April 19, 2019

e-Legislative Report: April 22, 2015

legislationCBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

The following bills were discussed at the LPC last week. Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

HB 15-1327—Limit Proxy Marriages To Military & Contractors
Sponsors: Rep. Ginal (D), Rep. Roupe (R) & Sen. Cooke (R), Sen. Garcia (D)
The LPC reviewed this legislation (which had passed through its first committee hearing on Thursday, April 16). The consensus of Bar members and sections weighing in was that this bill was an important tool to fight trafficking and to restrain the statute to its original intent (marriage to military personnel and related contactors). The Bar will work with the sponsors to secure passage as the bill moves forward.

HB 15-1359—Savings Program For Persons With Disabilities
Sponsors: Rep. Danielson (D), Rep. Landgraf (R) & Sen. Kefalas (D), Sen. Martinez Humenik (R)
The LPC voted to support this legislation at the request and analysis of the Elder Law Section. The bill authorizes the Department of Higher Education to set up a 529 like savings program for individuals with disabilities—and parallels work that the section was already doing. This bill is supported by the department, and has a favorable path at this point in the session.

Bills that the LPC is monitoring, watching or working on can be found at this link on Priority Bill Track.

At the Capitol—Week of April 10

HB 15-1218—No Contact With Defense-initiated Victim Outreach 
We reached out to the sponsors to communicate that the CBA supported the American Bar Association’s position on this (and similar bills in other states) Bill was amended and made better. No LPC action needed.

HB 15-1285—Law Enforcement Use Of Body-worn Cameras 

HB 15-1286—Police Misconduct Court Require Prosecution

HB 15-1290—Stop Police Interference Cop Incident Recording
The CBA supports these three bills and they are moving forward in the legislative process. The LPC discussed and reviewed the “police package” of legislation, ultimately taking a position in support of these bills as aligned with the advancement of the practice of law.

SB 15-129—Preserving Parent-Child relationships 
This bill was heard in committee on April 16. The bar, through its Family Law section and the LPC was opposed to the bill insofar as it turned the long standing “best interest of the child standard” on its head—substituting the rights of divorcing parents as the preeminent consideration in awarding parenting time. There wasa great deal of testimony (26 opponents and 17 proponents), and after 7 hours of testimony it was PI’d 9 to 4. The Bar was a key opponent and our testimony was very persuasive.

SB 15-181—Immediate Appeal Order Appointing Receiver
This bill has been calendared in the House. We continue to work to oppose the bill notwithstanding the many amendments that have carved out various constituencies and interests. The position of the Bar is that this is not well crafted legislation—and the wrong approach to addressing a legitimate problem.

New Bill of Interest

There are several new bills introduced each week of the session (even with only two weeks left). This is one that each lawyer will want to be aware of:

HB 15-1371—Exempt Lawyer Trust Acct Funds From Unclaimed Prop
Sponsors: Rep. Pabon (D), Rep. Willett (R) & Sen. Johnston

The bill creates an exemption from the “Unclaimed Property Act” for funds held in Colorado lawyer trust account foundation trust accounts, commonly known as lawyer COLTAF trust accounts.

e-Legislative Report: February 10, 2015

legislationCBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

Meeting held Friday, February 6
The following bills were discussed for action during last Friday’s LPC meeting.  Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

SB 15-042 – Mandatory Reports Of Animal Abuse
(Senator Sonnenberg & Representative J. Becker)
The intent of the sponsors was to criminalize the recording of undercover videos showing animal cruelty in farming practices.  The Bar sections could not support the bill, or a subsequent “strike below”* amendment, because the language was overly broad, potentially unconstitutional and would lead to unintended consequences.  The LPC voted to oppose this bill at the recommendation of the Animal Law and Agricultural Law Sections.

HB 15-1101 – Public Defender ADC Records Open Records
(Representatives Field and Lawrence)
The LPC voted to oppose this bill as well.  The committee was concerned about the impact of Rule 1.6 and the financial impact of the bill to the State.  There was also concern that this bill would open the door for CORA requests of the Judicial Branch – and the potential impact that would have.  The LPC voted unanimously to oppose this bill.

HB 15-1037 – Freedom of Conscience Higher Ed
(Representative Priola & Senator Neville)
This bill was considered at the request of the Civil Rights Committee who presented that the bill was intended to “protect religious freedom and the right of association.”  After some discussion, the LPC voted to take no position on this bill.

At the Capitol: Week of February 2

HB 15-1135 – Terminally Ill Individuals End-of-life Decisions
(Representatives Court and Ginal & Senator Guzman)
HB 1135 was the big bill last week at the capitol.  Testimony began a little after 9:30am and concluded shortly before 10pm!  The emotional level of testimony was compelling.  There were approximately 120 people that signed up to testify for the bill ranging from all types of organizations and all walks of life. Many made passionate testimony on both sides of the bill which was a true indicator that our group made the correct policy decision to fix the issues and then maintain our neutrality. It is an issue that people either feel at a core level to support or they don’t.  The Committee voted to send the bill to the next committee Appropriations.  That motion failed 8-5.  There was a motion to Postpone the bill indefinitely, (passing 9-4) killing the bill for the remainder of the session.

Many Bar sections weighed in on the bill, its technical merits, and the drafting problems of the bill.  While individual sections had vigorous debates on the policy of “death with dignity” or physician assisted suicide, the LPC took no position on the bill itself.

