June 17, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Trial Court Must Determine Whether Retrospective Competency Evaluation Feasible

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Lindsey on Thursday, July 12, 2018.

Competency—Jury Instructions—Unanimity Instruction.

Lindsey persuaded six individuals to invest $3 million in new technology that would allegedly use algae-based bioluminescent energy to light signs and panels. Lindsey told his investors that he had contracts to sell his new technology. Neither the technology nor the contracts ever existed, and Lindsey allegedly spent the money on repaying other investors and on personal expenses. A jury convicted Lindsey of eight counts of securities fraud and four counts of theft.

On appeal, Lindsey contended that the trial court erred in refusing to order a competency evaluation where the issue was raised by his counsel’s motion before trial. Here, the trial court failed to comply with the statutory procedure. The motion was facially valid, and the trial court abused its discretion in concluding that a facially valid motion on competency did not fall under the competency statute.

Lindsey next argued that the trial court erred by (1) instructing the jury that “any note” constitutes a security, and (2) giving an improper unanimity instruction. As to the first argument, Lindsey’s trial was conducted before People v. Mendenhall, 2015 COA 107M. In the event of retrial, the trial court and parties should apply Mendenhall’s four-factor test in crafting new jury instructions. As to the second contention, regarding Count 6, which included three separate transactions, the unanimity instruction should be modified to specify that the jury must agree unanimously that defendant committed the same act or that defendant committed all of the acts included within the period charged.

The judgment was vacated and the case was remanded with directions.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.