March 24, 2019

Governor Polis Signs First Bills of 2019 Legislative Session Into Law

On Wednesday, February 20, 2019, Governor Polis signed seven bills into law. These bills were the first bills signed during this 2019 legislative session. The bills signed Wednesday are summarized here.

  • HB 19-1005: “Concerning an Income Tax Credit for Certain Early Childhood Educators,” by Reps. Janet Buckner & James Wilson and Sens. Nancy Todd & Kevin Priola. The bill provides an income tax credit to eligible early childhood educators who hold an early childhood professional credential and who, for at least 6 months of the taxable year, are either the head of a family child care home or are employed with an eligible early childhood education program or a family child care home. 
  • HB 19-1015: “Concerning the Recreation of the Colorado Water Institute,” by Rep. Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Joann Ginal. The Colorado water institute was created in 1981 and automatically repealed in 2017. The bill recreates the institute.
  • SB 19-018: “Concerning the Age Requirement to Drive a Commercial Vehicle in Interstate Commerce,” by Sens. Ray Scott & Vicki Marble and Reps. Barbara McLachlan & Lori Saine. The bill authorizes the department of revenue to adopt rules authorizing a person who is at least 18 years of age but under 21 years of age to be licensed to drive a commercial vehicle in interstate commerce if the person holds a commercial driver’s license and operation of a commercial vehicle in interstate commerce by a person in that age range is permitted under federal law.
  • SB 19-021: “Concerning Eliminating the Requirement that the State Board of Health Approve the Retention of Counsel in Certain Circumstances,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Hugh McKean. The bill removes the requirement that the State Board of Health approve the retention of counsel when the executive director of the Department of Public Health and Environment seeks to bring an action to enjoin, prosecute, or enforce public health laws or standards and the local district attorney fails to act.
  • SB 19-028: “Concerning the Authority of Licensing Authorities to Continue to Issue Certain Fermented Malt Beverage Retail Licenses in Rural Areas,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Jeff Bridges and Reps. Hugh McKean & Julie McCluskie. Recent legislation (Senate Bill 18-243) terminated the licensing of retailers to sell fermented malt beverages (formerly known as “3.2 beer” but now including all beer) for consumption on and off a licensed premises, requiring the holder of such a license to combine its renewal application with an application to convert the license into either a license to sell for consumption on the licensed premises or a license to sell for consumption off the licensed premises.The bill lifts the requirement to convert an existing license, and reinstates the availability of new licenses, in specified areas with low populations.
  • SB 19-045: “Concerning Clarifying that Members of the Radiation Advisory Committee are Reimbursed for Expenses Incurred for Authorized Business of the Committee,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill clarifies that members of the radiation advisory committee are reimbursed for necessary and actual expenses incurred in attendance at meetings or for authorized business of the committee.
  • SB 19-058: “Concerning the Enactment of the Colorado Revised Statutes 2018 as the Positive and Statutory Law of the State of Colorado,” by Sen. Pete Lee and Rep. Leslie Herod. This bill enacts the softbound volumes of the Colorado Revised Statutes 2018 and the Special Supplement 2018 as the positive and statutory law of the state of Colorado and establishes the effective date of said publications.

For more information about the signed bills, click here.

Colorado Supreme Court: Social Host Must Have Actual Knowledge that Specific Guest Underage to be Held Liable for Injuries

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in Przekurat v. Torres on Monday, September 10, 2018.

Statutory Construction—Colorado Dram Shop Act.

The supreme court affirmed the judgment of the court of appeals. The court held that, under the plain language of C.R.S. § 12-47-801(4)(a), a social host who provides a place to drink alcohol must have actual knowledge that a specific guest is underage to be held liable for any damage or injury caused by that underage guest.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Bills Signed Regarding Fiduciary Duties of Title Insurance Entities, Public Official Oaths and Affirmations, and More