SB 15-077 – Parents’ Bill of Rights
(Senator Neville & Representative Neville)
This Senate Bill sponsored by the father-son legislative team from Jefferson County was heard and passed out of the Senate committee last week.  The bill is set for its key second reading on Wednesday. Senate Bill 77, the so-called “Parents’ Bill of Rights” sponsored by Sen. Tim Neville and Rep. Patrick Neville, would give parents certain rights over the health care, education and mental health care of minor children.  The Bar Association voted to oppose this legislation at its LPC meeting on January 30.

SB 15-049 – Real Estate Title Vests In Entity Once Formed
(Senator Martinez Humenik & Representative Keyser)
This bill – supported by the bar – continues through the legislature on a straightforward course. It has now passed the Senate and will be heard in the Hose Business Affairs and Labor Committee, where Rep. Keyser will be the key sponsor.

HB 15-1121 – Wind Energy Generation
(Representative J. Becker & Senator Sonnenberg)
This Bar supported bill is also progressing through the legislative process.  Representative Becker has successfully completed the House process, and the bill passes to Senator Sonnenberg for the final leg of its legislative journey.

New Bills of Interest

Senate

SB 15-129 – Preserving Parent-child Relationships
(Senator Lundberg)
The bill amends provisions relating to best interests of a child in domestic relations actions and certain other actions in the juvenile code. With respect to such actions, the bill:

Amends the legislative declaration to emphasize the fundamental liberty interest of both parents and children in maintaining the parent-child relationship;

With respect to temporary orders hearings, if there has been a temporary or permanent protection order entered against one or both parties either prior to or in conjunction with the domestic relations action, requires the court to grant an expedited hearing at the request of either party for purposes of modifying provisions in the protection order relating to parenting time, communication, and access to a child. The court shall order substantially equal parenting time and access to the child unless it finds that such orders are clearly not in the child’s best interest. The court shall also enter any orders necessary for the safety of the protected party relating to the restrained party’s parenting time with the child.

Changes the nature of an investigation by a court-appointed child and family investigator (CFI) from evaluation and recommendations to investigation and fact-finding. CFIs will conduct an objective investigation of issues as specifically directed by the court and will provide written factual findings to the court that are supported by credible evidence. A CFI’s report will not make recommendations regarding the allocation of parental responsibilities but will provide the court with the factual findings the court deems necessary to make such determinations.

Amends language in the legislative declaration regarding the allocation of parental rights and responsibilities relating to the best interests of the child. Also, the bill requires the court to allocate substantially equal parenting time unless the court finds that doing so would endanger a child’s physical health or significantly impair the child’s emotional development. In addition, the court shall award mutual decision-making responsibilities with respect to the child unless the court finds that such an order is clearly not in the child’s best interest.

For purposes of temporary orders in a domestic relations action, requires the court to award substantially equal parenting time to the parties unless the court finds that doing so would endanger a child’s physical health or significantly impair the child’s emotional development. In addition, the court shall order mutual decision-making responsibilities unless mutual decision-making is clearly not in the child’s best interest.

Changes the nature of an evaluation by a court-appointed parental responsibilities evaluator to an investigation by a mental health professional. The mental health investigation is limited to mental health diagnoses, assessments of relevant addictions, or other mental health-related issues that are relevant to the court’s allocation of parental responsibilities for the child. The investigator’s report shall contain findings of fact but shall not contain conclusions or recommendations relating to the allocation of parental rights and responsibilities.

Clarifies that the 2-year restriction on filing motions that request a substantial change in parenting time and that also change the party with whom the child resides the majority of the time do not apply to moderate changes to parenting time when the existing parenting time order awarded substantially equal parenting time to the parties; and

Amends the provisions relating to modification of decision-making responsibility for a child from requiring the court to retain the prior decision-maker unless certain criteria are met to permitting the court to change the decision-maker after considering certain criteria, including whether an award of mutual decision-making responsibilities is now in the child’s best interest.

SB 15-174 – Uniform Substitute Decision Making Documents Act
(Senator Steadman)
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill adopts, with amendments, the “Uniform Substitute Decision-making Documents Act” as Colorado law. The bill establishes the circumstances under which a substitute decision-making document (document) executed outside this state is valid in this state. A person may assume in good faith that a document is genuine, valid, and still in effect and that the decision-maker’s authority is genuine, valid, and still in effect. A person who is asked to accept a document shall do so within a reasonable amount of time. The person may not require an additional or different form of document for authority granted in the document presented. A person who refuses to accept a substitute document is subject to:  A court order mandating acceptance of the document; and Liability for reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred in an action or proceeding that mandates acceptance of the document. A person is not required to accept a substitute document under certain described conditions.

House

HB 15-1043 – Felony Offense For Repeat DUI Offenders
(Senators Cooke and Johnson & Representatives McCann and Saine)
Under current law, a DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI is a misdemeanor offense. The bill makes such an offense a class 4 felony if the violation occurred: (1) After 3 or more prior convictions for DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI; vehicular homicide; vehicular assault; or any combination thereof; or (2) not more than 7 years after the first of 2 prior convictions for DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI; vehicular homicide; vehicular assault; or any combination thereof, if the violation included at least one of the following circumstances: One or more persons less than 18 years of age were present in the person’s vehicle at the time of the violation;  In committing the violation, the person caused damage or injury to any property or persons;  After committing the violation, the person fled the scene; or At the time of the violation, or within 2 hours after the violation, the person’s BAC was 0.15 or higher. Under current law, aggravated driving with a revoked license is a class 6 felony. The bill changes the penalty to a class 1 misdemeanor but requires a sentencing court to ensure that an offender spends a minimum of 60 days in the custody of a county jail. Under current law, a person whose privilege to drive was revoked for multiple convictions for any combination of a DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI must hold an interlock-restricted license for at least one year following reinstatement prior to being eligible to obtain any other driver’s license. The bill expands this period to a minimum of 2 years and a maximum of 5 years. The bill repeals provisions relating to the crime of aggravated driving with a revoked license when the offender also commits DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI as part of the same criminal episode. The bill makes conforming amendments.

