May 20, 2019

Bills Regarding Job Protection, Authorization for Foreign Investments, Electric Vehicle Charging Stations, and More Signed by Governor Hickenlooper

As the 2013 legislative session winds down, bills continue to reach Governor Hickenlooper’s desk for review and signature. Since January 31, 2013, the governor has signed 169 bills.

Governor Hickenlooper signed the “Job Protection and Civil Rights Enforcement Act,” HB 13-1136, on Monday, May 6, 2013. HB 13-1136 – Concerning the Creation of Remedies in Employment Discrimination Cases Brought Under State Law, by Reps. Claire Levy and Joe Salazar and Sens. Morgan Carroll and Lucia Guzman, establishes provisions for complaining parties who have exhausted administrative remedies to bring actions in state court. It also allows claims to be brought by employees of companies with fewer than 15 employees, which are exempt under Federal anti-discrimination provisions.

On May 5, the governor signed one bill, SB 13-176 – Concerning Authorization for the State Treasurer to Invest State Moneys in Debt Obligations Backed By the Full Faith and Credit of the State of Israel. This bill was sponsored by Sens. Mark Scheffel and Morgan Carroll and Reps. Justin Everett and Angela Williams, and it authorizes the state treasurer to invest state moneys in Israeli bonds.

The governor signed 10 bills on Friday, May 3, 2013. Three of the ten bills signed are summarized here.

  • SB 13-126 – Concerning the Removal of Unreasonable Restrictions on the Ability of the Owner of an Electric Vehicle to Access Charging Facilities, by Sen. Lucia Guzman and Rep. Crisanta Duran. The bill requires landlords and common interest communities to allow unit owners to install electric vehicle charging stations on their own property.
  • HB 13-1167 – Concerning the Collection of Business Information by the Secretary of State, by Reps. Brittany Pettersen and Crisanta Duran and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill requires the Secretary of State to request certain demographic information from business owners, which will be available to the public on the Secretary of State website. The demographic information includes gender, race, veteran status, disability status, and NAICS code, and submission of the information is voluntary.
  • HB 13-1222 – Concerning the Expansion of the Group of Family Members for whom Colorado Employees are Entitled to Take Leave from Work under the “Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993″, by Rep. Cherylin Peniston and Sen. Jessie Ulibarri. The bill allows employees to take leave under FMLA to care for their partners in civil unions.

On April 29, 2013, the governor signed six bills. These included the long appropriations bill, three Joint Budget Committee bills regarding the General Fund, and a bill to allow students who complete high school in Colorado to qualify for in-state tuition classification (SB 13-033Concerning In-State Classification at Institutions of Higher Education for Students who Complete High School in Colorado, by Sens. Angela Giron and Mike Johnston and Reps. Crisanta Duran and Angela Williams.) Governor Hickenlooper also signed the budget bill, SB 13-230, on April 29.

On April 26, 2013, Governor Hickenlooper signed 16 bills. Five of these are summarized here.

  • HB 13-1025 Concerning an Increase in the Amount of the Authorized Deductible for Workers’ Compensation Insurance Policies, by Rep. Spencer Swalm and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill increases the allowable deductible for employers’ workers’ compensation insurance policies.
  • HB 13-1123 – Concerning the Right of a Person to Waive Confidentiality Requirements Protecting Personal Work Information Obtained by the Department of Labor and Employment for Unemployment Benefit Claims to Permit the Department to Forward Certain Information to Potential Employers, by Rep. Tony Exum and Sen. Jim Kerr. The bill allows the Department of Labor and Employment to offer job seekers the opportunity to waive confidentiality so that their personal information may be made available to bona fide employers seeking employees.
  • HB 13-1258 – Concerning Local Government Involvement with Federal Immigration Issues, by Rep. Joe Salazar and Sens. Irene Aguilar and Morgan Carroll. The bill repeals C.R.S. Title 29, Article 29, which required local law enforcement officers to report any suspected illegal immigrants to federal immigration officials.
  • SB 13-048 – Concerning the Use of Highway User Tax Fund Moneys Allocated to Local Governments for Multimodal Transportation Infrastructure, by Sen. Nancy Todd and Reps. Max Tyler and Jeanne Labuda. The bill allows counties and municipalities to spend moneys received from the Highway User Tax Fund on transit-related projects.
  • SB 13-070 – Concerning the Purchase of Vehicles that Operate on Alternative Fuels for the State Motor Vehicle Fleet System, by Sen. Gail Schwartz and Reps. Ray Scott and Max Tyler. The bill requires the Department of Personnel and Administration to report on the number of alternative fuel vehicles purchased, the use of alternative fuel, and a plan to develop the infrastructure necessary to utilize more alternative fuel vehicles.

For a complete list of legislation signed into law by the governor in 2013, click here.

SB 13-033: Providing for In-State Tuition Classification at Colorado Institutions of Higher Education for Students Completing High School in Colorado

On Tuesday, January 15, 2013, Sen. Angela Giron introduced SB 13-033 – Concerning In-State Classification at Institutions of Higher Education for Students who Complete High School in Colorado. This summary is published here courtesy of the Colorado Bar Association’s e-Legislative Report.

The bill requires an institution of higher education (institution) in Colorado to classify a student as an in-state student for tuition purposes if the student:

  • Attends a public or private high school in Colorado for at least three years immediately preceding graduation or completion of a general equivalency diploma (GED) in Colorado; and
  • Is admitted to a Colorado institution or attends an institution under a reciprocity agreement.

In addition to the above requirements, a student who does not have lawful immigration status must submit an affidavit stating that the student has applied for lawful presence or will apply as soon as he or she is able to do so. These students shall not be counted as resident students for any other purpose, but are eligible for the college opportunity fund stipend pursuant to the provisions of that program, and may be eligible for institutional or other financial aid.

The bill creates an exception to the requirement of admission to an institution within 12 months after graduating or completing a GED for certain students who either graduated or completed a GED prior to a certain date and who have been continuously present in Colorado for a specified period of time prior to enrolling in an institution.

The bill exempts persons receiving educational services or benefits from institutions of higher education from providing any required documentation of lawful presence in the U.S. On Jan. 24, the Education Committee approved and the unamended bill to the Appropriations Committee.