On Thursday, March 29, 2018, the governor signed 17 bills into law. He also signed 16 bills into law on Monday, April 2, 2018. To date, Governor Hickenlooper has signed 114 bills this legislative session and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Thursday and Monday include a bill concerning the fiduciary duties of title insurance entities with regard to funds held for closing, a bill exempting physicians who treat patients with rare disorders from non-compete agreements, several bills updating outdated statutory language, bills regarding financing broadband for rural areas, a bill requiring reporting when title to a motor vehicle has been transferred, and more. The bills signed Thursday and Monday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1012 – “Concerning Vision Care Plans for Eye Care Services,” by Reps. Jon Becker & Susan Lontine and Sens. Kevin Lundberg & Irene Aguilar. The bill prohibits a carrier or entity that offers a vision care plan from requiring an eye care provider with whom the carrier or entity contracts to provide services at a set fee, charge a person for noncovered services, or participate in a carrier’s other vision plan networks.
  • HB 18-1091 – “Concerning Dementia Diseases, and, in Connection Therewith, Updating Statutory References to Dementia Diseases and Related Disabilities,” by Reps. Susan Beckman & Joann Ginal and Sens. Jim Smallwood & Nancy Todd. The bill updates statutory references to Alzheimer’s and other dementia diseases and reflects that dementia diseases have related disabilities impacting memory and other cognitive abilities.
  • HB 18-1099 – “Concerning Criteria that the Broadband Deployment Board is Required to Develop with Regard to an Incumbent Telecommunications Provider’s Exercise of a Right to Implement a Broadband Deployment Project in an Unserved Area of the State Upon a Nonincumbent Provider’s Application to the Broadband Deployment Board to Implement a Proposed Broadband Deployment Project in the Unserved Area,” by Reps. Marc Catlin & Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill requires that the Broadband Deployment Board’s criteria include requirements that an incumbent telecommunications provider exercising its right to implement a broadband deployment project for the unserved area agree to provide demonstrated downstream and upstream speeds equal to or faster than the speeds indicated in the applicant’s proposed project and at a cost per household that is equal to or less than the cost per household indicated in the applicant’s proposed project.
  • HB 18-1103 – “Concerning the Ability of a Local Government to Require a Driver to Meet Safety Standards for the Use of an Off-highway Vehicle,” by Rep. Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill clarifies that a local government does not violate state rules if it imposes certain requirements on a driver of an off-highway vehicle.
  • HB 18-1130 – “Concerning Increasing the Availability of Qualified Personnel who are Licensed in Another State to Teach in Public Schools,” by Reps. Dave Williams & Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill changes requirements for special education teacher requirements from 3 years of continuous experience to 3 years of experience within the previous 7 years.
  • HB 18-1137 – “Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports to the General Assembly, and, in Connection Therewith, Continuing the Requirements for Reports by the Department of Transportation and the Department of Public Safety,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill continues reporting requirements of the Departments of Transportation and Public Safety.
  • HB 18-1138 – “Concerning Standardizing Public Official Oaths of Office, and, in Connection Therewith, Providing a Uniform Oath Text and Establishing Requirements for Taking, Subscribing, Administering, and Filing Public Oaths of Office,” by Rep. Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill establishes a single uniform text for swearing or affirming an oath of office and the requirements regarding how and when an oath or affirmation of office must be taken, subscribed, administered, and filed.
  • HB 18-1139 – “Concerning the Removal of Outdated Statutory References to Repealed Reporting Requirements that were Previously Imposed on the Parks and Wildlife Commission with Regard to its Rule-making Authority to Set Fees,” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill removes obsolete references to a statutory subsection that was repealed on September 1, 2017.
  • HB 18-1158 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Corrections,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Corrections.
  • HB 18-1171 – “Concerning Adjustments in the Amount of Total Program Funding for Public Cchools for the 2017-18 Budget Year, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing an Appropriation,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill adjusts the minimum amount of total program funding specified in statute to reflect this intent for the actual funded pupil count and the actual at-risk pupil count.
  • HB 18-1196 – “Concerning Authorization to Verify the Disability of an Applicant to the Aid to the Needy Disabled Program,” by Rep. Tony Exum and Sens. Nancy Todd & Beth Martinez Humenik. Under current law, in order to receive assistance under the aid to the needy disabled program, an applicant must be examined by a physician, physician assistant, advanced practice nurse, or registered nurse. The bill adds to the list of persons authorized to perform an examination a licensed psychologist, or any other licensed or certified health care personnel the department of human services deems appropriate.
  • HB 18-1233 – “Concerning a Consumer Reporting Agency’s Placement of a Security Freeze on the Consumer Report of a Consumer who is Under the Charge of a Representative at the Request of the Consumer’s Representative,” by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Polly Lawrence and Sens. Stephen Fenberg & Bob Gardner. The bill authorizes a parent or legal guardian (representative) to request that a consumer reporting agency place a security freeze on the consumer report of either a minor less than 16 years of age or another individual who is a ward of the representative (protected consumer).
  • SB 18-002 – “Concerning the Financing of Broadband Deployment,” by Sens. Don Coram & Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. KC Becker & Crisanta Duran. The bill amends the definition of ‘broadband network’ to increase the speed of downstream broadband internet service from at least 4 megabits per second to at least 10 megabits per second and the definition of ‘unserved area’ to refer to an area that is unincorporated, or within a city with a population of fewer than 7,500 inhabitants, and that is not receiving federal support to construct a broadband network to serve a majority of the households in each census block in the area, and requires the PUC to allocate money.
  • SB 18-028 – “Concerning the Repeal of Certain Requirements for Where a License Plate is Mounted on a Motor Vehicle,” by Sen. Ray Scott and Rep. Jeff Bridges. Current law requires each license plate to be at the approximate center of a motor vehicle and at least 12 inches from the ground. The bill repeals this requirement for the front license plate and replaces it with a requirement that the front license plate be mounted horizontally on the front in the location designated by the manufacturer.
  • SB 18-073 – “Concerning Reporting to the Department of Revenue when Ownership of a Motor Vehicle has been Transferred,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Reps. Kim Ransom & Leslie Herod. The bill creates a voluntary program administered by the Department of Revenue that authorizes the owner of a motor vehicle to report a transfer of ownership of the motor vehicle. If the previous owner reports the transfer to the Department, the previous owner is not subject to liability for the misuse of the vehicle.
  • SB 18-074 – “Concerning Adding Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome to the List of Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities,” by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Chris Hansen. The bill adds Prader-Willi syndrome to the list of persons who have mandatory eligibility for services and supports and also to the definition of an ‘intellectual and developmental disability’ for the purpose of receiving services and supports.
  • SB 18-082 – “Concerning a Physician’s Right to Provide Continuing Care to Patients with Rare Disorders Despite a Covenant Not to Compete,” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Sen. Chris Kennedy. The bill exempts physicians who provide care to patients with rare diseases from non-compete agreements.
  • SB 18-090 – “Concerning ‘Rights of Married Women,'” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modernizes the language in statutory sections concerning the “rights of married women” to be inclusive of married men and women.
  • SB 18-095 – “Concerning the Removal of Statutory References to the Marital Status of Parents of a Child,” by Sens. Rachel Zenzinger & Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Edie Hooten & Hugh McKean. The bill removes or modernizes outdated statutory references to a ‘legitimate’ or ‘illegitimate’ child and a ‘child born out of wedlock’. Colorado only recognizes parentage of a child and acknowledges that the parent and child relationship extends equally to every child and every parent, regardless of the marital status of the parents.
  • SB 18-098 – “Concerning Amending a Statutory Provision Relating to Interest on Damages that was Ruled Unconstitutional by the Colorado Supreme Court,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow. The bill amends C.R.S. § 13-21-101 (1), concerning interest on damages, to reflect a 1996 decision made by the Colorado Supreme Court that ruled certain language in that subsection violated the equal protection clause of the constitution.
  • SB 18-099 – “Concerning the Alignment of Early Childhood Quality Improvement Programs with the Colorado Shines Quality Rating and Improvement System,” by Sens. Michael Merrifield & Kevin Priola and Reps. Brittany Pettersen & James Wilson. The bill amends the application and eligibility requirements for the school-readiness quality improvement program and the infant and toddler quality and availability grant program to align with the Colorado shines quality rating and improvement system to streamline the administration of the programs.
  • SB 18-102 – “Concerning the Requirement for an Odometer Reading when a Motor Vehicle’s Identification Number is Physically Verified,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow. The bill repeals the requirement that the odometer be read when a motor vehicle’s identification number is physically verified.
  • SB 18-104 – “Concerning a Requirement that the Broadband Deployment Board File a Petition with the Federal Communications Commission to Seek a Waiver from the Commission’s Rules Prohibiting a State Entity from Applying for Certain Federal Money Earmarked for Financing Broadband Deployment in Remote Areas of the Nation,” by Sen. Kerry Donovan and Reps. Yeulin Willett & Barbara McLaughlin. The bill requires the broadband deployment board, on or before January 1, 2019, to petition the federal communications commission (FCC) for a waiver from the FCC’s rules prohibiting a state entity from applying for federal money earmarked for broadband deployment in remote areas of the nation through the remote areas fund created as part of the connect America fund established by the FCC.
  • SB 18-111 – “Concerning the Removal of an Obsolete Date in the Law that Designates State Legal Holidays,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Current law specifies that if executive branch employees who are in the state personnel system are required to work on a state legal holiday, the employees shall receive an alternate day off or be paid in accordance with the state personnel system or state fiscal rules in effect on April 30, 1979. The state fiscal rules in effect in 1979 have been amended numerous times since that time and are no longer applicable or relevant. The bill removes the reference to April 30, 1979.
  • SB 18-121 – “Concerning Certain Expenses Allowed to a State Employee when the Employee is Required to Change his or her Place of Residence in Connection with a Change in Job Duties,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Current law allows an employee in the state personnel system his or her moving and relocation expenses if an appointing authority requires the employee to change his or her place of residence due to a change in job duties. The bill specifies that moving expenses, including the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects and the reasonable costs of traveling to a new residence, are reimbursable in accordance with rules promulgated by the state controller and in compliance with the regulations of the federal internal revenue service.
  • SB 18-125 – “Concerning Fiduciary Responsibilities of Title Insurance Entities to Protect Funds held in Conjunction with Real Estate Closing Settlement Services,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Daniel Kagan and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill requires title insurance entities and affiliates or subsidiaries to hold funds belonging to others in a fiduciary capacity. ‘Fiduciary funds’ means all funds received in conjunction with real estate closing and settlement services.
  • SB 18-131 – “Concerning Modifications to the “State Employees Group Benefits Act,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modifies several provisions of the State Employees Group Benefits Act to bring it into compliance with current state and federal law and to eliminate obsolete provisions.
  • SB 18-134 – “Concerning the Exemption of Nonprofit Water Companies from Regulation by the Public Utilities Commission,” by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Under current law, the public utilities commission is directed to grant simplified regulatory treatment to water companies that serve fewer than 1,500 customers. The bill expands on this concept by deregulating water companies that are registered as nonprofits, so long as their rates, charges, and terms and conditions of service are just and reasonable.
  • SB 18-135 – “Concerning Updates to the Colorado Code of Military Justice,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Reps. Terri Carver & Pete Lee. The bill updates several parts of the Colorado Code of Military Justice.
  • SB 18-138 – “Concerning Authorization for Retail Sellers of Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption to Sell Remaining Inventory to Another On-premises Retail Seller of Alcohol Beverages with whom there is Common Ownership when No Longer Licensed to Sell Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Andy Kerr and Reps. Matt Gray & Larry Liston. The bill allows persons with certain retail licenses to purchase alcohol beverages from another retail licensee when there is common ownership between the licensees and the seller has surrendered its license within the last 60 days.
  • SB 18-160 – “Concerning the Authority to Operate Certain Teacher Development Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing Alternative Licensure Programs and Induction Programs,” by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. Under existing law, school districts are permitted to operate induction programs for teachers, special services providers, principals, and administrators, and alternative licensure programs for teachers and principals, who do not hold professional licenses. The bill clarifies that charter schools and the state charter school institute may operate such programs.
  • SB 18-165 – “Concerning Requirements for Public Administrators,” by Sens. Tim Neville & Nancy Todd and Reps. Faith Winter & Lori Saine. The bill The bill increases the amount of bond public administrators are required to maintain to $100,000 and clarifies additional requirements.
  • SB 18-173 – “Concerning the Ability of Certain Establishments Licensed to Sell Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption that Serve Food to Allow a Customer to Remove One Opened Container of Partially Consumed Vinous Liquor from the Licensed Premises,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Rep. Leslie Herod. Currently, certain liquor licensees may sell one opened container of partially consumed vinous liquor to a customer if the licensee has meals available for consumption on the licensed premises. The bill expands the requirement to include licensees that makes sandwiches and light snacks available for consumption on the premises.