HB 15-1161 – Public Accommodation First Amendment Rights
(Representative Klingenschmitt)
The bill specifies that neither the civil rights division, the civil rights commission, nor a court with jurisdiction to hear civil actions brought under the public accommodations laws may compel involuntary speech or acts of involuntary artistic expression or involuntary religious expression by a person when such speech or acts of artistic or religious expression would lead to that person directly or indirectly participating in, directly or indirectly supporting, or endorsing or impliedly endorsing an ideology, ceremony, creed, behavior, or practice with which the person does not agree.

HB 15-1189 – Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act
(Representative Keyser & Senator Steadman)
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill enacts the “Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act”, as amended, as Colorado law. The bill sets forth the conditions under which certain fiduciaries may access: The content of an electronic communication of a principal or decedent; A catalog of electronic communications sent or received by a decedent or principal; and  Any other digital asset in which a principal has a right or interest or in which a decedent had a right or interest at death. As to tangible personal property capable of receiving, storing, processing, or sending a digital asset, a fiduciary with authority over the property of a decedent, protected person, principal, or settlor may access the property and any digital asset stored in it and is an authorized user for purposes of computer fraud and unauthorized computer access laws.

“Fiduciary” means a personal representative, a conservator, an agent, or a trustee. A custodian and its officers, employees, and agents are immune from liability for an act or omission done in good-faith compliance with the provisions of the bill.

HB 15-1203 – Concerning earned time for certain offenders serving life sentences as habitual offenders
(Representative Rosenthal & Senator Steadman)
Under current law, an offender who was sentenced to a habitual offender 40-calendar-year life sentence before July 1, 1993, is not accruing earned time. The bill permits those sentenced under those circumstances to accrue earned time.

HB 15-1212 – Authority To Sell State Trust Lands To Local Gov
(Representative KC Becker & Senator Kerr)
In 2010, a law was enacted that allowed the state board of land commissioners (board) to convey land to units of local government if the conveyance would add value to adjoining or nearby state trust property, benefit board operations, or comply with local land use regulations. When enacted, the authority was set to repeal on July 1, 2015. The bill repeals that automatic repeal and makes the board’s authority permanent.

 

*a “Strike Below” amendment essentially replaces the entire bill below the title with an entirely different bill.  In practice this changes almost everything about the bill – but addresses the same topic, allowing for the sponsor to retain his/her bill and to continue working on the topic.  It is generally used when interested parties and stakeholders need a complete rewrite of the bill as originally introduced in ordrr to try and reach consensus.

 

e-Legislative Report: May 12, 2014

Special Issue: End of the 2014 Legislative Session

Just a quick note to readers that the 2nd Regular Session of the 69th General Assembly came to a close on Wednesday, May 7. Please look for “Legislative Highlights” in the July issue of The Colorado Lawyer. In addition, The Colorado Lawyer August issue will contain the “2014 Legislative Update.”

My thanks to all who subscribe to the e-legislative newsletter. We hope that the updates have been useful to you throughout the 2014 legislative session.

Thankfully, for the CBA the year was quite successful. Our sponsored legislation has been approved by the legislature and is either on its way to the governor or has already been signed by him. The CBA continues its reputation for bringing well thought-out legislation that seeks to improve the legal system—for our members as well as the public.

The Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) and in particular the committee chairman and CBA President Terry Ruckriegle, must be commended for their efforts throughout the session; they meet weekly when the legislature is in session to direct our efforts at the legislature. During the “off-session” the LPC meets monthly to reflect on the session just concluded and to prepare for the session that is always around the corner.

A big thank you goes out to all the sections for their work in reviewing, amending, fixing, analyzing, killing, and helping pass numerous bills from January through May.

Our contract lobbyist, Amy Redfern and our lobby firm of Aponté–Busam, do a phenomenal job of representing the CBA at the legislature. Amy’s intellect, experience, and professionalism are tremendous assets to our Association.

A very special note of thanks to my colleague Margaret Haywood, Web & Communications Specialist at the Colorado Bar Association, for her efforts to not only get the e-legislative newsletter published each week, but for her help in making the format attractive to readers.

One last item, if something big should arise over the summer I reserve the right to bring it to your attention through this newsletter.

Have a good summer!

e-Legislative Report: April 7, 2014

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

The LPC did not meet on Friday, April 4.

At the Capitol—Week of March 31

A scorecard of the committee and floor work follows.

In the House

Monday, March 31

No bills were heard on 3rd reading.

Tuesday, April 1

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1315. Concerning the enactment of certain model acts adopted by the national association of insurance commissioners, and, in connection therewith, enacting the credit for reinsurance model act and the portion of the insurer receivership model act that governs netting agreements. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1313. Concerning a requirement that the owner of a pet animal provide a valid rabies vaccination certificate prior to registering the animal with a county. Vote: 40 yes and 25 no.
  • HB 14-1045. Concerning the continuation of the breast and cervical cancer prevention and treatment program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 50 yes and 15 no.
  • HB 14-1281. Concerning the allowance for terminally ill patients to have access to investigational products that have not been approved by the federal food and drug administration that other patients have access to when they participate in clinical trials. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1302. Concerning the addition of a judgment against a debtor or transferee who acts with actual intent as an available remedy for a creditor in a fraudulent transfer action. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.

Wednesday, April 2

No bills were heard on 3rd reading.

