not retain” recommendation when two-thirds of the attorneys who complete a questionnaire or survey for the commission recommend that the justice or judge not be retained. The bill is funded from any fees and cost recoveries for electronic filings, network access and searches of court databases, electronic searches of court records, and any other information technology services performed pursuant to statute.
The LPC voted to oppose this bill based on the consideration that this is a longstanding and fundamental change that is not in the best interest of the administration of justice in Colorado.

SB 16-085 Uniform Trust Decanting Act
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. “Decanting” is a term used to describe the distribution of assets from one trust into a second trust. The bill enacts the “Colorado Uniform Trust Decanting Act” (Act), which allows a trustee to reform an irrevocable trust document within reasonable limits that ensure the trust will achieve the settlor’s original intent. The Act prevents decanting when it would defeat a charitable or tax-related purpose of the settlor.
The LPC voted to support this Uniform Bill as modified to meet the considerations of Family Law, Trust & Estate and Elder Law sections.

Updates regarding bills the CBA is currently focused on:

SB 16-013 Clean-up Office Of The Child Protection Ombudsman
Senator Newell has pulled the language of concern from the bill.  SB 13 was passed out of committee on Monday.

SB 16-043 Student Loans Consumer Protections
The CBA testified in favor of this bill, at the request of the Colorado Young Lawyers Division. The bill failed to pass out of committee.

SB 16-047 No Detention For Juveniles Who Are Truant
The CBA testified that while detention for truancy is not something the Bar supports as policy, the bill was fundamentally flawed by prohibiting the judicial branch from effecting its own valid orders. Case law from Colorado in the 1990s is directly on point to the Bar’s constitutional concerns.

SB 16-084 Uniform Substitute Health Care Decision-making Documents
The Bar remains neutral on this bill, while the Health Law Section has some concerns and opposition to the language. The bill was heard in committee, but was not voted on. We are waiting for the Senate to take action on the bill.

SB 16-071 Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act 2015
The CBA has not taken a position on this bill. The Department of Regulatory Affairs has some outstanding concerns that they are addressing with the Uniform Law Commission.

SB 16-088 Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access To Digital Asset
This bill, as amended to accommodate both the Trust & Estate and Business Law Sections, is moving through the legislature as anticipated.

SB 16-115 Electronic Recording Technology Board
The bill, which is supported by the Bar and the Real Estate Section, has passed its first two committee hearings and now heads to Senate Appropriations.

HB 16-1051 Forms To Transfer Vehicle Ownership Upon Death
The CBA is working with the sponsors on some amendments for this bill. The bill is now in its second chamber.

HB 16-1078 Local Government Employee Whistleblower Protection
The CBA is working on this bill, which was amended and is now headed to appropriations in the House.

New Bills of Interest

These are a few new bills recently introduced. They have been sent to CBA sections for review and comment. If you have any questions about these or any other bills, please drop me a line. I’m happy to help you however I can.

HB 16-1270 Security Interest Owner’s Interest In Business Entity
Under current law, the “Uniform Commercial Code” (Code) invalidates contractual limits on the transferability of some assets that can be subject to a security interest. In 2006, the “Colorado Corporations and Associations Act” (Act) was amended to clearly and broadly exempt an owner’s interest in a business entity from these Code provisions to effectuate the “pick your partner” principle that allows small businesses to control their ownership. Section 3 of the bill narrows the exemption in the Act to that necessary for “pick your partner,” and sections 1 and 2 codify this narrowed exemption in the Code.