For a list of all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

Bills Signed Regarding Appropriating Retail Marijuana Sales Tax to Schools, Clarifying Standard for Deceptive Trade Practices, and More

On Thursday, March 15, 2018, the governor signed 15 bills into law. To date, he has signed 55 bills this legislative session. Many of Thursday’s bills involved the relocation of statutes from Title 12. Some of the other bills signed include a bill to clarify which entities are eligible to apply for special event beverage licenses, a bill appropriating retail marijuana sales tax to schools, a bill changing the date of special district elections to May every-other year, and more. The bills signed Thursday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1027 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of the Lottery from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Cole Wist and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill creates Title 44 and relocates the sections of Title 12 related to the regulation of the lottery to Title 44.
  • HB 18-1028 – “Concerning Clarification of the Standard Required for Applications for a Court Order to Require Compliance with Investigations of Deceptive Trade Practices,” by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Cole Wist and Sens. Lois Court & Jack Tate. The bill would allow a judge to issue a court order if compliance with an investigation is necessary to investigate a deceptive trade practice.
  • HB 18-1039 – “Concerning Changing Regular Special District Elections to May of Each Odd-numbered Year, and, in Connection Therewith, Adjusting the Length of Terms Served by Directors Elected in 2020 and 2022 in Order to Implement the New Election Schedule,” by Rep. Kim Ransom and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill moves regular special district elections to the Tuesday following the first Monday of May in odd-numbered years, rather than the Tuesday immediately succeeding the first Monday of May in every even-numbered year, starting in 2023.
  • HB 18-1087 – “Concerning Department of Public Safety Authority to Repeal Rules Relating to Defunct Boards,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sens. Don Coram & Daniel Kagan. The victims compensation and assistance coordinating committee and the victims assistance and law enforcement advisory board in the department of public safety were repealed in 2009. The bill gives the executive director of the department of public safety the authority to repeal rules relating to those repealed boards.
  • HB 18-1096 – “Concerning the Eligibility of Certain Entities to Apply for a Special Event Permit to Sell Alcohol Beverages,” by Rep. Matt Gray and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill adds to the list of organizations authorized to obtain a special event permit to sell alcohol beverages for a limited period an organization that is incorporated under Colorado law for educational purposes.
  • HB 18-1100 – “Concerning the Continuous Appropriation of Money in the Educator Licensure Cash Fund,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill extends the continuous appropriation of money to the State Board of Education and the Department of Education (Department) for its expenses incurred in the administration of the “Colorado Educator Licensing Act of 1991” for three more years.
  • HB 18-1101 – “Concerning Modification of the Manner in which Gross Retail Marijuana Tax Revenue that is Transferred from the General Fund to the State Public School Fund as Required by Current Law is Appropriated from the State Public School Fund,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. Beginning in the 2018-19 fiscal year, the bill requires 12.59% of the gross retail marijuana sales tax revenue remaining in the general fund after a required allocation of 10% of the revenue to local governments to be transferred to the state public school fund, and continuously appropriates that revenue for the same state fiscal year in which it is transferred from the state public school fund to the department of education to help meet the state share of total program funding for school districts and institute charter schools.
  • HB 18-1140 – “Concerning Public Official Personal Surety Bonds, and, in Connection Therewith, Repealing Obsolete Provisions and Authorizing the Purchase of Insurance in Lieu of Public Official Personal Surety Bonds,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill repeals obsolete provisions related to personal surety bonds and authorizes a public entity to purchase insurance in lieu of a public official personal surety bond and states the requirements for the insurance.
  • SB 18-036 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of Tobacco Sales to Minors from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Daniel Kagan and Rep. Cole Wist. The bill creates Title 44, then relocates the sections of Title 24 regarding the regulation of tobacco sales to minors to Title 44.
  • SB 18-091 – “Concerning Modernizing Terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes Related to Behavioral Health,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill is a follow-up and clean-up to Senate Bill 17-242, which updated and modernized terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes related to behavioral health, including mental health disorders, alcohol use disorders, and substance use disorders.
  • SB 18-092 – “Concerning Updating Statutory References to ‘County Departments of Social Services,'” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modernizes outdated references in statute to “County Department(s) of Social Services,” or similar terms, to “County Department(s) of Human or Social Services.” Counties throughout the state have different ways of referring to the department in the county that does human or social services work, so it is necessary for statute to reflect that not all county departments go by one label.
  • SB 18-094 – “Concerning the Repeal of a Duplicate Definitions Section in Article 60 of Title 27, Colorado Revised Statutes,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill repeals section 27-60-102.5, Colorado Revised Statutes, which is a duplicate definitions section for general provisions related to behavioral health found in article 60 of title 27, Colorado Revised Statutes. The bill leaves in place section 27-60-100.3, Colorado Revised Statutes, enacted by Senate Bill 17-242.
  • SB 18-100 – “Concerning Disclosure of Additional Mandatory Charges by Motor Vehicle Rental Companies,” by Sen. Tim Neville and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Kevin Van Winkle. The bill requires a motor vehicle rental company to disclose to a potential customer, in any vehicle rental cost quote and in the rental agreement, additional mandatory charges applicable to the motor vehicle rental.
  • SB 18-103 – “Concerning the Issuance of Performance-based Incentives for Film Production Activities in the State,” by Sens. Nancy Todd & Jim Smallwood and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Timothy Leonard. The bill strengthens the requirements necessary to earn performance-based incentives for film production activities in the state in various ways.
  • SB 18-164 – “Concerning the Repeal of Reporting Requirements for Certain Unfunded Programs in the Department of Human Services Until Such Time as Funding is Received,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill directs that reporting requirements for programs established in the department of human services that have not received funding in several years be placed on hold until such time as the program receives funding.

For all of the governor’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Signed Regarding Continuation of Family Medical Benefits After Death of State Worker, Creating a Crime of Cruelty to Police Horse, and More