Thursday, April 3

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-135. Concerning the repeal of certain provisions concerning the purchasing of firearms in states that are contiguous to Colorado. Vote: 61 yes, 1 no, and 3 excused.

Friday, April 4

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-103. Concerning the phase-out of the sale of certain low efficiency plumbing fixtures. Vote: 35 yes, 28 no, and 2 excused.
  • HB 14-1001. Concerning the creation of a property tax reimbursement for a taxpayer that owes property tax on property that has been destroyed by a natural cause, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing appropriations. Vote: 46 yes, 17 no, and 2 excused.

In the Senate

Monday, March 31

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1195. Concerning the diversion of revenue collected by the division of insurance to cash funds. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.

Tuesday, April 1

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-163. Concerning clarifying changes to provisions related to the sentencing of persons convicted of drug crimes. Vote: 33 yes, 0 no, and 2 excused.
  • SB 14-160. Concerning removing limitations on a transitional living program for a person with a brain injury. Vote: 33 yes, 0 no, and 2 excused.
  • HB 14-1141. Concerning the confidentiality of social security numbers under statutes protecting the privacy of individuals. Vote: 33 yes, 0 no, and 2 excused.

Wednesday, April 2

No bills were heard on 3rd Reading.

Thursday, April 3

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • The Senate spent numerous hours debating various 2nd Reading amendments to HB 14-1336. Concerning the provision for payment of the expenses of the executive, legislative, and judicial departments of the state of Colorado, and of its agencies and institutions, for and during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014, except as otherwise noted—“the Budget bill.”

Friday, April 4

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1282. Concerning the specification of what materials may be provided in a language other than English by an insurer to a customer. Vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1336. Concerning the provision for payment of the expenses of the executive, legislative, and judicial departments of the state of Colorado, and of its agencies and institutions, for and during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014, except as otherwise noted—“the Budget bill.” Vote: 26 yes, 8 no, and 1 excused.

Stay tuned for 10 Bills of Interest.

 

e-Legislative Report: March 3, 2014

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

Action taken at Feb. 28 LPC meeting:

  • The Committee voted to include a provision to the upcoming CBA Trusts and Estates Probate Code Omnibus legislation that is coming to a legislature near year you. The amendment provides a method for dealing with personal property that is secured by real property. This language will fit in with the small estate affidavit procedural changes previously approved by the LPC. The changes are CBA sponsored.
  • The Committee voted to support Parts 4 & 6 of the Uniform Power of Appointment Act (“UPOAA”) as prepared by the Trusts and Estates Committee who has previously navigated Parts 1–3 through the CBA approval process. The CBA will inform the Colorado Uniform Law Commissioners of the latest development and assist in obtaining a late bill. The UPOAA is CBA supported legislation.

At the Capitol—Week of Feb. 24

A scorecard of the committee and floor work follows.

In the House

Monday, Feb. 24

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-52. Concerning actions taken to remediate soil erosion creating property damage. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1152. Concerning passive surveillance records of governmental entities. Vote: 63 yes and 2 no.
  • SB 14-67. Concerning aligning certain state medical assistance programs’ eligibility laws with the federal “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.” Vote: 37 yes and 28 no.
  • HB 14-1184. Concerning conservancy districts that are organized for the purpose of preventing floods. Vote: 65 yes and 0 no.
  • HB 14-1193. Concerning requirements governing the imposition of a fee for the research and retrieval of public records under the “Colorado Open Records Act.” Vote: 41 yes and 24 no.
  • HB 14-1265. Concerning the regulation of games of chance. Vote: 63 yes and 2 no.
  • HB 14-1222. Concerning modification of the terms under which a county may issue tax-exempt private activity bonds on behalf of an eligible applicant for the purpose of financing a geothermal energy project on the applicant’s property. Vote: 39 yes and 36 no.
  • HB 14-1228. Concerning the repeal of certain requirements for defensive driving schools attended in accordance with a court order resulting from a violation of a law regulating the operation of a motor vehicle. Vote: 63 yes and 2 no.

Tuesday, Feb. 25

Passed 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1114. Concerning the administration of earned time by the state department of corrections. Vote: 57 yes, 6 no, and 2 excused.
  • HB 14-1142. Concerning a prohibition against the off-site electronic sale of lottery tickets by the Colorado lottery commission. Vote: 49 yes, 14 no, and 2 excused.
  • HB 14-1163. Concerning a clarification of the cap imposed on the enterprise zone investment tax credit. Vote: 37 yes, 26 no, and 2 excused.
  • HB 14-1028. Concerning a limitation on the United States’ ability to impose conditions on a water right owner in exchange for permission to use land. Vote: 39 yes, 24 no, and 2 excused.

Wednesday, Feb. 26

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1034. Concerning the creation of a wine packaging permit to allow certain alcohol beverage licensees to package wine produced by another wine manufacturer, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 61 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1082. Concerning a requirement for written notice of cancellation of individual life insurance policies, and in connection therewith, requiring written notice prior to the lapse of individual life insurance policies. Vote: 61 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1254. Concerning a requirement to disclose fees charged to a unit owners’ association by a community association manager. Vote: 53 yes, 8 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1191. Concerning the creation of an emergency alert program to notify the public after a serious hit-and-run accident. Vote: 61 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1210. Concerning a requirement that a state agency enter into an intergovernmental agreement with a county to address wildland fires affecting certain state lands located within the county. Vote: 61 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1188. Concerning revenue generated from the outdoor advertising program administered by the department of transportation. Vote: 61 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.

Thursday, Feb. 27

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1054. Concerning restricting access by minors to artificial tanning devices, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 33 yes, 31 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1108. Concerning limits on copayments made by a covered person for physical rehabilitation services. Vote: 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.