HB 16-1275 Taxation Of Corporate Income Sheltered In Tax Haven
The bill pertains to an affiliated group of corporations filing a combined report. In a combined report filing, the tax is based on a percentage of the entire taxable income of all of the includable corporations, but the tax is assessed only against the corporation or corporations doing business in Colorado. Including more affiliated corporations in the combined report may result in an increase in income subject to tax. There are jurisdictions located outside of the United States with no tax or very low rates of taxation, strict bank secrecy provisions, a lack of transparency in the operation of their tax system, and a lack of effective exchange of information with other countries. There are several common legal strategies for sheltering corporate income in such jurisdictions, often called “tax havens.” Notwithstanding a current requirement in state law that those corporations with 80% or more of their property and payroll assigned to locations outside of the United States be excluded from a combined report, the bill makes a corporation that is incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance an includable C corporation for purposes of the combined report. The bill defines a corporation incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance to mean any C corporation that is incorporated in a jurisdiction that has no or nominal effective tax on the relevant income and that meets one or more of five factors listed in the bill, unless it is proven to the satisfaction of the executive director of the department of revenue that such corporation is incorporated in that jurisdiction for a legitimate business purpose. The bill requires the state controller to credit a specified amount per fiscal year to the state education fund to be used to help fund public school education. The bill requires the secretary of state to submit a ballot question, to be treated as a proposition, at the statewide election to be held in November 2016 asking the voters to: increase taxes annually by the taxation of a corporation’s state income that is sheltered in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance; provide that the resulting tax revenue be used to help fund elementary and secondary public school education; and allow an estimate of the resulting tax revenue to be collected and spent notwithstanding any limitations in section 20 of article X of the state constitution (TABOR).

SB 16-131 Overseeing Fiduciaries’ Management Of Assets
The bill clarifies statutory language concerning the removal of a fiduciary to ensure that a fiduciary’s authority is suspended as soon as a petition to remove the fiduciary is filed. The bill adds a provision to the conservatorship statutes stating that an adult ward or protected person has a right to be represented by a lawyer of their choosing unless the trial court finds that the person lacks sufficient capacity to provide informed consent for representation by a lawyer. The bill states that after a fiduciary receives notice of proceedings for his, her, or its removal, the fiduciary shall not pay compensation or attorney fees and costs from the estate without an order of the court.

SB 16-133 Transfer Of Property Rights At Death
Under current law, a certificate of death, a verification of death document, or a certified copy thereof, of a person who is a joint tenant may be placed of record with the county clerk and recorder of the county in which the real property affected by the joint tenancy is located, together with a supplementary affidavit. The bill removes the requirement that the person who swears to and affirms the supplementary affidavit have no record interest in the real property. The bill includes inherited individual retirement accounts and inherited Roth individual retirement accounts as property exempt from levy and sale under writ of attachment or writ of execution. The bill, which amends provisions concerning determination-of-heirship proceedings, clarifies the definition of “interested person,” so that anyone affected by the ownership of property may commence a proceeding; describes when an unprobated will may be used as part of a proceeding; clarifies notice requirements; and ensures that a judgment and decree will convey legal title as opposed to equitable title. The bill enacts portions of section 5 of the “Uniform Power of Appointment Act,” with amendments.

e-Legislative Report: 2/3/2016

Editor’s Note: Yesterday, we erroneously published an e-Legislative Report from 2015. The current e-Legislative Report is below. We apologize for the confusion.

e-Legislative Report

Hello loyal e-leg report readers, here is this week’s installment of the world under the Gold Dome; as always, we welcome your feedback, thoughts, comments and questions.  This news report is designed to keep you up to date on the activity of interest to the bar, and to lawyers across practice areas that are happening at the Capitol.

Things move pretty fast this time of year, and we’re off to a busy start – the legislature has released over 300 bills for consideration, committees are meeting and negotiations and amendments are happening hundreds of times a day.  The capitol is humming for sure!

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me at jschupbach@cobar.org

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.  Members are welcome to attend the meetings – please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting held Friday, January 29, 2016

The following bills were discussed at the LPC last week.  Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

SB 16-013 Concerning Statutory Changes Related to the Office of the Child Protection

The bill addresses several items in the statutes relating to the office of the child protection ombudsman (office), including:

Clarifying that the child protection ombudsman board’s (board) duties are advisory only;  Shifting the responsibility for accountability in policies and procedures from the board to the office; Clarifying that the ombudsman cannot be subpoenaed by independent parties to testify in personal custody proceedings; and Removing the statutory requirement for an audit of the office by the office of the state auditor but leaving it at the discretion of the legislative audit committee to request such an audit at a future date.

The CBA – through the Legislative Policy Committee is seeking to amend this bill to restore the ability to subpoena the Ombudsman.  This is an important part of the process, and a vital step to access to data that might be otherwise unavailable.