On Wednesday, March 7, 2018, the governor signed 10 bills into law. To date, he has signed 40 bills this legislative session. The bills signed Wednesday included a bill to continue family medical benefits after the death of a state employee, a bill adding free-standing emergency rooms to Colorado’s safe haven laws, a bill creating the crime of cruelty to a working police horse, a bill removing the 30-day waiting period for importation of alcoholic beverages, and more. The bills signed Wednesday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1010 – “Concerning Youth Committed to the Department of Human Services, and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring the Department to Report Certain Data and Adding Members to the Youth Restraint and Seclusion Working Group,” by Reps. Pete Lee & James Wilson and Sen. Don Coram. The bill requires the Department of Human Services to annually collect recidivism data and calculate the recidivism rates and educational outcomes for juveniles committed to the custody of the department who complete their parole sentences and discharge from department supervision.
  • HB 18-1024 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of Racing from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Pete Lee and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill creates Title 44 and moves statutes related to the regulation of racing from title 12 to the new title.
  • HB 18-1026 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of the Law Creating the Liquor Enforcement Division and State Licensing Authority Cash Fund from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Leslie Herod and Sens. John Cooke & Bob Gardner. The bill creates Title 44 and moves statutes creating the liquor enforcement division and state licensing authority cash fund from title 24 to the new title.
  • HB 18-1041– “Concerning Adding Certified Police Working Horses to the Crime of Cruelty to a Service Animal or a Certified Police Working Dog,” by Rep. Marc Catlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill adds a definition for “certified police working horse” to statute and adds certified police working horses to the crime of cruelty to a service animal or a certified police working dog.
  • HB 18-1048 – “Concerning the Expenditure of Money from the Hesperus Account by the Board of Trustees of Fort Lewis College,” by Rep. Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill eliminates the requirement that spending from the Fort Lewis College Hesperus account is subject to an appropriation by the general assembly.
  • HB 18-1105 – “Concerning the Unlicensed Sale of Vehicles,” by Reps. Larry Liston & Jovan Melton and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill clarifies that money received as fines for certain violations may be deposited in the auto dealers license fund.
  • SB 18-025 – “Concerning Modernization of Election Procedures for the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District to Conform with the Current Requirements of State Law,” by Sen. Kevin Priola and Rep. James Coleman. The bill makes several changes to statutory provisions related to flood control district elections.
  • SB 18-050 – “Concerning Including Staff of Free-standing Emergency Facilities as Part of Colorado’s Safe Haven Laws,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Reps. James Coleman & Marc Catlin. The bill expands Colorado’s safe haven laws to include staff members of community clinic emergency centers as persons allowed to take temporary physical custody of infants 72 hours old or younger when the infant is voluntarily surrendered by its parent or parents.
  • SB 18-124 – “Concerning the Removal of the Thirty-day Waiting Period Related to the Sale of Imported Alcohol Beverages,” by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Dan Pabon. Current law requires a manufacturer or importer of imported alcohol beverages to file a statement and notice of intent to import with the state licensing authority at least 30 days before the import or sale of the imported alcohol beverages. The bill removes the 30-day waiting period requirement.
  • SB 18-148 – “Concerning the Continuation of Certain Benefits Through the ‘State Employee Group Benefits Act’ for Dependents of a State Employee who Dies in a Work-related Death,” by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Dominick Moreno and Reps. Polly Lawrence & Tony Exum. The bill specifies that dependents of an employee who dies in a work-related death are automatically qualified for the continuation of dental or medical benefits through the act for 12 months from the end of the month in which the work-related death occurred, so long as the dependents had dental or medical benefits pursuant to the act at the time of the employee’s work-related death.

For all of the governor’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

Bills Signed Allowing Alcohol to be Auctioned at Special Events, Amending Employer Ability to Access FPPA Plans, and More

On Thursday, March 1, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 26 bills into law. To date, he has signed 29 bills this legislative session. Many of the bills signed Thursday were supplemental appropriations bills or bills moving statutes from Title 12, C.R.S., but among the rest were bills allowing the auctioning of alcohol in sealed containers at special events, amending an employer’s ability to access Fire and Police Pension Association plans, and adopting the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact. Summaries of the bills signed Thursday are available here.

  • HB 18-1022 – “Concerning a Requirement that the Department of Revenue Issue a Request for Information for an Electronic Sales and Use Tax Simplification System,” by Reps. Lang Sias & Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sens. Cheri Jahn & Tim Neville. The bill requires the department of revenue to issue a request for information for an electronic sales and use tax simplification system that the state or any local government that levies a sales or use tax, including a home rule municipality and county, could choose to use that would provide administrative simplification to the state and local sales and use tax system.
  • HB 18-1031 – “Concerning Employer Entry into the Fire and Police Pension Association Defined Benefit System,” by Reps. Jovan Melton & Kim Ransom and Sens. John Cooke & Matt Jones. The bill allows an employer that provides a money purchase plan to apply to the board, with a single application, to cover some or all of the existing members of its money purchase plan in the defined benefit system. Current law requires the employer to apply to the board separately for each plan.
  • HB 18-1075 – “Concerning the Enactment of Colorado Revised Statutes 2017 as the Positive and Statutory Law of the State of Colorado,” by Reps. Pete Lee & Leslie Herod and Sens. Daniel Kagan & John Cooke. This bill enacts the softbound volumes of Colorado Revised Statutes 2017, including the corrected replacement volume consisting of titles 42 and 43, as the positive and statutory law of the state of Colorado and establishes the effective date of said publication.
  • HB 18-1079 – “Concerning a Requirement that the Works Allocation Committee Prepare Annual Recommendations for the Use of the Colorado Long-term Works Reserve,” by Rep. Susan Beckman and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill requires the works allocation committee to annually submit to the executive director of the Department of Human Services, the governor, and the joint budget committee recommendations for the use of the money in the Colorado long-term works reserve for the upcoming state fiscal year.
  • HB 18-1144 – “Concerning Certain Publishing Requirements for the Department of Revenue’s ‘Disclosure of Average Taxes Paid’ Table,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill updates language regarding mailing of tax tables, and refers in general to the department’s website and also requires the department to provide the table on the software platform that the department makes available to taxpayers to file individual income taxes rather than refer to the “NetFile” link.
  • HB 18-1159 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Education,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Education.
  • HB 18-1160 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Offices of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and State Planning and Budgeting,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the offices of the governor, lieutenant governor, and state planning and budgeting.
  • HB 18-1161 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing.
  • HB 18-1162 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Human Services,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Human Services.
  • HB 18-1163 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Judicial Department,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Judicial Department.
  • HB 18-1164 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Personnel,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Personnel.
  • HB 18-1165 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Public Safety,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Public Safety.
  • HB 18-1166 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Regulatory Agencies.
  • HB 18-1167 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Revenue,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Revenue.
  • HB 18-1168 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of State,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of State.
  • HB 18-1169 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of the Treasury,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of the Treasury.
  • HB 18-1170 – “Concerning Funding for Capital Construction, and Making Supplemental Appropriations in Connection Therewith,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes supplemental appropriations for capital construction projects.
  • HB 18-1173 – “Concerning a Supplemental Transfer of Money from the General Fund to the Information Technology Capital Account of the Capital Construction Fund for the 2017-18 State Fiscal Year,” by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Kent Lambert. For the 2017-18 fiscal year, the bill transfers $2,888,529 from the general fund to the information technology capital account of the capital construction fund.
  • SB 18-019 – “Concerning an Expansion of the Duration for which the Colorado Water Resources and Power Development Authority may Make a Loan Under the Authority’s Revolving Loan Programs,” by Sens. Kerry Donovan & Don Coram and Reps. Chris Hansen & Jeni James Arndt. Current law limits the duration of any water pollution control loan to 20 years; this bill removes the 20-year limitation.
  • SB 18-027 – “Concerning the Enactment of the ‘Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact’, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Jim Smallwood & Nancy Todd and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Hugh McKean. The bill repeals the current ‘Nurse Licensure Compact’ and adopts the ‘Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact’.
  • SB 18-030 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Self-Propelled Vehicles from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Daniel Kagan and Reps. Mike Foote & Yeulin Willett. The bill creates Title 44 in the Colorado Revised Statutes and relocates certain statutory sections to Title 44.
  • SB 18-032 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & John Cooke and Reps. Mike Foote & Leslie Herod. The bill relocates articles 26 and 26.1 from Title 12 to a new part in Title 18, and relocates the Uniform Unsworn Declarations Act to a new article in Title 13.
  • SB 18-034 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of Gaming from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sens. John Cooke & Lucia Guzman and Reps. Cole Wist & Pete Lee. The bill creates a new Title 44 and relocates certain statutory sections to Title 44.
  • SB 18-035 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Gambling Payment Intercept from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & John Cooke and Rep. Cole Wist. The bill creates Title 44 of the Colorado Revised Statutes and relocates certain statutory sections to Title 44.
  • SB 18-041 – “Concerning the Ability of Operators of Sand and Gravel Mines to Use Water Incidental to Sand and Gravel Mining Operations to Mitigate the Impacts of Mining,” by Sens. Don Coram & Randy Baumgartner and Reps. Lori Saine & Jeni James Arndt. The bill specifies that the groundwater replacement plan or the plan of substitute supply and the permit may authorize uses of water incidental to open mining for sand and gravel, including specifically the mitigation of impacts from mining and dewatering.
  • SB 18-054 – “Concerning a Limitation on the Amount of an Increase in Fees Assessed Against Assisted Living Residences by the Department of Public Health and Environment,” by Sen. Larry Crowder and Rep. Larry Liston. Current law requires the State Board of Health to establish a schedule of fees for health facilities, including assisted living facilities. The bill applies an inflation rate limitation to the fees for assisted living facilities.
  • SB 18-067 – “Concerning the Ability of Certain Organizations Conducting a Special Event to Auction Alcohol Beverages in Sealed Containers for Fundraising Purposes under Specified Circumstances,” by Sens. Rachel Zenzinger & Kevin Priola and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Kevin Van Winkle. The bill specifically allows certain organizations to bring onto and remove from the premises where an event will be held, whether licensed or unlicensed, alcohol beverages in sealed containers that were donated to or otherwise lawfully obtained by the organization and will be used for an auction for fundraising purposes as long as the alcohol beverages remain in sealed containers at all times and the licensee does not realize any financial gain related to the alcohol beverage auction.