Friday, Feb. 28

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1100. Concerning the use of title documents to give notice of characteristics of motor vehicles that affect a vehicle’s value, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 59 yes, 3 no, and 3 excused.
  • SB 14-76. Concerning the creation of a hard rock mining permit issued by the division of reclamation, mining, and safety for mining operations disturbing no more than five acres of surface area. Vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.

In the Senate

Monday, Feb. 24

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • Consent Calendar: Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
    1. HB 14-1074. Concerning payments that a nonprofit owner of a tax-exempt property may receive for reasonable expenses incurred without affecting the tax-exempt status of the property.
    2. HB 14-1018. Concerning the requirement that the department of revenue prepare a tax profile and expenditure report every two years.
    3. HB 14-1056. Concerning clarification of the statutes relating to the registration of collector’s item motor vehicles to specify that certain special emission inspection requirements for collector’s item motor vehicles registered prior to the enactment of House Bill 13-1071 continue to apply to those vehicles until they are transferred.
    4. HB 14-1010. Concerning corrections to statutory provisions relating to the prescribed burning program administered by the division of fire prevention and control in the department of public safety.
  • SB 14-17. Concerning a limitation on the approval of real estate developments that use water rights decreed for agricultural purposes to irrigate lawn grass. Vote: 24 yes and 11 no.
  • SB 14-18. Concerning the prohibition against furnishing nicotine products to persons under eighteen years of age. Vote: 25 yes and 10 no.

Tuesday, Feb. 25

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • Consent Calendar: Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
    1. HB 14-1059, by Representative(s) Garcia; also Senator(s) Crowder—Concerning clarifying that the ritual discharge of blank ammunition cartridges at a military funeral does not constitute the criminal offense of disorderly conduct.
    2. HB 14-1079. Concerning an increase in the monetary amount allowed for the limited offering registration procedure under the “Colorado Securities Act.”
  • HB 14-1024. Concerning the designation of the claret cup cactus as the state cactus. Vote: 28 yes and 7 no.

Wednesday, Feb. 26

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • Consent Calendar:
    1. SB 14-142. Concerning an exception for certain water system facilities from the facilities that the commissioner of agriculture has a duty to inspect regarding pesticide storage. Vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
    2. HB 14-1050. Concerning an increase in the number of judges for the eighteenth judicial district, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 33 yes, 1 no, and 1 excused.
    3. SB 14-49. Concerning endangering public utility transmission, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. Vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1005. Concerning clarification of the requirements applicable to a change of point of water diversion. Vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-129. Concerning changes to criminal provisions related to marijuana. Vote: 32 yes, 2 no, and 1 excused.

Thursday, Feb. 27

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-93. Concerning equivalent authority for pipeline companies to acquire right-of-way. Vote: 24 yes, 10 no, and 1 excused.

Friday, Feb. 21

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1022. Concerning alignment of the duration of the child care authorization notice with the child care assistance eligibility period for children participating in the Colorado child care assistance program. Vote: 33 yes, 0 no, and 2 excused.
  • SB 14-29. Concerning the establishment of a paint stewardship program for the environmentally sound disposal of postconsumer architectural paint. Vote: 18 yes, 15 no, and 2 excused.

Stay tuned for 10 Bills of Interest.

e-Legislative Report: February 10, 2014

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

At the meeting on Friday, Feb. 7, the CBA LPC:

  • Voted to oppose HB 14-1153. Concerning attorney fees when an action is dismissed prior to trial.

At the Capitol—Week of Feb. 3

A scorecard of the committee and floor work follows.

In the House

Monday, Feb. 3

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1026. Concerning the authorization of flexible water markets. Vote: 47 yes, 13 no, and 5 excused.

Tuesday, Feb. 4

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1047. Concerning restrictions on the publishing of basic identification information on commercial web sites. Vote: 45 yes, 19 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1079. Concerning an increase in the monetary amount allowed for the limited offering registration procedure under the “Colorado Securities Act.” Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1069. Concerning district commissions on judicial performance. Vote: 62 yes, 2 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1051. Concerning a strategic plan for enrolling all eligible persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities into programs at the time services and supports are needed, and, in connection therewith, requiring the department of health care policy and financing to develop and implement the strategic plan and to report annually on the number of persons waiting for services and supports. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1010. Concerning corrections to statutory provisions relating to the prescribed burning program administered by the division of fire prevention and control in the department of public safety. Vote: 64 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.

Thursday, Feb. 6

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1052. Concerning an increase in the enforcement authority of ground water management districts. Vote: 38 yes, 24 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1146. Concerning a prohibition against greyhound racing in Colorado. Vote: 39 yes, 23 no, and 1 excused.

In the Senate

Monday, Feb. 3

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-84. Concerning the election of a county commissioner in a county with a population of less than seventy thousand by the voters residing in the district from which the commissioner runs for election. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.
  • SB 14-59. Concerning eliminating the statute of limitations for offenses that accompany sex offenses that are not subject to a statute of limitations. Vote: 30 yes and 5 no.
  • HB 14-1019. Concerning the enactment of Colorado Revised Statutes 2013 as the positive and statutory law of the state of Colorado. Vote: 21 yes and 14 no.
  • SB 14-80. Concerning the elimination of the list of certain additional qualifications that apply to property valuation appeal arbitrators. Vote: 35 yes and 0 no.

Tuesday, Feb. 4

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-63. Concerning the mandatory review of existing executive branch agency rules conducted by each principal department. Vote 33 yes and 2 absent.