HB 16-1085 Concerning Simplifying the Process for Returning to a Proper Name after Decree of Dissolution

Under current law, a party to a divorce or legal separation may request in the petition that his or her prior name be restored as part of the decree of dissolution or legal separation. This process to restore a prior name does not involve a background check or publication of the name. However, if the party does not change his or her name at the time the decree of dissolution or legal separation is entered, he or she must follow the procedures for a name change under civil law that include a fingerprint-based background check and publication of the name.

Subject to certain conditions, the bill permits a party to a dissolution or legal separation action to request the restoration of his or her prior full name by filing a motion in the court that granted the divorce or legal separation. The ex-parte motion does not require notice to the other party to the divorce or legal separation. The bill includes the requirements for filing the motion and the conditions under which the court must grant the motion.
The bill also clarifies that the provisions of the adult name change statute do not apply to a party to a dissolution or legal separation action who requests restoration of a prior name pursuant to the new statute.

The CBA supports this legislation. We are working with the sponsor with respect to an amendment that would require notice be given to the other party in the dissolution.

Bills that the LPC is monitoring, watching or working on can be found at this link:

http://www.statebillinfo.com/sbi/index.cfm?fuseaction=Public.Dossier&id=21762&pk=996

@ the Capitol – These are the bills we are focused on:

HB 16-1051 Forms To Transfer Vehicle Ownership Upon Death

On and after the effective date of the bill, the department of revenue (department) shall make available a beneficiary designation form (form) that allows the owner or joint owners of a vehicle to arrange to transfer ownership of the vehicle to a named beneficiary upon the death of the owner or upon the death of all joint owners of the vehicle. Upon the death of the owner or of the last surviving joint owner, the beneficiary may present the form to the department and request a new title of ownership of the vehicle in the beneficiary’s name. The request must be accompanied by: Proof of the death of the vehicle’s owner or proof of the death of the last surviving joint owner of the vehicle; and the statutory fee for an application for a certificate of title.

Upon the presentation of a properly executed and notarized form and the accompanying documents and fee, the department, subject to any security interest, shall issue a new certificate of title to the beneficiary.

The transfer of ownership of a vehicle via a form is not considered testamentary and is not subject to the provisions of the “Colorado Probate Code”.
The CBA is working with the sponsor and other attorneys to ensure that the intent of the bill is harmonized with existing laws, and that it will work well once enacted into law.

HB 16-1077 Recreate Statutory Revisions Committee

The statutory revision committee created in 1977 and repealed in 1985, was a standing body tasked with making an ongoing investigation into statutory defects and anachronisms. The bill recreates the committee.  The recreated committee is comprised of 8 members, with the majority and minority party leaders of each chamber of the general assembly appointing 2 members of those bodies. The committee is staffed by the office of legislative legal services, and is charged with: Making an ongoing examination of the common law and statutes of the state and current judicial decisions for the purpose of discovering defects and anachronisms in the law and recommending needed reforms; Receiving, soliciting, and considering proposed changes in the law from legal organizations, public officials, lawyers, and the public generally as to defects and anachronisms in the law; Recommending legislation, from time to time, to effect such changes in the law as it deems necessary in order to modify or eliminate antiquated, redundant, or contradictory laws; and Reporting its findings and recommendations from time to time to the committee on legal services and annually to the general assembly.

The CBA is working with the Sponsors to offer amendments to shape the scope and membership of this committee.  We believe that the members and expertise of the Bar Association can provide value to the committee upon enactment, and into the future, should the bill pass.

HB 16-1145 Documentary Fee For Residential Real Property

Currently, a person filing a real property conveyance document with a county clerk and recorder must pay a documentary fee if the consideration for the conveyance is more than $500. The amount of the fee is based on the consideration paid, which is the total sales price to the purchaser, unless there is evidence of a separate consideration paid for personal property.

