April 21, 2019

Resolve Client Conflicts Through Narrative Mediation

ADR2015Editor’s Note: This article is excerpted from materials written by C. Adam Foster of Hoban & Feola, LLC, who will present “Once Upon a Mediation: The Role of Narrative in Alternative Dispute Resolution” at CLE’s 9th Annual Colorado ADR Conference on October 7, 2015. See below for registration information.

Each person tells themselves a story about how their past experiences have shaped them as a person and how these experiences, along with their goals and values, define what is important to them in life. In other words, personal narrative gives meaning to past experiences, which define the individual’s self-image in the present and in turn circumscribes how they view their relationships with others and how they evaluate their choices moving forward. Individuals create multiple narratives in different contexts that inform how they see themselves in various social roles, for instance as professionals, spouses, parents and friends. These individual narratives stand in dialog with larger social narratives involving class, race, gender, sexual orientation, religion and many other aspects of identity. Moreover, the existence of these narratives and their effect on the construction of identity may be more or less consciously acknowledged depending on the individual and their circumstances at any given time. Regardless of whether consciously or (more often) subconsciously, each individual crafts a narrative that reaffirms his or her values and identity. Thus, “[t]he stories that one constructs fit into a wider web of stories relating to other stories created by the same individual, to stories created by members of one’s social network, and even to cultural stories on a societal level” (Hansen, 2003). The notion of interrelated individual narrative and larger scale social discourse has been adopted into the practice of Narrative Mediation. Kure & Winslade (2010) elaborate:

In particular, narrative mediators focus on what can be coined “relational discourses,” which are local systems of meaning that shape the identities of parties in a relationship. These relational discourses map on to larger, more pervasive, discourses, or orders of discourse, but at the personal level, they are manifest through the ‘positioning ’of each of the parties in a power relation.

This idea of individual identity as a product of multiple individual and group discourses and narratives dovetails with the concept of “discursive positioning.” As Winslade (2003) writes: “As people speak, they position themselves not just in immediate relation to other person(s) in the conversation, but also in relation to utterances in other conversations.” Furthermore, discursive positioning occurs not just in relation to past conversations that the parties have had with each other, but innumerable conversations they have had with third parties.

The statement of facts is the most important portion of any legal brief because citation to legal authorities is meaningless unless the decision maker understands the specific factual context of the case. Judges, juries and arbitrators want to achieve a fair outcome. A properly crafted narrative creates moral tension, suggests a proper result and makes the decision maker care about the outcome. Moreover, a great deal of trial strategy focuses on advancing the client’s narrative and suppressing or disrupting the opposing party’s narrative. A compelling narrative has “integrity” in the sense that the facts fit together in a logical fashion and support the party’s message.

Attorneys must recognize that the audience is different in a bench trial, jury trial, arbitration or mediation—and attorneys should tailor this narrative to the appropriate audience while telling the story the client needs to tell. Moreover, each individual—the parties but also the attorneys and mediator, arbitrator, judge, jury, etc.—is trying to make sense of two related, but distinct, narratives: (i) a narrative regarding the facts of case and a desirable outcome; and (ii) a meta-narrative regarding who they are as a person and how case fits in with their life story.

In mediation making sure that the parties feel heard is critical. Parties want to achieve a favorable outcome but also to feel heard and validated in the process, so a good settlement accomplishes both. A party who achieves favorable financial outcome but doesn’t feel heard feels dissatisfied and may try to undermine the settlement when the opportunity arises.

Common sense dictates that it will usually be more important for parties to agree on certain elements of a joint narrative if they will be in a continuing relationship (e.g., in a workplace or parenting time dispute) versus a one-off transaction (e.g., a tort settlement for money damages). But it is often necessary to establish legal and factual stipulations to settle any type of dispute. Litigation will result in a judgment, but may not further agreement on a joint narrative.

C. Adam Foster, Esq., serves as Special Counsel at Hoban and Feola, where his practice focuses on the representation of business owners and mediation of business cases. He received a B.A. in Anthropology in 1998 from the University of Colorado at Boulder and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Adam returned to the University of Colorado at Boulder to attend law school, where he served as the Articles Editor of the University of Colorado Law Review, won the CU-DU Cup Mock Trial Competition, and received the Legal Aid Award for Outstanding Advocate. Adam joined Hoban & Feola in September of 2010 and today focuses on representing small to medium-sized business owners—including entrepreneurs within the burgeoning cannabis and industrial hemp industries—in transactions and litigation. He also mediates cases involving business, partnership and employment disputes. He speaks Spanish fluently and volunteers regularly, providing pro bono legal referrals through the Colorado Lawyers Committee Legal Nights and Project Homeless Connect.

 

CLE Program: 9th Annual Colorado ADR Conference

This CLE presentation will take place Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at the Renaissance Hotel in Denver. Live program only – click here to register or call (303) 860-0608.

Learn to Negotiate Effectively – Gain the Edge!®

Everyone negotiates. If you are a lawyer – regardless of your practice area – your ability to negotiate effectively may be one of the most critical skills you possess.

Like any skill we possess, our negotiation techniques will grow and develop as we feed them. Our upcoming Gain the Edge!® Negotiation Strategies for Lawyers seminar with Marty Latz will help lawyers hone their skills and become more effective negotiators. The video clip above shows you just one of Marty’s tips for handling negotiations successfully.

As Marty explained to us “There’s basically a right way to negotiate, and there’s a wrong way to negotiate.” While most of us tend to wing it while negotiating, Marty will share decades of proven expert research to help you sharpen your negotiating skills by navigating away from an instinctive or intuitive mindset towards a more strategic method.

This program has something for everyone. “Everybody benefits. Negotiation is truly a life skill,” as Marty says. Whether you are a litigator, family lawyer, or real estate practitioner, negotiations come into your practice. Perhaps you are trying to close a business deal, encountering discovery disputes, trying to solve a taxation issue, or negotiating your office lease. Whatever it is that you do, this program will provide you tips for negotiating in any professional legal environment. By attending, you’ll gain tools to negotiate more successfully with all of the people you encounter: your bosses, co-workers, employees, clients, and other lawyers.

We hope you’ll join us and Marty for Gain the Edge! ® Negotiation Strategies for Lawyers. You can learn more about the topics Marty will cover by viewing the program brochure. As a bonus, each attendee will receive a copy of Marty’s book, Gain the Edge! Negotiating to Get What You Want. To reserve your spot now, click here to register online or call (303) 860-0608.

Then mark your calendar and come prepared to improve your skills and have fun at the same time. Marty’s other seminar attendees have told him that they “not only find [the information] useful, practical, and interesting but they also really enjoy themselves.”

We hope you’ll enjoy it too!

CLE Program: Gain the Edge! ® Negotiation Strategies for Lawyers

This CLE presentation will take place Friday, October 2, 2015 at the CLE offices. All class attendees will receive a copy of Marty Latz’s book, Gain the Edge! Negotiating to Get What You Want. Live program only – click here to register.

Editor’s Note: A version of this post originally appeared on the blog of the Legal Education Society of Alberta on July 28, 2015. Reprinted with permission.