For a list of the governor’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Online Travel Companies Not Required to Remit Accommodation Tax to Town of Breckenridge

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Town of Breckenridge v. Egencia, LLC on Thursday, January 25, 2018.

Taxation—Municipalities—Accommodation Tax—Lessors—Renters—Online Travel Companies—Jurisdiction—Exhaustion of Administrative Remedies—Class Certification.

The Town of Breckenridge sought to collect accommodation and sales taxes from 16 online travel companies (OTCs). The OTCs maintain websites through which travelers can book hotel accommodations and travel-related services. As relevant here, under the “merchant model” the OTCs contract with a hotel to allow customers logging into the OTC’s website to book reservations for the hotel. These contracts offer rooms to OTCs at a discounted rate. OTCs coordinate information between travelers and hotels; OTCs neither purchase nor reserve rooms in advance.

Breckenridge brought this action to recover unpaid accommodation and sales taxes from the OTCs, asserting five causes of action. The district court partially granted the OTCs’ motion to dismiss but refused to dismiss the accommodation tax claim. Breckenridge then unsuccessfully sought class certification for 55 home rule cities that also levy a lodger’s or accommodation tax. The parties filed cross-motions for summary judgment, which were resolved in favor of the OTCs.

On appeal, Breckenridge contended that the district court erred in concluding that OTCs are neither “lessors” nor “renters” of hotel rooms because they sell the legal right to use hotel rooms in exchange for consideration. Breckenridge asserted that the OTCs are capable of leasing or renting even without physical possession of hotel rooms. Because the hotels maintain possession of the rooms and are the sole grantors of the right of occupancy, hotels are lessors or renters and OTCs are essentially brokers. The accommodation tax statute indicates that the accommodation tax applies only to those who have a possessory interest in the accommodation being taxed. The OTCs had no possessory interest and were not engaged in the business of owning, operating, or leasing, and could not independently grant customers access to rooms, so they are not subject to Breckenridge’s accommodation tax.

Breckenridge also contended that the court erred in granting summary judgment because issues of fact exist. Breckenridge failed to meet its burden of producing sufficient evidence to establish that a genuine issue of fact exists as to whether OTCs acquire inventory, whether the OTCs provide customer service, and the extent of the hotels’ involvement in merchant model transactions. The court properly granted the OTCs’ summary judgment motion.

Breckenridge also contended that the district court erred in concluding that it lacked subject matter jurisdiction over its sales tax claim because Breckenridge failed to exhaust administrative remedies. Breckenridge argued that it was not required to exhaust its own administrative remedies because doing so would be futile and whether OTCs are subject to sales tax was a question of law not subject to exhaustion requirements. It is evident from the Breckenridge Town Code that a party’s first step in seeking relief for unpaid sales taxes is to petition for administrative review from the finance director. Breckenridge failed to take this step. Therefore, the district court lacked subject matter jurisdiction to address Breckenridge’s unpaid sales tax claim.

Finally, Breckenridge contended that the district court abused its discretion by denying Breckenridge’s request for class certification. Breckenridge was not entitled to class certification under C.R.C.P. 23(b)(2) because Breckenridge was seeking primarily monetary damages, and it failed to meet the C.R.C.P. 23(b)(3) requirements because there was no predominance of common questions nor was class action the superior remedy.

The judgment was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Double Recovery Not Considered in Forum Non Conveniens Determination

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Cox v. Sage Hospitality Resources, LLC on Thursday, May 4, 2017.

Forum Non Conveniens—Judicial Inefficiency—Double Recovery.

Cox, a Colorado resident, stayed at a hotel in California owned by defendant Sage Hospitality Resources, LLC. Sage’s members are Colorado residents, and its principal place of business is in Denver. WS HDM, LLC, incorporated in Delaware and licensed to do business in California, owns and operates the hotel. Cox fell on the hotel property and fractured his femur. Cox sued Sage in Denver District Court and WS HDM in California state court. Sage’s motion to dismiss the action in Denver District Court under the doctrine of forum non conveniens was granted.

On appeal, Cox argued that the Denver District Court erred in granting Sage’s motion to dismiss because there were no unusual circumstances sufficient to overcome the strong presumption in favor of Colorado courts hearing cases brought by Colorado residents. Colorado law is clear that the doctrine of forum non conveniens has “only the most limited application in Colorado courts.” Thus, unless there are “most unusual circumstances,” a Colorado resident’s choice of a Colorado forum will not be disturbed. Cox is a Colorado resident and claims to prefer to sue Sage in Colorado. Even though Cox filed a related suit in California state court, the existence of that lawsuit does not trump Cox’s choice of forum in Colorado. Further, the California state court suit is against a different defendant, and the record does not indicate that the joinder of Sage in Cox’s California state court suit is mandatory. Nor does the risk of double recovery overcome the presumption in favor of Colorado courts hearing suits filed by Colorado resident plaintiffs. The Denver District Court erred in dismissing Cox’s action.

The judgment was reversed and the case was remanded.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Bills Regarding Hearsay Exception, Free Speech on College Campuses, Juvenile Court Jurisdiction, and More Signed

On Tuesday, April 4, 2017, the governor signed 16 bills into law. He also signed 14 bills into law on March 30, and 12 bills on March 23. To date, the governor has signed 122 bills into law.

Some of the bills recently signed include a bill clarifying the hearsay exception for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, a bill correcting the Colorado Uniform Trust Decanting Act, a bill clarifying that a juvenile court has jurisdiction to issue civil protection orders in dependency and neglect cases, a bill clarifying a student’s right to free speech on college campuses, and more. The bills signed since March 23 are summarized here.