For purposes of the documentary fee, the bill changes the determination of the consideration paid for the grant or conveyance of residential real property as follows: Eliminates any reduction for a separate consideration paid for personal property from the total sales price; Generally requires the consideration amount listed on the grant or conveyance document to be used to determine the documentary fee; and If there is no consideration amount or the amount listed on the grant or conveyance document is $500 or less, and there is a related declaration filed, then the total sales price listed on the declaration is used to determine the documentary fee.  The bill also specifies that, unless indicated as commercial or industrial real property at the time of recording, a grant or conveyance is deemed to be of residential real property for the purpose of determining the documentary fee.

The CBA has significant concerns about this bill and the effects it will have upon real property transactions across the state.  We have been working with the stakeholders and sponsors to try and improve the bill, and to try and find a solution to the documentary fee challenges, but without harming other important aspects of property transactions.

SB 16-026 Personal Rights Of Protected Persons

A guardian or conservator shall not restrict a protected person’s right of communication, visitation, or interaction with other persons, including the right to receive visitors, telephone calls, or personal mail, unless such restrictions are authorized by a court order.  A court may issue an order restricting the communications, visitations, or interactions that a person may have with a protected person upon a showing of good cause by a guardian or conservator. In determining whether to issue such an order, the court shall consider certain factors.  An interested person, including the protected person, who reasonably believes that a guardian or conservator has violated a court order or abused his or her discretion in restricting a protected person’s right of communication, visitation, or interaction with other persons may move the court to: Require the guardian or conservator to grant a person access to the protected person; Restrict, or further restrict, a person’s access to the protected person; Modify the guardian or conservator’s duties; or Remove the guardian or conservator.
A guardian or conservator who knowingly isolates a protected person in violation of law or a court order is subject to removal. With certain exceptions, a guardian or conservator shall promptly notify a protected person’s closest known family members and any person designated by the protected person to be notified in the event that the protected person: Changes his or her residence; Resides at a location other than the protected person’s residence for more than 7 days; Is admitted to a medical facility for acute care or
emergency care; or Dies.

The CBA supports the intent and purpose of this legislation.  We offered testimony that outlined our belief that this was a significant bill, outlined some concerns we had for how the bill might not work well with existing statute, and reaffirmed our commitment to continuing our work with the sponsor.

New Bills of Interest

These are a few of the new bills.  They have been sent to our Sections for review and comment.  If you have any questions about these – or any other bills at the legislature, please drop me a line and I’m happy to help you however I can.

HB 16-1115 Prohibition of Sealing Municipal Domestic Violence Convictions

Under current law, conviction records related to municipal offenses are eligible for record sealing. The bill prohibits sealing a municipal assault or battery conviction or any other municipal conviction, if the conviction involves the underlying factual basis of domestic violence.

HB 16-1117 Electronic Recording for Certain Custodial Interrogation

The bill requires all law enforcement agencies to have audio-visual recording equipment available and policies and procedures in place for preserving custodial interrogations by January 1, 2017. A peace officer must record custodial interrogations occurring in a permanent detention facility if the peace officer is investigating a class 1 or 2 felony or a felony sexual assault. A peace officer does not have to record the interrogation if: the defendant requests that the interrogation not be recorded and the defendant’s request is preserved by electronic recording or in writing; The recording equipment fails; The recording equipment is unavailable, either through damage or extraordinary circumstances; Exigent circumstances related to public safety prevent recording; or The interrogation takes place outside of Colorado.

The court may admit evidence from a custodial interrogation that is not recorded. When offering evidence from an unrecorded interrogation, if the prosecution shows by a preponderance of the evidence that one of the exceptions apply or that the evidence is offered as rebuttal or impeachment evidence, the court may admit the evidence without a cautionary instruction. If the prosecution does not meet that burden, the court shall issue a cautionary instruction to the jury after admitting the evidence.

HB 16-1154 Employer Definition Clarify Franchisee Status

The bill clarifies that the definition of “employer” only includes a person that possesses authority to control an employee’s terms and conditions of employment and actually exercises that authority directly. The bill specifies that a franchisor is not considered an employer of a franchisee’s employees unless a court finds that a franchisor exercises a type or degree of control over the franchisee or the franchisee’s employees not customarily exercised by a franchisor for the purpose of protecting the franchisor’s trademarks and brand.