Stay tuned for 10 bills of interest.

e-Legislative Report: February 3, 2014

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

At the meeting on Friday, Jan. 31, the CBA LPC voted on several bills:

  • The Committee voted to support HB 14-1069. Concerning district commissions on judicial performance.
  • The Committee voted to oppose HB 14-1110. Concerning procedures governing discussions by boards of education of school districts while meeting in executive session.
  • The Committee voted to take no position on two bills: HB 14-1041. Concealed Handgun Carry without a Permit, and HB 14-38. Governor cannot restrict firearms during emergency.

At the Capitol—Week of Jan. 27

In the House

Monday, Jan. 27

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1020. Concerning the consolidation of two reports on taxable property that county assessors submit to their boards of equalization. The vote: 65 yes, 0 no.
  • HB 14-1020. Concerning the consolidation of two reports on taxable property that county assessors submit to their boards of equalization. The vote: 65 yes, 0 no.
  • HB 14-1059. Concerning clarifying that the ritual discharge of blank ammunition cartridges at a military funeral does not constitute the criminal offense of disorderly conduct. The vote: 65 yes, 0 no.

Wednesday, Jan. 29

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1050. Concerning an increase in the number of judges for the Eighteenth Judicial District, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. The vote: 58 yes, 4 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1035. Concerning collection of restitution ordered pursuant to a deferred judgment. The vote: 62 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • HB 14-1086. Concerning a requirement that a legal notice published in a newspaper is also published on a statewide web site maintained by a majority of Colorado newspapers. The vote: 55 yes, 7 no, and 3 excused.

Thursday, Jan. 30

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • HB 14-1005. Concerning clarification of the requirements applicable to a change of point of water diversion. The vote: 61 yes, 2 no and 1 excused.
  • HB 14-1164. Concerning nonpartisan elections not coordinated by a county clerk and recorder, and, in connection therewith, creating the “Colorado Local Government Election Code” for the conduct of such elections by special districts, harmonizing residency requirements for voter registration, modifying the “Colorado Municipal Election Code of 1965,” and clarifying when elections are coordinated by county clerk and recorders. The vote 37 yes, 25 no, and 2 excused.

In the Senate

Tuesday, Jan. 28

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-007. Concerning authority for a board of county commissioners to transfer county general fund moneys to its county road and bridge fund after a declared disaster emergency in the county. The vote: 35 yes, 0 no.

Wednesday, Jan. 29

Passed on 3rd Reading:

  • SB 14-048. Concerning use of the most recent United States census bureau mortality table as evidence of the expectancy of continued life of any person in a civil action in Colorado. The vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-076. Concerning the creation of a hard rock mining permit issued by the division of reclamation, mining, and safety for mining operations disturbing no more than five acres of surface area. The vote: 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-067. Concerning aligning certain state medical assistance programs’ eligibility laws with the federal “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”. The vote: 20 yes, 14 no, and 1 excused.
  • SB 14-052. Concerning actions taken to remediate soil erosion creating property damage. The vote: 30 yes, 4 no, and 1 excused.

e-Legislative Report: 5/13/13

Michael Valdez, Director of Legislative Relations for the CBA, issued his final e-Legislative Report of the 2013 Legislative Session on Monday, May 13, 2013. In this issue, he discusses the end of the session at the Capitol and gives a quick glance ahead.

At the Capitol – End of Session

The Legislature has adjourned sine die for the First Regular Session of the Sixty-ninth General Assembly. The final gavels (House and Senate) came down on Wednesday, May 8 in the late afternoon. We will provide recaps of the session in upcoming issues of The Colorado Lawyer.

My thanks to all who subscribe to the eLegislative Report. We hope the updates were useful to you throughout the 2013 legislative session.

The CBA had a good year under the dome. Our sponsored legislation has been approved by the legislature and is either already signed by or on its way to Gov. John Hickenlooper. The CBA continues its reputation for bringing well thought-out legislation that seeks to improve the legal system—for our members as well as the public.

A big thank you goes out to all the sections for their work in reviewing, amending, fixing, analyzing, killing, and helping pass numerous bills from January through May.

The Legislative Policy Committee (LPC), and in particular Committee Chairman and CBA President Mark Fogg, are to be commended for their efforts throughout the session; they meet weekly when the legislature is in session to direct our efforts at the legislature. During the “off-session” the LPC meets to reflect on the past session and prepare for the session that is always around the corner.

Finally, our contract lobbyist, Amy Redfern and our lobbying firm of Aponté-Busam, do a phenomenal job of representing the CBA at the legislature. Amy’s intellect, experience, and professionalism are tremendous assets to our Association.

A very special note of thanks to my colleague Margaret Haywood, web communications specialist at the Colorado Bar Association, for her efforts to not only get the eLegislative newsletter published each week, but for her help in making the format attractive to readers.

Well done.

Upcoming

Look for the The Colorado Lawyer in July for a quick recap of the session and important legislation; the full Legislative Update will be published in the August issue.

One last item, if something big should arise over the summer I reserve the right to bring it to your attention through this newsletter.

Have a good summer!

Regards,

Michael

e-Legislative Report, 5/6/13

CBA Director of Legislative Relations Michael Valdez issued his weekly e-Legislative Report on May 6, 2013. In this edition, he gives a day-by-day report of what happened at the legislature during the week of April 29. He also summarizes a few more late bills of interest, and notes that the CBA Legislative Policy Committee did not meet on May 3.