April 4, 2017

  • HB 17-1051“Concerning Modernization of the Colorado ‘Procurement Code’,” by Reps. Bob Rankin & Alec Garnett and Sens. Andy Kerr & Don Coram. The bill reviews the entirety of the Colorado Procurement Code and makes several updates in an effort to modernize the Code.
  • HB 17-1101“Concerning the Creation of the Youth Corrections Monetary Incentives Award Program in the Division of Youth Corrections,” by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sens. Nancy Todd & Kevin Priola. The bill authorizes the Division of Youth Corrections to establish, at its discretion, a youth corrections monetary incentives award program. The purpose of the program is to provide monetary awards and incentives for academic, social, and psychological achievement to juveniles who were formerly committed to the Division to assist and encourage them in moving forward in positive directions in life.
  • HB 17-1103“Concerning a State Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Historic Aircraft on Loan for Public Display,” by Reps. Dan Nordberg & Dan Pabon and Sens. Dominick Moreno & Bob Gardner. The bill creates a state sales and use tax exemption for a historic aircraft that is on loan for public display, demonstration, educational, or museum promotional purposes in the state provided certain conditions are met.
  • HB 17-1107“Concerning the Implementation of a New Computer System by the Division of Motor Vehicles to Facilitate the Division’s Administration of the Operation of Motor Vehicles in the State,” by Reps. Dan Thurlow & Jeff Bridges and Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill makes statutory changes regarding implementation of a new computer system.
  • HB 17-1109“Concerning Prosecuting in One Jurisdiction a Person who has Committed Sexual Assaults Against a Child in Different Jurisdictions,” by Reps. Terri Carver & Jessie Danielson and Sens. John Cooke & Rhonda Fields. The bill allows a prosecutor to charge and bring a pattern-offense case for all such assaults in any jurisdiction where one of the acts occurred, rather than prosecuting each act in the jurisdiction in which it occurred.
  • HB 17-1111“Concerning Allowing Juvenile Courts to Enter Civil Protection Orders in Dependency and Neglect Cases,” by Rep. Susan Beckman and Sen. Rhonda Fields. The bill clarifies that the juvenile court has jurisdiction to enter civil protection orders in dependency and neglect actions in the same manner as district and county courts. The court must follow the same procedures for the issuance of the civil protection orders and use standardized forms.
  • HB 17-1149“Concerning Special License Plates Issued to Members of the United States Military who Served in the United States Army Special Forces,” by Reps. Tony Exum & Dafna Michaelson Jenet and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill clarifies which individuals are eligible for a U.S. Army Special Forces license plate.
  • HB 17-1151“Concerning the Regulation of Electrical Assisted Bicycles,” by Reps. Chris Hansen & Yeulin Willett and Sens. Owen Hill & Andy Kerr. The bill defines electrical assisted bicycles and enacts several regulations regarding manufacture, labeling, and government oversight of such bicycles.
  • HB 17-1152: “Concerning the Authority of a Federal Mineral Lease District to Manage a Portion of the Direct Distribution of Money from the Local Government Mineral Impact Fund to Counties for the Benefit of Impacted Areas,” by Reps. Yeulin Willett & Diane Mitsch Bush and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill gives a federal mineral lease district the option to invest a portion of the funding it receives from the local government mineral impact fund in a fund.
  • SB 17-015“Concerning the Unlawful Advertising of Marijuana,” by Sen. Irene Aguilar and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill makes it a level 2 drug misdemeanor for a person not licensed to sell medical or retail marijuana to advertise for the sale of marijuana or marijuana concentrate.
  • SB 17-016“Concerning the Optional Creation of a Child Protection Team by a County,” by Sens. Cheri Jahn & Tim Neville and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Dan Nordberg. The bill allows counties and groups of contiguous counties to choose whether to establish a child protection team, at the discretion of the county director or the directors of a contiguous group of counties.
  • SB 17-048“Concerning Requiring an Officer to Arrest an Offender who Escapes from an Intensive Supervision Program in the Department of Corrections,” by Sen. John Cooke & Rep. Yeulin Willett. The bill requires a peace officer who believes that an offender in an intensive supervision program has committed an escape by knowingly removing or tampering with an electronic monitoring device to immediately seek a warrant for the offender’s arrest or arrest the offender without undue delay if the offender is in the presence of the officer.
  • SB 17-062“Concerning the Right to Free Speech on Campuses of Public Institutions of Higher Education,” by Sen. Tim Neville and Reps. Jeff Bridges & Stephen Humphrey. The bill prohibits public institutions of higher education from limiting or restricting student expression in a student forum, and prohibits those institutions for penalizing free speech.
  • SB 17-066“Concerning Clarifying Retroactively the Authority of a Municipality to Employ a Police Force without Going Through Sunrise Review,” by Sens. Rhonda Fields & John Cooke and Reps. Steve Lebsock & Lori Saine. The bill clarifies that municipalities may employ a police force without going through the review process for groups seeking peace officer status.
  • SB 17-076“Concerning Authority to Spend Money in the Public School Performance Fund,” by Sen. Kevin Priola and Rep. James Coleman. The bill allows the Department of Education to spend money received as gifts, grants, and donations for monetary awards to certain high-performing public schools and in purchasing tangible items of recognition for the schools.
  • SB 17-125“Concerning Allowing Certain Persons who Have Been Exonerated of Crimes to Receive in Lump-Sum Payments Compensation that is Owed to Them by the State,” by Sen. Lucia Guzman and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill allows an exonerated person to elect to receive the remaining balance of the state’s duty of compensation in a lump sum rather than periodic payments.

March 30, 2017

  • HB 17-1059: “Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports by the Department of Public Safety to the General Assembly,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill continues indefinitely statutory reporting requirements.
  • HB 17-1076“Concerning Rule-making by the State Engineer Regarding Permits for the Use of Water Artificially Recharged into Nontributary Groundwater Aquifers,” by Rep. Jeni Arndt and Sens. Stephen Fenberg & Don Coram. The bill adds a requirement that the state engineer promulgate rules for the permitting and use of waters artificially recharged into nontributary groundwater aquifers.
  • HB 17-1147“Concerning Defining the Purposes of Community Corrections Programs,” by Rep. Lang Sias and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill statutorily defines the purpose of community corrections as to further all purposes of sentencing and improve public safety.
  • HB 17-1180: “Concerning Requirements for the Tuition Assistance Program for Students Enrolled in Career and Technical Education Certificate Programs,” by Reps. Faith Winter & Polly Lawrence and Sens. Andy Kerr & Tim Neville. The bill allows students in technical education programs to receive tuition assistance even if they do not meet credit hour requirements for the federal Pell grant program.
  • SB 17-024“Concerning the Hearsay Exception for Persons with an Intellectual and Developmental Disability when a Defendant is Charged with a Crime Against an At-risk Person,” by Sen. Rhonda Fields and Rep. Dave Young. The bill clarifies that the hearsay exception for a person with an intellectual and developmental disability applies if the defendant is charged under the increased penalties for crimes against at-risk persons.
  • SB 17-031“Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports by the Department of Corrections to the General Assembly,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni Arndt. The bill continues indefinitely reporting requirements for the Department of Corrections and makes other changes.
  • SB 17-033“Concerning the Authority of a Professional Nurse to Delegate Dispensing Authority for Over-the-Counter Medications,” by Sen. Irene Aguilar and Rep. Polly Lawrence. The bill allows a professional nurse to delegate to another person, after appropriate training, the dispensing authority of an over-the-counter medication to a minor with the signed consent of the minor’s parent or guardian.
  • SB 17-073“Concerning Promotion of the Runyon-Fountain Lakes State Wildlife Area,” by Sen. Leroy Garcia and Rep. Donald Valdez. The bill directs stakeholders interested in the Runyon-Fountain lakes state wildlife area (including the Colorado division of parks and wildlife, the city of Pueblo, and the Pueblo conservancy district) to cooperatively engage in a long-term process to promote the maximum beneficial development and maintenance of the area.
  • SB 17-110“Concerning Expanding the Number of Unrelated Children to No More than Four to Qualify for License-exempt Family Child Care,” by Sens. Larry Crowder & John Kefalas and Reps. James Wilson & Jessie Danielson. The bill expands the circumstances under which an individual can care for children from multiple families for less than 24 hours without obtaining a child care license.
  • SB 17-122“Concerning the Duties of the Fallen Heroes Memorial Commission, and, in Connection Therewith, Repealing the Commission and Shifting all Remaining Responsibilities to the State Capitol Building Advisory Committee,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Reps. Terri Carver & Jessie Danielson. The bill repeals the fallen heroes memorial commission and requires the state capitol building advisory committee to take on any remaining duties of the commission.
  • SB 17-123“Concerning a High School Diploma Endorsement for Biliteracy,” by Sens. Rachel Zenzinger & Kevin Priola and Reps. James Wilson & Millie Hamner. The bill authorizes a school district, BOCES, or institute charter high school to grant a diploma endorsement in biliteracy to a student who demonstrates proficiency in English and at least one foreign language.
  • SB 17-124“Concerning a Correction to the ‘Colorado Uniform Trust Decanting Act’,” by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Dominick Moreno and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Nordberg. The bill changes one reference to the second trust to the first trust to conform with the Uniform Law Commission’s corrected version of the Act.
  • SB 17-134“Concerning the Exclusion of Certain Areas of an Alcohol Beverage Licensee’s Operation in the Application of Penalties for Certain Violations,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Reps. Dan Nordberg & Leslie Herod. The bill limits penalties for violations relating to the sale of alcohol beverages to a visibly intoxicated or underage person that occur in a sales room for licensees operating a beer wholesaler, winery, limited winery, or distillery, or in a retail establishment, for licensees operating a brew pub, vintner’s restaurant, or distillery pub.
  • SB 17-194“Concerning an Exception to the Statutory Deadlines for Making Income Tax Refunds for Returns Suspected of Refund-related Fraud,” by Sen. Tim Neville and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill specifies that if the department of revenue makes a determination, in good faith, that there is a suspicion of identity theft or other refund-related fraud, then the statutory deadlines do not apply.

March 23, 2017

  • HB 17-1015: “Concerning Clarifying the Manner in Which Reductions of Inmates’ Sentences are Administered in County Jails,” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. John Cooke. The bill clarifies and consolidates various statutory sections concerning reductions of sentences for county jail inmates.
  • HB 17-1040: “Concerning Authorizing the Interception of Communication Relating to a Crime of Human Trafficking,” by Reps. Paul Lundeen & Mike Foote and Sens. Cheri Jahn & Kevin Priola. The bill adds human trafficking to the list of crimes for which a judge can issue an order authorizing the interception of certain communications.
  • HB 17-1044“Concerning Autocycles, and, in Connection Therewith, Clarifying that an Autocycle is a Type of Motorcycle and Requiring Autocycle Drivers and Passengers to Use Safety Belts and, if Applicable, Child Safety Restraints,” by Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill amends the definition of “autocycle” and amends the restraint requirements for autocycles.
  • HB 17-1048“Concerning the Prosecution of Insurance Fraud,” by Rep. Mike Foote and Sen. Jim Smallwood. The bill amends language describing the criminal offense of insurance fraud.
  • HB 17-1065“Concerning a Clarification of Requirements Governing the Formation of Metropolitan Districts, and, in Connection Therewith, Limiting the Inclusion of Agricultural Land Within a Metropolitan District Providing Park and Recreational Services and Clarifying Signature Requirements Governing Judicial Approval of a Petition for Organization of a Proposed Special District,” by Rep. Kimmi Lewis and Sen. Vicki Marble. The bill subjects metropolitan districts to certain limitations regarding parks and recreation and clarifies which signatures can be counted by the district court in determining validity.
  • HB 17-1071“Concerning a Process for Repayment of Certain Criminal Monetary Amounts Ordered by the Court to be Paid Following Conviction,” by Reps. Cole Wist & Pete Lee and Sens. Daniel Kagan & Bob Gardner. The bill establishes a process for a defendant who has paid a monetary amount due for a criminal conviction in a district or county court to request a refund of the amount paid if the conviction was overturned or the restitution award was reversed.
  • HB 17-1092“Concerning Contracts Involving License Royalties with Proprietors of Retail Establishments that Publicly Perform Music,” by Rep. Steve Lebsock and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill expands the law covering contracts between performing rights societies and proprietors of retail establishments to cover investigations and negotiations between the two.
  • HB 17-1133“Concerning the Annual Report on Filing-Office Rules by the Secretary of State,” by Reps. Dan Nordberg & Edie Hooten and Sens. Dominick Moreno & Jack Tate. The bill repeals the requirement that the secretary of state annually report to the governor and legislature regarding filing-office rules promulgated under the “Uniform Commercial Code – Secured Transactions.”
  • HB 17-1136“Concerning Consistent Statutory Language for Electronic Filing of Taxes,” by Rep. Mike Foote and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill changes the EFT and electronic filing requirements in the taxation statutes for consistency, specifying in all cases that the department may require EFT and electronic filing and that the department may promulgate rules to implement EFT and electronic filing.
  • HB 17-1148“Concerning Applications for Registration to Cultivate Industrial Hemp,” by Rep. Jeni Arndt and Sen. John Cooke. The bill adds a requirement to existing registration requirements that applicants to cultivate industrial hemp for commercial purposes provide the names of each officer, director, member, partner, or owner of 10% or more in the entity applying for registration and any person managing or controlling the entity.
  • HB 17-1157“Concerning Reliance by a Financial Institution on a Certificate of Trust,” by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Dan Nordberg and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill requires trustees to provide additional information in a certificate of trust when trustees open a trust deposit account and permits the bank to rely on the certificate of trust absent knowledge of fraud.
  • SB 17-008“Concerning Legalizing Certain Knives,” by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Steve Lebsock. The bill removes gravity knives and switchblades from the definition of illegal weapons.

For a list of the governor’s 2017 legislative decisions, click here.

Mental Health Bill Vetoed; Restaurant Safety Bill Sent to Secretary of State Without Signature

On Thursday, June 9, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper vetoed SB 16-169, “Concerning Changes Related to the Seventy-Two-Hour Emergency Mental Health Procedure.” SB 16-169 would have made several changes to the procedures for 72 hour mental health holds for people who are dangerous to themselves or others, including allowing them to be detained in law enforcement facilities instead of hospitals. The governor vetoed the bill, citing concerns about due process protections for persons having mental health emergencies.

Governor Hickenlooper also sent a bill to the Secretary of State without a signature on Thursday. HB 16-1401, “Concerning the Regulation of Retail Food Establishments,” will become law at 12:01 a.m. on June 11, 2016, and will take effect on August 10, 2016. The bill increases the annual licensing fees paid by retail food establishments beginning January 1, 2017, with provisions for additional fee increases in 2018 and 2019. The bill also creates a new license for a limited retail food establishment that prepares or serves food that does not require time or temperature control for safety, provides self-service beverages, offers prepackaged commercially prepared food and beverages requiring time or temperature control or only reheating commercially prepared foods that require time or temperature control for safety for retail sale to consumers, and requires the CDPHE to ensure significant statewide compliance with the federal Food and Drug Administration’s voluntary National Retail Food Regulatory Program standards. Governor Hickenlooper cited concerns raised by county governments among his reasons for neither signing nor vetoing the bill.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative actions, click here.

SB 16-197: Allowing Liquor-License Drugstores to Open Five Additional Stores on Same License

On April 22, 2016, Sen. Pat Steadman introduced SB 16-197Concerning the Retail Sale of Alcohol Beverages. The bill was assigned to the Senate Business, Labor, & Technology Committee.

The bill establishes a number of requirements with respect to the licensing of alcohol retailers, as well as establishing requirements for the distribution and sale of alcohol by licensed wholesalers, retailers, and their employees.

First, on or after January 1, 2017 and before January 1, 2027, a liquor-licensed drugstore (“LLD”) seeking to obtain an additional LLD license must apply to the state and local licensing authorities, as part of a single application, for a transfer of ownership of two retail liquor stores, a change of location, and a merger and conversion of the two retail liquor stores. A LLD licensee may make said application only if: (1) the LLD pays a minimum purchase price of $350,000 per retail liquor store to acquire ownership of the two licensed retail liquor stores; (2) the two retail liquor stores are located within the same local licensing authority jurisdiction as the premises for which the applicant is seeking a LLD license; and (3) the premises for which the LLD license is sought is not located within 2,500 feet of another licensed premises.

Further, in making its determination on the application, the local licensing authority may consider the reasonable requirements of the neighborhood. A local licensing authority may conduct a hearing on the application for transfer of ownership after notifying the applicant of the hearing at least 10 days before the hearing by posting – or directing the license applicant to post – a notice of the hearing in a conspicuous location on the licensed premises for a least 10 consecutive days before the hearing. A LLD applying for a license merger and conversion is ineligible for a temporary permit, and a local licensing authority shall not issue a temporary permit to a LLD that has acquired ownership of licensed retail stores in accordance with this section of the bill.  The state licensing authority shall establish fees for a transfer or ownership, change of location, and license merger and conversion not to exceed $1000.

Second, a LLD on or after January 1, 2017 shall have a least one permitted manager conduct the LLD’s purchase of alcohol from a licensed wholesaler. The state licensing authority may issue a manager’s permit to an individual who is employed by a LLD and who will be in actual control of the alcohol beverage operations, as long as the individual demonstrates that he or she: (1) has not been convicted of a crime involving the sale or distribution of alcohol within 8 years of submission of the application; (2) has not been convicted of a felony within 5 years of submission of the application; (3) is at least 21 years of age; (4) has not had a manager’s permit or similar permit revoked by the issuing authority within 3 years of submission of the application; and (5) is certified as a responsible alcohol vender. It is unlawful for an individual with a manager’s permit to be directly or indirectly interested in a licensed wholesaler, a licensed manufactured, or any business that has had its license revoked by the state issuing authority within 8 years of submission of the application for a manager’s permit. For each manager’s permit, an annual fee of $100 shall be paid in advance to the Department of Revenue. The state licensing authority shall also establish fees for applications for manager’s permits.