At the Capitol

Boxscores

Monday, April 29

  • The House adopted the conference committee report for HB 13-1058. Concerning guidelines for the determination of spousal maintenance (advisory guideline formula to determine spousal maintenance). The adoption of the conference committee report signals the end of the legislative journey for the bill; the bill now heads to Gov. John Hickenlooper for action. The final Senate version of the bill is what the Governor will see when the bill gets to his desk.
  • The House adopted the conference committee report for HB 13-1204. Concerning the “Uniform Premarital and Marital Agreements Act.” The conference committee report made a conforming amendment to the act to address changes made in SB 13-11. Civil Unions.
  • The House adopted the conference committee report for HB 13-1200. Concerning the “Uniform Deployed Parents Custody and Visitation Act.” The conference committee report adopted several important amendments suggested by the Family Law Section.
  • The House adopted HB 13-1317. Concerning the recommendations made in the public process for the purpose of implementing retail marijuana legalized by section 16 of article XVIII of the Colorado constitution, and in connection therewith, making an appropriation on 3rd Reading by a vote of 35 yes, 29, no, and 1 excused.
  • The Senate approved 13-1246. Concerning modifications in connection with current property tax exemptions for nonprofit organizations on 3rd and final reading by a vote of 35–0.
  • The Senate approved 13-255. Concerning child fatality review teams, and, in connection therewith, increasing the capacity and resources, clarifying the responsibilities and processes of state and local child fatality review teams in the departments of public health and environment and human services, and making an appropriation on a 22–13 vote.

Tuesday, April 30

  • The Senate adopted HB 1163. Concerning payment for medical costs associated with obtaining a medical forensic examination for victims of sexual offenses, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on 3rd Reading on a 35–0 vote.
  • The Senate approved HB 12-1276. Concerning limitations on the actions a unit owners’ association under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act” may take against a unit owner with respect to the collection of debt owed to the unit owners’ association by a 35–0 vote.
  • The Senate passed 13-1142. Concerning reforms to the “Urban and Rural Enterprise Zone Act,” and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote of 21–14.
  • The Senate adopted HB 13-1156. Concerning creation of an adult diversion program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a 35–0 vote.
  • The Senate gave final approval to HB 13-1138. Concerning benefit corporations, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a party line vote 20–15. The bill was sent back to the House for consideration of the Senate amendments.
  • The Senate adopted HB 13-1134. Concerning unit owners’ associations under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act” on a party line vote of 20–15.
  • The Senate unanimously approved SB 13-271. Concerning funding for the address confidentiality program on 3rd and final reading.
  • With a smidgen of bipartisan support, the Senate gave final approval of HB 13-1266. Concerning the alignment of state health insurance laws with the requirements of the federal “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” on a vote of 21–14.
  • The Senate adopted on 3rd and final Reading HB 13-1082. Concerning juvenile delinquency records on a 35–0 vote.
  • The House gave final approval of SB 13-252. Concerning measures to increase Colorado’s renewable energy standard so as to encourage the deployment of methane capture technologies on a vote of 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House adopted HB 13-1318. Concerning the recommendations made in the public process for the purpose of implementing certain state taxes on retail marijuana legalized by section 16 of article XVIII of the Colorado constitution, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote of 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House approved HB 13-1306. Concerning creating a task force to consider persons who pose a threat of harm to themselves or others on 3rd and final reading; the vote: 35 yes, 29 no, and 1 excused.

Wednesday, May 1

  • The House adopted—34 yes, 28 no, and one excused—HB 13-1316. Concerning the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission’s adoption of uniform statewide groundwater sampling rules, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
  • The House approved SB 13-47. Concerning protections for youth in foster care against identity theft, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote of 63 yes, 1 no, and one excused.
  • The House approved 13-246. Concerning creation of a task force to study discovery costs in criminal case by a vote of 64 yes, 1 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House adopted HB 13-111. Concerning abuse of at-risk adults, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation by a vote of 56 yes, 8 no, and 1 absent.
  • The House voted to concur with the amendments added by the Senate to HB 13-1138. Concerning benefit corporations, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. The Senate amendments to the bill represent a significant compromise on the bill. The motion to concur with Senate amendments was passed on a vote of 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House voted to concur with the amendments added by the Senate to HB 13-1276. Concerning limitations on the actions a unit owners’ association under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act” may take against a unit owner with respect to the collection of debt owed to the unit owners’ association; the vote: 47 yes, 17 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House voted to concur with the amendments added by the Senate to HB 13-1156. Concerning creation of an adult diversion program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote of 61 yes, 3 no, and 1 excused.
  • The Senate gave its final approval to 13-250. Concerning changes to sentencing of persons convicted of drug crimes, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. The final vote was 34–1.
  • The Senate gave final approval to SB 13-244. Concerning a task force to study substance abuse. The final vote was 34–1.

Thursday, May 2

  • The Senate adopted HB 13-1230. Concerning compensation for persons who are exonerated of their crimes after a period of incarceration, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote 32 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • The Senate gave final approval to HB 13-1240. Concerning penalties for persistent drunk drivers, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote 32 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • Adopted on a vote of 33 yes, 1, no, and 1 excused, the Senate gave final support for HB 13-1160. Concerning criminal theft, and, in connection therewith, reducing an appropriation.
  • The Senate gave final approval of SB 13-283. Concerning implementation of amendment 64, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing an appropriation. The vote was 32 yes, 2, no, and 1 excused.
  • The Senate voted to concur with the House amendments to SB 13-111. Concerning abuse of at-risk adults, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation (Mandatory reporting of elder abuse). The vote to concur was 24 yes, 10 no, and 1 excused.
  • The Senate voted to concur with the House amendments to SB 13-147. Concerning protections for youth in foster care against identity theft, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. The vote to concur was 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.