Third, an employee of a LLD who is involved in selling alcohol must obtain and maintain a certification as a responsible alcohol vender. An employee of a LLD who is under 21 years of age shall not have any contact with malt, vinous, and spirituous liquors (“liquors” or “liquor”) offered for sale. A LLD shall not store alcohol off the licensed premises. A LLD shall not comingle the liquors it offers with any other products, and the LLD shall shelve and display the liquors separately from other nonalcoholic beverages.

Fourth, a person licensed to sell malt, vinous, and spirituous liquors (“liquors” or “liquor”) shall: (1) not sell liquors at a price below the cost to purchase the liquors; (2) not allow consumers to purchase liquors at a self-checkout; (3) require purchasers of liquors to present a valid, government-issued identification verifying the purchaser is 21 years of age; and (4) not sell clothing or accessories imprinted with advertising, logos, slogans, trademarks, or messages related to alcoholic beverages. A person licensed on or after January 1, 2017, shall not purchase liquors from a wholesaler on credit, and shall effect payment upon delivery of the liquors.

Fifth, a licensed wholesaler: (1) shall make all deliveries of alcohol to LLD in compliance with the bill; (2) shall take orders for alcohol only from a permitted manager of a LLD; (3) may unload alcohol at a LLD’s loading dock at any time that the location is open to the public; (4) shall make available to all licensed retailers in the state all liquors and brands of alcohol sold by the wholesaler; and (5) may establish purchase requirements, unless the requirements have the effect of excluding a majority of licensed retailers from purchasing a brand of alcohol.

Seventh, in addition to selling liquors, a retail liquor store may sell, without limitation: nonalcoholic beverages; liquor-filled candy; snack food items; kegs and growlers; beer/wine/spirit-making kits and supplies; lemons, limes, cherries, olives, and other food items used in preparing or garnishing alcoholic beverages; clothing or accessories imprinted with advertising, logos, slogans, trademarks, or messages related to alcoholic beverages; lottery tickets; tobacco products; and other merchandise not related to the consumption of alcohol, but only if the annual gross revenues from the sale of such other merchandise does not exceed 20% of the store’s total annual gross revenues. A retail liquor store shall not sell retail marijuana.

Eighth, an owner, part owner, shareholder, or person directly or indirectly interested in a LLD may have an interest in (1) up to five additional LLD licenses if obtained on or after January 1, 2017 and before January 1, 2027, and (2) an unlimited number of additional LLD licenses if obtained on or after January 1, 2027. An owner, part owner, shareholder, or person directly or indirectly interested in a retail liquor store may have an interest in up to five additional retail liquor store licenses.

Tenth, it is unlawful for any licensed retailer: (1) to sell fermented malt beverages to any person between the hours of midnight and 8:00 AM (previously, midnight to 5:00 AM); (2) to employ a person who is at least 18 years of age but under 21 years of age to sell or dispense liquor, unless the employee is supervised by another person who is on the licensed premises and is at least 21 years of age; (3) if licensed as a tavern, retail liquor store, or LLD, to permit an employee who is under 21 years of age to sell liquor; or (4) if licensed as a LLD, to permit an employee who is under 21 years of age to have any contact with liquors offered for sale, or sold and removed from, the licensed premises of the LLD. It is not unlawful for a retail licensee or his or her employee to sell liquor to a consumer who is or reasonably appears to be over the age of 50 and who failed to present identification.

Lastly, the bill removes the requirement that a “fermented malt beverage” be no more than three and two-tenths percent alcohol by weight or four percent alcohol by volume. With respect to “malt liquors,” the bill replaces the requirement that the malt liquor contain no more than three and two-tenths percent alcohol by weight or four percent alcohol by volume with the requirement that the malt liquor contain “not less than one-half of one percent alcohol by volume.”

Max Montag is a 2016 J.D. Candidate at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.

Bills Regarding Name Change After Divorce, Unattended Remote Vehicles, and More Signed

On Thursday, March 31, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed 8 bills into law, and he signed three more bills on Friday, April 1. To date, the governor has signed 70 bills into law this legislative session. The signed bills include a bill to simplify the name change process for parties to dissolutions of marriage or legal separation if those parties did not request a name change during the dissolution proceedings, a bill to change the name of “area vocational schools” to “area technical colleges,” a bill allowing the use of remote starter systems in unattended vehicles, and a bill allowing reimbursement of travel expenses of members of the Colorado Human Trafficking Council.

March 31, 2016

  • SB 16-121 – Concerning the Percentage of Tuition Revenue that an Institution of Higher Education is Authorized to Pledge for Contracts for the Advancement of Money, by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Alec Garnett. The bill allows the governing board of an institution of higher education to pledge up to 100 percent of tuition revenues to fund capital projects.
  • HB 16-1046 – Concerning the Response to Hazardous Substance Incidents Under Designated Emergency Response Authority Responsibility, by Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill requires local governments to report to the Colorado State Patrol who they designate as emergency response personnel for hazardous substance incidents, and narrows the appropriate response.
  • HB 16-1061 – Concerning a Requirement that the Transportation Infrastructure Needs of Federal Military Installations be Given Full Consideration During the Preparation of the Comprehensive Statewide Transportation Plan, by Reps. Terri Carver & Dan Nordberg and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill requires the Colorado Department of Transportation to coordinate with federal military installations within the state when developing statewide transportation plans.
  • HB 16-1082 – Concerning Area Vocational Schools and, in Connection Therewith, Changing the Name of Area Vocational Schools to Area Technical Colleges and Adding Representation for Area Technical Colleges to Certain Boards, by Reps. Alec Garnett & Yeulin Willett and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill changes all statutory references to “area vocational schools” to “area technical colleges” and adds a representative of area technical colleges to the Concurrent Enrollment Advisory Board and the Colorado Workforce Development Council.
  • HB 16-1085 – Concerning Simplifying the Process for Returning to a Prior Name After a Decree of Dissolution or Legal Separation Has Been Entered, by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill makes it easier for a person to restore a previous name after a divorce or separation of he or she did not request the name change during the dissolution or separation proceedings.
  • HB 16-1122 – Concerning the Use of Remote Starter Systems on Unattended Vehicles, by Rep. Justin Everett and Sens. Owen Hill & Vicki Marble. The bill exempts vehicles with remote starter systems from the law prohibiting unattended idling as long as the vehicle owner takes precautions against theft.
  • HB 16-1144 – Concerning Transparency in Postsecondary Courses Offered to High School Students, by Reps. Jon Becker & Brittany Pettersen and Sen. Kevin Grantham. Currently, local education providers are required to notify parents and students annually when qualified students are eligible for concurrent enrollment in high school and college. The bill requires local education providers to notify parents and students if the students’ college classes do not qualify for concurrent enrollment.
  • HB 16-1151 – Concerning the Expansion of Penalty Mitigation Under the Alcohol Beverage Laws for Vendors Meeting the Definition of a “Responsible Vendor” as Provided by Law, by Rep. Dan Pabon and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill requires state and local licensing authorities to consider licensees’ responsible alcohol vendor training as a mitigating factor for certain violations of state liquor laws.

April 1, 2016

  • HB 16-1033 – Concerning the Colorado Human Trafficking Council, by Reps. Beth McCann & Dan Nordberg and Sens. John Kefalas & Linda Newell. The bill allows members of the Colorado Human Trafficking Council to be reimbursed for their travel expenses.
  • HB 16-1038 – Concerning Optional Affiliation with the Fire and Police Pension Association by a County Sheriff Department that Does Not Participate in Social Security, by Reps. Jovan Melton & Joseph Salazar and Sen. Matt Jones. The bill allows counties to elect coverage in the Fire and Police Pension Association even when they decline to participate in Social Security.
  • HB 16-1083 – Concerning the Role and Mission of Western State Colorado University, by Reps. J. Paul Brown & Millie Hamner and Sens. Kerry Donovan & Kevin Grantham. The bill changes the admission standard of Western State Colorado University from “moderately selective” to “selective.”

For all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.