Friday, May 3

  • The House gave final approval to SB 13-262. Concerning the exemption of representative services of enrolled agents from the definition of debt management services. The vote was unanimous—65-0.
  • On 3rd and final reading, the House adopted HB 13-1323. Concerning requiring the department of corrections to obtain clarification if a court-issued mittimus omits instruction concerning whether a defendant’s sentences are to be served consecutively or concurrently on a vote of 65–0.
  • The Senate gave final approval to HB 13-1284, Concerning documents that can be filed regarding security interests under the “Uniform Commercial Code.”

The full e-Legislative Report, including summaries of late bills of interest, can be found here.

e-Legislative Report, 4/8/13

CBA Director of Legislative Relations Michael Valdez issued his weekly e-Legislative Report on April 8, 2013. In this issue, he discusses the actions of the CBA Legislative Policy Committee, some important bills at the Capitol, and 20 bills of interest (10 from each house).

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

The Legislative Policy Committee voted to support the Juvenile Law Section’s proposed amendments to SB 13-227. Concerning methods to protect the victim of a sexual assault in cases where a child was conceived as a result of the sexual assault.

The LPC also voted to support a House Joint Resolution, HJR 13-1019, concerning creation of an interim committee to study legal defense in juvenile justice proceedings, as recommended by the Juvenile Law Section.

At the Capitol

  • The Long Bill
  • The Long Bill continues its run as the biggest show in town. The House took its turn at amending and improving the bill last week. The Long bill a/k/a the Budget Bill, SB. 13-230 began the heavy part of its run in the House on Wednesday and finished up on Friday, April 5. At times, the floor debate became testy on 2nd and 3rd Reading in the House.
  • The budget fun should conclude by the end of the week; in the meantime we will get back to business as usual … bills, bills, bills.

For the complete e-Legislative Report, including the 20 bills of interest, click here.

e-Legislative Report, 4/1/13

CBA Director of Legislative Relations Michael Valdez prepared this week’s e-Legislative Report. He discusses the activities of the Legislative Policy Committee and important bills at the capitol, and provides summaries of 20 bills of interest (15 from the House and 5 from the Senate).

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

On Friday, March 29, the LPC voted to support the Family Law Section’s proposed amendments to HB 13-1259. Concerning civil actions, and, in connection therewith, procedures for allocating parental rights and responsibilities in the best interests of the child in cases involving child abuse and neglect and domestic violence; provisions relating to parenting time orders; provisions relating to parenting time evaluations and reports; and amending and relocating provisions relating to civil protection orders.

At the Capitol

  • The Long Bill—Center Stage or Center Ring?
  • Starting on Monday, March 25, the Senate tackled the Long Bill, a/k/a the Budget Bill, SB. 13-230. After a series of round robin presentations to committees of reference by the Joint Budget Committee, the Republicans and Democrats broke for caucus meetings to discuss and propose amendments to the long bill. On Wednesday, March 27, the Senate debated the budget bill on 2nd Reading. On Thursday, March 28, the Senate gave final approval on and passed the bill to the House.
  • Both chambers took the day off on Friday, March 29.
  • The Budget Bill will travel a similar route in the House when the legislature returns from the extended weekend.
  • Update: Death Penalty—Two Bills, Similar Fate
  • On Tuesday, March 26, the House Judiciary defeated the proposal to repeal the death penalty in Colorado. HB 13-1264. Repeal of the Death Penalty was failed on a vote of 4–6 with one excused.
  • On Wednesday, March 27, the Local Government Committee voted to postpone indefinitely the proposal to refer the state’s policy regarding the death penalty to the voters. The final vote, 13–0 to defeat the bill ends the journey for HB 1270. Refer Repeal Of Death Penalty To Citizen Vote.

For the complete e-Legislative Report, including summaries of 20 Bills of Interest, click here.

e-Legislative Report: March 11, 2013

Michael Valdez, the Director of Legislative Relations for the Colorado Bar Association, discusses notable bills at the Capitol in this week’s edition of the e-Legislative Report. The Legislative Policy Committee did not meet on March 8, so there is no update from LPC.

At the Capitol

  • HB 13-1138. Concerning Benefit Corporations. By Rep. Lee and Sen. Kefalas. On Friday, March 9, the House Appropriations moved the bill to the full House for consideration on 2nd Reading. The bill will be on the calendar for 2nd Reading sometime during the week of March 11.
  • On March 8, Governor Hickenlooper signed into law, HB 13-1035. Concerning an increase in the number of judges in certain judicial districts, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. The bill creates two new district court judgeships; one each in the 5th and 9th Judicial Districts. Although the bill was signed on March 8, the act doesn’t take effect until July 1.
  • Almost 10 years in the making, SB 13-33. Concerning in-state classification at institutions of higher education for students who complete high school in Colorado was given final approval by the House of Representatives on Friday, March 8. The bill requires an institution of higher education in Colorado to classify a student as an in-state student for tuition purposes if the student: 1) attends a public or private high school in Colorado for least 3 years immediately preceding graduation or completion of a general equivalency diploma (GED) in Colorado; and 2) is admitted to a Colorado institution or attends an institution under a reciprocity agreement
  • Civil Unions watch: SB 13-11. Concerning authorization of civil unions, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. By Sen. Steadman and Rep. Ferrandino. On March 6, the Finance Committee approved the bill and referred it to the Appropriations Committee. On March 8, the Appropriations Committee adopted the bill and sent it to the full House for consideration on 2nd Reading. Why all the attention to SB 11? Once approved, the vast majority of the bill goes into effect on May 1. View the current bill version online.

Also available in the e-Legislative Report are summaries of 20 bills of interest — 10 from each house. Click here for the full list of bill summaries, or stay tuned to CBA-CLE Legal Connection.